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Selected Works

Australia

Terence H Irving, Dr (Terry)

Sociology

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in History

Youth In Australia - Policy, Administration And Politics, Terry Irving, David Maunders, Geoff Sherington Jan 2014

Youth In Australia - Policy, Administration And Politics, Terry Irving, David Maunders, Geoff Sherington

Terence H Irving, Dr (Terry)

This book describes and analyses the development of youth policy in Australia since the end of World War II. Three eras are distinguished in terms of how society constructed youth as a problem: as juvenile delinquency (to 1960); as a generation gap (to the mid-1970s); and most recently as a wasted resource (1975-1990). In each period chapters cover: the social and demographic context and images of young people; policy development; bureaucratic structures; and the politics of youth and youth policy.


Class Structure In Australian History - Poverty And Progress, Terry Irving, Raewyn Connell Jan 2014

Class Structure In Australian History - Poverty And Progress, Terry Irving, Raewyn Connell

Terence H Irving, Dr (Terry)

First published in 1980, this book is an updated and reorganized account of the history of the class structure in Australia. A new chapter discusses the period 1975-1991, and there is a new theoretical chapter introducing the reader to modern debates about class. Separate sections for documents and photographs support the narrative. Extensive notes provide a guide to research literature.


The Southern Tree Of Liberty - The Democratic Movement In New South Wales Before 1856, Terry Irving Jan 2014

The Southern Tree Of Liberty - The Democratic Movement In New South Wales Before 1856, Terry Irving

Terence H Irving, Dr (Terry)

Responsible government began in New South Wales after two decades of radical democratic agitation. Radical intellectuals from England, Ireland, Scotland and Europe mobilized the working men and women of the colony to resist the aristocratic form of government proposed by pastoralists and city capitalists. There was violence on the streets and goldfields, and some notable electoral victories. As 'a great fear' gripped the local elites the British government forced them to accept a more liberal form of representative government in the belief that this would placate the democrats and keep the colony safe for British imperial needs.