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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in History

An Early Angling History Of The Maine's West Grand Lake Region, William Krohn Aug 2013

An Early Angling History Of The Maine's West Grand Lake Region, William Krohn

William B. Krohn

Attached is a partial bibliography documenting the early anglers who fished, and wrote about, Grand Lake Stream, Maine. This document includes a 1901 photograph of a few local inhabitants with the village in the background.


Capt. Charles A. J. Farrar: Wilderness Writer And Adventure Provider, William B. Krohn Aug 2013

Capt. Charles A. J. Farrar: Wilderness Writer And Adventure Provider, William B. Krohn

William B. Krohn

This article focuses on the life of Capt. Charles A. J. Farrar, emphasizing Farrar’s contributions to the birth and growth of tourism in western Maine. The article is based on a lecture that Dr. Krohn presented for the annual Hall Memorial Lecture at the Bethel Historical Society on October 13, 2012.


Henry O. Stanley And His Fishing Tackle Business, William Krohn Aug 2013

Henry O. Stanley And His Fishing Tackle Business, William Krohn

William B. Krohn

This article provides a detailed discussion of the fishing tackle business of Henry O. Stanley as a part of Maine's nineteenth century outdoor heritage. Stanley's most famous lure was known as the Rangeley Spinner, and the author traces the history of this and other lures developed by Stanley. Several images are included in the article, including one of Dixfield Village on the banks of the Androscoggin River showing the location of Stanley's tackle shop on Weld Street.


Henry O. Stanley And His Fishing Tackle Business, William Krohn Dec 2012

Henry O. Stanley And His Fishing Tackle Business, William Krohn

William B. Krohn

This is an expanded version, with color illustrations, of Krohn’s Stanley article published by the Dixfield Historical Society in 2012. This updated article is followed by an article by L. Hirsch that documents the discovery of Henry O. Stanley’s personal fishing tackle. Stanley’s tackle, more than 100 years after his death, was still relatively intact. Originals of Krohn’s expanded article, along with Hirsch’s article, are on file in Special Collections, Raymond H. Fogler Library, University of Maine.