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Selected Works

2013

Islamic History

Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in History

Al-MaʾMūn, John Turner Jul 2013

Al-MaʾMūn, John Turner

John P. Turner

No abstract provided.


Ibn Ḥanbal, Aḥmad, John Turner Jul 2013

Ibn Ḥanbal, Aḥmad, John Turner

John P. Turner

No abstract provided.


Inquisition In Early Islam: The Competition For Political And Religious Authority In The Abbasid Empire, John Turner Apr 2013

Inquisition In Early Islam: The Competition For Political And Religious Authority In The Abbasid Empire, John Turner

John P. Turner

In 833 CE, the Abbasid Caliph al-Ma'mun began a period of inquisition (mihna), one which continued until his successor al-Mutawakkil decreed its end, fifteen years later. During this period, the Caliphs in power strove to promote 'correct belief' in the 'createdness' of the Qur'an, thus ordering the interrogation of religious scholars, and disqualifying, punishing or even executing those who answered incorrectly. Here, John P. Turner examines this major episode, viewing it as a pivotal point in the struggle between the temporal authorities and religious law in the Middle East. By examining the definition of 'heresy', Turner presents a ...


The End Of The Miḥna, John Turner Apr 2013

The End Of The Miḥna, John Turner

John P. Turner

Why did al-Mutawakkil end the Miḥna? The usual answer to this question assumes that he was acknowledging the inevitable victory of the ulamā. He is seen to be `cutting his losses' by restoring and enforcing orthodoxy as the traditionalist ulamā saw it. In this article I offer a different answer. Al-Mutawakkil ended the Miḥna as one part of his broader effort to establish his position as sovereign and independent of the individuals and structures that had carried over from al-Wāthiq's reign. Eliminating the Miḥna was one strategy deployed in undermining and eliminating the “kingmakers” who had placed him on ...


The Death Of Al-ʿAbbās B. Al-MaʾMūn And A “Thwarted” Coup D’État, John P. Turner Apr 2013

The Death Of Al-ʿAbbās B. Al-MaʾMūn And A “Thwarted” Coup D’État, John P. Turner

John P. Turner

This article focuses on the point at which the slave soldiers of al-Muʿtaṣim (r. a.h. 218–227/833–842 c.e.) rose to the political forefront and came to dominate the holder of the Caliphal seat. It is a study of the mechanisms by which the center of the state, and more specifically the Caliph, came to be their captives.


The Abnā' Al-Dawla: The Definition And Legitimation Of Identity In Response To The Fourth Fitna, John Turner Apr 2013

The Abnā' Al-Dawla: The Definition And Legitimation Of Identity In Response To The Fourth Fitna, John Turner

John P. Turner

This article will reopen the question about the identity and provenance of the abnā' al-dawla. Who were they? When did they form as a collective and why? The standard view is that the abnā' al-dawla were the backbone of the Abbasid dynasty, coming into existence with that regime after the revolution circa 132/750 and consisting of the original fighters from Khurasan and their descendants, who formed an elite social and political structure of supporters. This privileged status accorded them the moniker abnā' al-dawla (sons/supporters of the dynasty).


The QurʾĀn, John Turner Mar 2013

The QurʾĀn, John Turner

John P. Turner

No abstract provided.