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Articles 1 - 13 of 13

Full-Text Articles in History

Turning Seventy, Rowan Cahill Nov 2015

Turning Seventy, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

The author's ruminations on the occasion of him reaching the age of 70 years old.


Denis Kevans: Poet, Rowan Cahill Aug 2015

Denis Kevans: Poet, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

A brief account of the poetry of Australian social movement poet Denis Kevans (1939-2005).


Radical Ruminations, Rowan Cahill, Terry Irving Mar 2015

Radical Ruminations, Rowan Cahill, Terry Irving

Rowan Cahill

Beginning in 2010, historians Rowan Cahill and Terry Irving made wide ranging and reflective diary style contributions to their blog 'Radical Sydney/Radical History' about the nature of 'radical history', the process of being 'radical historians', politics, and political activism. This is that body of work.


Mullen's Choices, Rowan Cahill Dec 2014

Mullen's Choices, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Obituary/biographical note concerning Geoff Mullen (1947-2014), and his anti-conscription activities (1967-1972) in Australia during the Vietnam War.


Maritime Internationalism, Rowan Cahill May 1999

Maritime Internationalism, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

An account of the long records of internationalism of the Seamen's Union of Australia (SUA) and the Waterside Workers' Federation (WWF), and the way these records contributed to vital international support for the Maritime Union of Australia (MUA) during the bitter Australian 'War on the Waterfront' (1998). The MUA was formed in 1993 following the amalgamation of the SUA and the WWF.


Vietnam Reading, Rowan Cahill Jan 1998

Vietnam Reading, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

During Australia's involvement in the Vietnam War, the author was prominent in the anti-war movement, and a conscientious objector to the system of compulsory military service in place at the time. In this article he accounts for the intellectual development which shaped his politics. The focus of the article is the reading he did during the 1960s.


75th Anniversary Of The Foundation Of The Communist Party Of Australia, 1995, Rowan Cahill May 1996

75th Anniversary Of The Foundation Of The Communist Party Of Australia, 1995, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

The 75th Anniversay of the foundation of the Communist Party of Australia (CPA) was commemorated in Sydney in 1995. Although the Party voluntarily wound up in 1991, its impact and legacy on the nation was, and is, an ongoing subject of scholarly interest and debate. This article is Cahill's report of the commemoration event, and his ruminations on the significance of the Party on Australia's history and culture.


The Cold War And Beyond, Rowan Cahill Jul 1985

The Cold War And Beyond, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Review article centred on Ann Curthoys and John Merritt, editors, 'Australia's First Cold War, 1945-1953, Volume 1: Society, Communism and Culture' (Allen and Unwin, 1984) in which Cahill discusses Australian Cold War historiography, and reflects autobiographically about growing up as a 'Cold War' youth.


The Decline Of History, Rowan Cahill Jan 1977

The Decline Of History, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Written at a time when the teaching of 'History' was declining in Australian secondary schools (1970s), this is a view from the classroom by a classroom teacher. The author trenchantly defends the place of 'History' as a subject in Secondary schools, and opposes its teaching by non-history trained teachers, as well as the introduction of 'thematic' approaches. Instead he defends a broad 'History' curriculum, the exploration of cause and effect, and for Senior students, their introduction to the notion of 'historiography'.


The New Left In Australia, Rowan Cahill Aug 1969

The New Left In Australia, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Paper presented as part of the Eleventh Annual Conference of the Australasian Political Studies Association (APSA), 28th-30th August, 1969, University of Sydney. It is of historical interest, being an early exploration and evaluation of the Australian New Left by activist/participant/analyst Rowan Cahill (b. 1945- ). It predates more widely cited sources and authorities, and has been a difficult source to locate due to the limited nature of its original distribution.


Notes On The New Left In Australia, Rowan Cahill Apr 1969

Notes On The New Left In Australia, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

This is a fifty-page monograph sympathetically discussing the Australian New Left as it was developing at the time of publication in 1969. Published by the Australian Marxist Research Foundation, Sydney, it includes a lengthy bibliography. This publication is the only contemporary public document providing a comprehensive overview of the developing Australian New Left, and its diversity of contributing streams and formations. This file is a copy of the gestetnered original, complete with imperfections.


Student Power, Rowan Cahill Aug 1968

Student Power, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Contemporary account by a participant-observer of the upsurge in 1968 of student activism on Australian university campuses, with particular emphasis on the concepts of 'student power' and 'democratisation'. The article is both a background piece, and a critique of the Australian university system and its operation at the time.


The Lost Ideal, Rowan Cahill, R Connell, B Freeman, T Irving, B Scribner Oct 1967

The Lost Ideal, Rowan Cahill, R Connell, B Freeman, T Irving, B Scribner

Rowan Cahill

Authored alphabetically by R. Cahill, R. Connell, B. Freeman, T. Irving, and B. Scribner, “The Lost Ideal” was published in the Sydney University student newspaper 'honi soit' on Tuesday, 3 October 1967. It was the foundation manifesto of what was to become known as the Free U, initially operating out of rented premises in Redfern (Sydney) before moving to premises in nearby suburbs. The first Free U courses commenced in December 1967, and early in the new year involved 150 people. At its peak, during the summer of 1968-1969, over 300 people were involved in courses. The Sydney experiment, which ...