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Medieval Studies

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Full-Text Articles in History

Rotuli Parisienses: Supplications To The Pope From The University Of Paris, Volume 3: 1387-1394, 2 Vols. Edited By William J. Courtenay And Eric D. Goddard, Alex J. Novikoff Sep 2019

Rotuli Parisienses: Supplications To The Pope From The University Of Paris, Volume 3: 1387-1394, 2 Vols. Edited By William J. Courtenay And Eric D. Goddard, Alex J. Novikoff

Alex Novikoff

No abstract provided.


Bartered Bodies: Medieval Pilgrims And The Tissue Of Faith, George D. Greenia Mar 2019

Bartered Bodies: Medieval Pilgrims And The Tissue Of Faith, George D. Greenia

George Greenia

In ‘The Bartered Body,’ George Greenia disentangles the complex desires and experiences of religious travellers of the High Middle Ages who knew the spiritual usefulness of their vulnerable flesh. The bodily remains of the saints housed in pilgrim shrines were not just remnants of a redeemed past, but open portals for spiritual exchange with the living body of the visiting pilgrim.


Santiago De Compostela, George Greenia Mar 2019

Santiago De Compostela, George Greenia

George Greenia

This collaborative literary history of Europe, the first yet attempted, unfolds through ten sequences of places linked by trade, travel, topography, language, pilgrimage, alliance, disease, and artistic exchange. The period covered, 1348-1418, provides deep context for understanding current developments in Europe, particularly as initiated by the destruction and disasters of World War II. We begin with the greatest of all European catastrophes: the 1348 bubonic plague, which killed one person in three. Literary cultures helped speed recovery from this unprecedented "ground zero" experience, providing solace, distraction, and new ideals to live by. Questions of where Europe begins and ends, then ...


Incremental Urbanism In Medieval Italy: The Example Of Todi, Samuel D. Gruber Dr. Dec 2016

Incremental Urbanism In Medieval Italy: The Example Of Todi, Samuel D. Gruber Dr.

Samuel D. Gruber, Ph.D.

The shape and texture of the medieval Italian city is examined in this study of the small decisions made to create the urban form of the medieval Umbrian town of Todi.


Battifoglio Network, Tunis 1288-9, Jeff Miner Aug 2016

Battifoglio Network, Tunis 1288-9, Jeff Miner

Jeff Miner

No abstract provided.


Review Article: Could Isidore’S Chronicle Have Delighted Cicero? Using The Concept Of Genre To Compare Ancient And Medieval Chronicles, Jesse W. Torgerson Dec 2015

Review Article: Could Isidore’S Chronicle Have Delighted Cicero? Using The Concept Of Genre To Compare Ancient And Medieval Chronicles, Jesse W. Torgerson

Jesse W Torgerson

Richard W. Burgess and Michael Kulikowski’s A Historical Introduction to the Chronicle Genre
from its Origins to the High Middle Ages (Volume I in the authors’ planned series Mosaics of
Time: The Latin Chronicle Traditions from the First Century BC to the Sixth Century AD) posits
that medieval studies has neglected to engage in a systematic, historically-informed reflection
on the genre of chronicles. The present article asserts that this challenge to the field presents
a unique opportunity for an interdisciplinary discussion of wide scope and lasting duration. I
thus argue that Burgess and Kulikowski’s larger points may be ...


The Dramatic Tradition Of The Middle Ages, Clifford Davidson Dec 2015

The Dramatic Tradition Of The Middle Ages, Clifford Davidson

Clifford Davidson

The twenty-five essays in this collection provide unusual insights into early European drama. Written by American, European, and Japanese scholars, the contributions focus on such subjects as recent discoveries of medieval music-dramas and the conditions of their composition and performance pictorial elements in English and Continental vemacular drama, the later history of medieval drama, and secular plays and playing. The articles first appeared in The Early Drama, Art, and Music Review, which was the official journal of the EDAM project at the Medieval institute Western Michigan University and are included here for their unique contribution to drama studies. Altogether, the ...


Lions In The Desert: The Significance And Symbolism Of Lions In Early Egyptian Monastic Literature, Kyler Williamsen May 2015

Lions In The Desert: The Significance And Symbolism Of Lions In Early Egyptian Monastic Literature, Kyler Williamsen

Kyler Williamsen

Early monastic literature is filled with symbolism and employs allegory to instruct future generations of faithful ascetics. Animals are regularly used in these writings to demonstrate the spiritual power and prowess of the monk. While works such as Waddell’s Beasts and Saints or O’Malley’s The Animals of St. Gregory present a wonderful summary of animals in monastic literature, an analysis of the possible symbolic nature of these animals’ behavior in monastic literature is sorely lacking. My paper, entitled Lions in the Desert, explores the symbolic roles which played charting a monk’s progress in the ascetic life ...


Zoomorphic Penannular Brooches In 6th And 7th Century Ireland, Esther G. Ward May 2015

Zoomorphic Penannular Brooches In 6th And 7th Century Ireland, Esther G. Ward

Esther G. Ward

In this thesis the author examines the evolution, manufacture, and societal significance of zoomorphic penannular brooches, a type of metal dress fastener used in early medieval Ireland that is often decorated. The brooches examined are dated to the 6th and 7th centuries, during which the Irish underwent a process of religious conversion from Celtic paganism to Christianity, and social rank was paramount. It is in this social context that the brooches are examined. Despite the significance of this time of social change, brooches from this period tend to be overlooked by scholarship in favor of the more ornate metalwork of ...


Lecture — Judaism, Christianity And Medieval Books, Miriamne Krummel, Bobbi Sutherland Apr 2015

Lecture — Judaism, Christianity And Medieval Books, Miriamne Krummel, Bobbi Sutherland

Bobbi Sutherland

Part of the College of Arts and Sciences' Rites. Rights. Writes. series and the Imprints and Impressions events, this lecture discusses the texts of Thomas Aquinas, Geoffrey Chaucer, William Shakespeare, Anne Frank and others. Presenters are Miriamne Ara Krummel, Associate Professor of English, and Bobbi Sutherland, Assistant Professor of History. (Event was held Nov. 4, 2014, in the Kennedy Union Torch Lounge.)


Lecture — Judaism, Christianity And Medieval Books, Miriamne Krummel, Bobbi Sutherland Apr 2015

Lecture — Judaism, Christianity And Medieval Books, Miriamne Krummel, Bobbi Sutherland

Miriamne Ara Krummel

Part of the College of Arts and Sciences' Rites. Rights. Writes. series and the Imprints and Impressions events, this lecture discusses the texts of Thomas Aquinas, Geoffrey Chaucer, William Shakespeare, Anne Frank and others. Presenters are Miriamne Ara Krummel, Associate Professor of English, and Bobbi Sutherland, Assistant Professor of History. (Event was held Nov. 4, 2014, in the Kennedy Union Torch Lounge.)


Monastic Prisons And Torture Chambers: Crime And Punishment In Central European Monasteries, 1600-1800, Ulrich Lehner Mar 2015

Monastic Prisons And Torture Chambers: Crime And Punishment In Central European Monasteries, 1600-1800, Ulrich Lehner

Ulrich L. Lehner

Following the Council of Trent (1545-1563), Catholic religious orders underwent substantial reform. Nevertheless, on occasion monks and nuns had to be disciplined and—if they had committed a crime—punished. Consequently, many religious orders relied on sophisticated criminal law traditions that included torture, physical punishment, and prison sentences. Ulrich L. Lehner provides for the first time an overview of how monasteries in central Europe prosecuted crime and punished their members, and thus introduces a host of new questions for anyone interested in state-church relations, gender questions, the history of violence, or the development of modern monasticism.


The Evolution And Antithesis Of Western Music, Dan Rager Dec 2014

The Evolution And Antithesis Of Western Music, Dan Rager

Dan Rager

This article examines the Evolution and Antithesis of Western Music from early Biblical Times (3500 B.C.) through the Baroque Period (1600-1750 A. D.). The material presented encompasses many different cultures from around the world. Herein, the Sumerians, Babylonians, Greeks, Jews, Romans, and other cultures are examined. Religious and cultural ideologies clash while similarities parallel these mediums exposing juxtapositions that transcend throughout the ages.
The article discusses early musical systems, periodical musical practices, musical elements (voices vs. instruments) permitted and forbidden by the church, the use of sacred and secular music and the development of these “musical forms” which include ...


Frederick Ii: Holy Roman Emperor Extraordinaire, Prose/Poem 7/23/2014, Charles Kay Smith Jul 2014

Frederick Ii: Holy Roman Emperor Extraordinaire, Prose/Poem 7/23/2014, Charles Kay Smith

Charles Kay Smith

Frederick avoided fighting the 6th Crusade by negotiating a peaceful sharing of Jerusalem by people of all faiths. No doubt it helped that he spoke Arabic and personally engaged in five months of negotiations rather than combat.


Between Lipany And White Mountain: Essays In Late Medieval And Early Modern Bohemian History In Modern Czech Scholarship (Studies In Central European Histories), James Palmitessa Jun 2014

Between Lipany And White Mountain: Essays In Late Medieval And Early Modern Bohemian History In Modern Czech Scholarship (Studies In Central European Histories), James Palmitessa

Dorilee Schieble

This book presents twelve essays by Czech historians on the history of the Czech lands from the middle of the fifteenth to the middle of the seventeenth century, previously published in Czech, which appear here for the first time in English.


Richard Newhauser (Ed.), The Seven Deadly Sins: From Communities To Individuals (Book Review), Denise A. Kaiser Mar 2014

Richard Newhauser (Ed.), The Seven Deadly Sins: From Communities To Individuals (Book Review), Denise A. Kaiser

Denise A. Kaiser

Book review by Denise Kaiser: ISBN 9789004157859


The Remarkable Life And Career Of The Breton Ansger, Monk And Poet On The Loire Valley Who Became Bishop Of Catania In Sicily 1091-1124, George Beech Dec 2013

The Remarkable Life And Career Of The Breton Ansger, Monk And Poet On The Loire Valley Who Became Bishop Of Catania In Sicily 1091-1124, George Beech

George T. Beech

A key figure in the establishment of the Latin church in Arabic Sicily after the Norman conquest was Bishop Ansger of Catania 1091-1124. Newly found information shows that, by origin a Breton, he first became a monk at St. Florent of Saumur in the Loire valley, then made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem. After his return he entered the monastery of St. Eufemia in Calabria where his rise to the office of prior led Count Roger of Sicily to choose him, with the approval of Pope Urban II, as the first bishop of Catania and abbot of St. Agatha. In a ...


Egbert’S England, George Beech Jan 2013

Egbert’S England, George Beech

George T. Beech

No abstract provided.


Obscurity In Medieval Texts, Lucie Doležalová, Jeff Rider, Alessandro Zironi Dec 2012

Obscurity In Medieval Texts, Lucie Doležalová, Jeff Rider, Alessandro Zironi

Jeff Rider

Modern readers of medieval texts often find them obscure. Some of this obscurity is accidental and inevitable due to the historical and cultural distance that separates modern readers from medieval authors, but medieval readers and authors also appear to have simply had a higher tolerance for textual obscurity than we do and even to have viewed obscurity as desirable and a virtue. They did not believe that obscurity could ever be eradicated and were not scared of the indescribable, indivisible, and ungraspable; they accepted reality as complex and ultimately unintelligible. Obscurity was not simply a riddle to be solved. It ...


Vice, Tyranny, Violence, And The Usurpation Of Flanders (1071) In Flemish Historiography From 1093 To 1294, Jeff Rider Dec 2012

Vice, Tyranny, Violence, And The Usurpation Of Flanders (1071) In Flemish Historiography From 1093 To 1294, Jeff Rider

Jeff Rider

No abstract provided.


Corpus Christi Plays At York: A Context For Religious Drama, Clifford Davidson Dec 2012

Corpus Christi Plays At York: A Context For Religious Drama, Clifford Davidson

Clifford Davidson

For roughly two centuries, the streets of the city of York were home to the annual performance of a cycle of mystery plays held in conjunction with the festival of Corpus Christi. Remarkable as the resilience of such an event is, no scholar has yet to survey fully the plays' urban setting, especially with a view to understanding how and why they might have continued to appeal to citizens and spectators. One theory has been that the City of York made the guilds perform the plays. Yet, as Davidson argues, this is not a satisfactory solution, despite the admittedly coercive ...


Melusine; Or The Noble History Of Lusignan, Donald Maddox, Sara Sturm-Maddox Dec 2011

Melusine; Or The Noble History Of Lusignan, Donald Maddox, Sara Sturm-Maddox

Donald Maddox

Jean d’Arras’s splendid late fourteenth-century prose romance Melusine – written for Jean de Berry, the brother of King Charles V of France – is one of the most significant and complex literary works of the later Middle Ages. The author, promising to tell us “how the noble and powerful fortress of Lusignan in Poitou was founded by a fairy,” writes a ceaselessly astonishing account of the origins of the powerful feudal dynasty of the Lusignans in southwestern France, which flourished in western Europe and the Near East during the age of the Crusades. The spellbinding story of the destinies of ...


Henry, Archdeacon Of Huntingdon. Anglicanus Ortus: A Verse Herbal Of The Twelfth Century, Winston Black Dec 2011

Henry, Archdeacon Of Huntingdon. Anglicanus Ortus: A Verse Herbal Of The Twelfth Century, Winston Black

Winston Edward Black II

Henry, archdeacon of Huntingdon, England (ca 1088-ca 1154) has been admired for centuries as the author of the monumental . The recent discovery of the Anglicanus ortus opens a new window onto this important English author as well as onto the uses of poetry and the knowledge of medicine in medieval England. Written entirely in Latin verse, the Anglicanus ortus describes the medicinal uses of 160 different herbs, spices, and vegetables. Henry drew on centuries of learned medicine to compose this work, employing the medical knowledge of ancient authors like Pliny the Elder and Dioscorides and of medieval scholars like Walahfrid ...


World Literature As A Communal Apartment: Semyon Lipkin’S Ethics Of Translational Difference, Rebecca Gould Dec 2011

World Literature As A Communal Apartment: Semyon Lipkin’S Ethics Of Translational Difference, Rebecca Gould

Rebecca Gould

No abstract provided.


Did William Ix (The Troubadour) Know Virgil?, George Beech Dec 2010

Did William Ix (The Troubadour) Know Virgil?, George Beech

George T. Beech

No abstract provided.


The Spoils Of War, Rebecca Gould Dec 2010

The Spoils Of War, Rebecca Gould

Rebecca Gould

“The Spoils of War,” New Writing: The International Journal for the Practice and Theory of Creative Writing (story about war and corruption in the North Caucasus, with critical introduction comparing the Chechen war to the Palestinian conflict) 82 (2011): 35-42.


Artículo Político Campaña Electoral 2011, Pablo Rosser Dec 2010

Artículo Político Campaña Electoral 2011, Pablo Rosser

pablo rosser

Artículo de opinión del autor, como miembro del PSOE en Alicante.


Review Of The Calligrapher’S Secret By Rafik Schami, Rebecca Gould Dec 2010

Review Of The Calligrapher’S Secret By Rafik Schami, Rebecca Gould

Rebecca Gould

The Calligrapher’s Secret by Rafik Schami, Wasafiri: The Magazine of International Contemporary Writing 27 (3): 94-96.


The Archaeology Of Judaism, Samuel D. Gruber Dr. Dec 2010

The Archaeology Of Judaism, Samuel D. Gruber Dr.

Samuel D. Gruber, Ph.D.

An introduction to the archaeology of Jewish historic sites in Europe, especially from the Middle Ages. The essay discusses the origin of the field of study and some of the pertinent historical, archaeological, ethical and interpretive developments and issues that have arisen since the 19th century.


Le Diocèse De Thérouanne Au Moyen Age, Jeff Rider, Benoît-Michel Tock Dec 2009

Le Diocèse De Thérouanne Au Moyen Age, Jeff Rider, Benoît-Michel Tock

Jeff Rider

De tous les évêchés du Nord de la France médiévale, celui de Thérouanne est sans doute l’un des moins bien connus. Cette situation s’explique en partie par la perte quasi-complète de ses archives lors de la prise et de la destruction de la ville par Charles Quint en 1553, qui entraînèrent par ailleurs quelques années plus tard le démembrement du diocèse entre ceux de Saint-Omer, Ypres et Boulogne. Aucune étude d’ensemble ne lui avait d’ailleurs été consacrée depuis la thèse de l’historien gantois Hans Van Werveke, »Het bisdom Terwaan van den oorsprong tot het begin ...