Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Selected Works

2013

None

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Constitutional History

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in History

How Many Unique Words Did It Take To Write Our First Constitution?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Apr 2013

How Many Unique Words Did It Take To Write Our First Constitution?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

In 3,466 words – crafted between July, 1776 and November, 1777 – the Continental Congress created Constitution I, universally known as the Articles of Confederation. How many of these words are unique? And how many of these 3,466 words did the Philadelphia convention use in crafting the 4,321 words of Constitution II?


How Many Unique Words Did It Take To Write Our First Constitution?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2013

How Many Unique Words Did It Take To Write Our First Constitution?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

In 3,466 words – crafted between July, 1776 and November, 1777 – the Continental Congress created Constitution I, universally known as the Articles of Confederation. How many of these words are unique? And how many of these 3,466 words did the Philadelphia convention use in crafting the 4,321 words of Constitution II?


Table Annexed To Article: Our Constitutional Kinesis: Words That Can Go Like A Machine, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2013

Table Annexed To Article: Our Constitutional Kinesis: Words That Can Go Like A Machine, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Americans have long been known for their appreciation of the kinetic effort involved in writing constitutional text, as long as the work begun at York, Pa (October, 1777) is subordinated to that commenced at Philadelphia (May, 1787). Gathered in one place are selected ‘machine’ quotes by which text itself is ennobled as automaton. OCL lists and reports for further investigation into this phenomenon.


National Legislators Appraise Their World: A Comparison Of Us And Uk Text Writers (1801/1802), Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jan 2013

National Legislators Appraise Their World: A Comparison Of Us And Uk Text Writers (1801/1802), Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Parliament (primary text writer, the House of Commons) produced 26,647 words beginning in 1801; in in a comparable interval, Congress produced 27,123 words. By happy coincidence, this was the first year that Parliament served as the text-writer for the newly-minted United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. Appraisives in the English language, numbering 3,687 have been tested against the Early Constitution. Appraisives in the Early Constitution, 2 OCL 193. This investigation tests the known class of appraisives in these target vocabularies employed by Congress and Parliament. Mean words between ‘hits’ are returned.


Table Annexed To Article: James Madison’S ‘Imperfections Of Language’, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Dec 2012

Table Annexed To Article: James Madison’S ‘Imperfections Of Language’, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

No abstract provided.