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Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in History

The Lost Ideal, Rowan Cahill, R Connell, Brian Freeman, Terry Irving, Bob Scribner Jan 2014

The Lost Ideal, Rowan Cahill, R Connell, Brian Freeman, Terry Irving, Bob Scribner

Terence H Irving, Dr (Terry)

Now a document of historical interest and significance, this is the foundation manifesto of the Free University, Sydney. Conducted in rented premises in Redfern and nearby inner-Sydney suburbs, this utopian education experiment ran from December 1967 until it closed in 1972. At its height, during the Summer of 1968-1969, some 300 people were involved.


"Labour History And Its Political Role - A New Landscape, Terry Irving Jan 2014

"Labour History And Its Political Role - A New Landscape, Terry Irving

Terence H Irving, Dr (Terry)

This address to a centenary issue forum for the Australian journal, "Labour History", focused on the political role of the journal in academic circles. It discussed the politics involved in the journal's foundation and the political implications of the redefinition of its field by Van der Linden, especially his use of the distinction between labour as toil and creative work. It is also a distinction made by recent 'autonomist' theorists. The article concludes by recommending that the journal should drop its present subtitle; that labour historians should pay more attention to the theoretical discussions of (working) class, multitude and ...


Rediscovering Radical History, Terry Irving Jan 2014

Rediscovering Radical History, Terry Irving

Terence H Irving, Dr (Terry)

This article examines aspects of the connection between radical history and labour history in Australia. It begins by resurrecting the forgotten history work by intellectuals in the labour movement from the 1880s to the 1950s, and the conservative attacks on radical history in the 50s and 60s. It continues by highlighting the early attempts to keep this radical tradition alive among labour historians, and concludes by criticising Robin Gollan's failure to distinguish popular democracy from the democratic possibilities of representative government.