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Maine Bicentennial

Slavery

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Speech Of Hon. I Washburn, Jr. Of Maine, On The Bill To Organize Territorial Governments In Nebraska And Kansas, And Against The Abrogation Of The Missouri Compromise, Israel Washburn Jr. Jan 1854

Speech Of Hon. I Washburn, Jr. Of Maine, On The Bill To Organize Territorial Governments In Nebraska And Kansas, And Against The Abrogation Of The Missouri Compromise, Israel Washburn Jr.

Maine Bicentennial

In the last half of the nineteenth century we find a proposition in the Congress of the Republic to extend the area of slavery. This is the object and purpose of certain provisions in the bill for the organization of the Territories of Nebraska and Kansas. These provisions remove the restrictions impored by the Missouri compromise. The Badger amendment, and the opinions which it has elicited, I pass by as of no practical importance or interest. It is enough to secure any opposition that the bill, with or without that amendment, exposes all our unorganized territory to the occupation of ...


Speech Of Mr. Severance, Of Maine, On The Right Of Petition, Luther Severeance Jan 1844

Speech Of Mr. Severance, Of Maine, On The Right Of Petition, Luther Severeance

Maine Bicentennial

Luther Severance (1797-1855) was a printer, politician, and diplomat. He established the Kennebec Journal in Augusta, Maine in 1825 and served in both the Maine House of Representatives and State Senate. A prominent member of the Whig party, he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives serving during the 28th and 29th sessions of Congress (March 4, 1843–March 3, 1847).

Rep. Luther Severance response to efforts Rep. Edward Black of Georgia and Rep. George C. Dromgoole of Virginia to amend the rules of the U.S. House of Representatives to prohibit discussion on the floor of any ...


The Missouri Compromise: Or, The Extension Of The Slave Power, James Appleton Dec 1842

The Missouri Compromise: Or, The Extension Of The Slave Power, James Appleton

Maine Bicentennial

Slavery exerted no slight influence over the public mind at the period when the Federal Constitution was framed; but it has continually increased in power, and become more and more malignant, from that time until the present. In proof of this, I might advert to many of the leading measures of the National Government, and to much of the history of our country, since the adoption of the Constitution; but I choose to illustrate this position, by referring to the prevailing opinion of those who framed the Constitution, and to a single subsequent act of the Government, viz., “The Missouri ...