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Maine Bicentennial

American Revolution

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Falmouth Neck As It Was When Destroyed By Mowett, Oct. 18, 1775, William Willis Dec 1830

Falmouth Neck As It Was When Destroyed By Mowett, Oct. 18, 1775, William Willis

Maine Bicentennial

Black and white by William Willis in 1831, depicting Falmouth Neck (present day Portland) as it appeared prior to the October 18, 1775 bombardment by the British Navy under the command of Captain Henry Mowat (1734-1798). Willis includes the caption: "All the buildings within the Dotted line were destroyed except a few within the perfect line." British ships depicted in the etching include the 16-gun HMS Canceau[sic], the 20-gun Cat, the bomb sloop HMS Spitfire, and the HMS Symmetry labeled "store vessel." The unlabeled ship may be the 12-gun schooner HMS Halifax. Mowat was under orders from Vice-Admiral Samuel ...


Oration Delivered At Wiscasset, July Fourth, 1823, Moses Emery Dec 1822

Oration Delivered At Wiscasset, July Fourth, 1823, Moses Emery

Maine Bicentennial

Forty years following the close of the American Revolution, this speech by Moses Emery demonstrates the evolution of patriotic rhetoric used to romanticize the War of Independence.


Map Of The Country Which Was The Scene Of Operations Of The Northern Army ; Including The Wilderness Through Which General Arnold Marched To Attack, Francis Shallus Jan 1807

Map Of The Country Which Was The Scene Of Operations Of The Northern Army ; Including The Wilderness Through Which General Arnold Marched To Attack, Francis Shallus

Maine Bicentennial

Black and white map of the country which was the scene of operations of the Northern Army; including the wilderness through which General Arnold marched to attack Quebec. Engraved for the Life of Washington. Plate VI from: Atlas to accompany John Marshall's The life of George Washington. Philadelphia, 1804-07. Though this map depicts the route of the Kennebec River and landscape through which Benedict Arnold lead a force of the Continental Army, it does not mark the 350 mile trail to Quebec. The 1,100 man force was reduced to 600 sick and starving men by the time Arnold ...