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In The Shadow Of The Twentieth: Maine Regiments At Gettysburg, Savannah A. Labbe Nov 2016

In The Shadow Of The Twentieth: Maine Regiments At Gettysburg, Savannah A. Labbe

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

On my first of many tours of the Gettysburg Battlefield,my tour guide was thrilled to learn that my family is from Maine. He made sure to show us the monument to the Twentieth Maine and talk about their valiant stand at Little Round Top. Joshua Chamberlain and his Twentieth Maine regiment have become known as the heroes of Little Round Top and are what most would readily identify when asked about Maine’s role in the Battle of Gettysburg. One might think that Maine’s only contribution to the battle was Chamberlain’s charge. However, Maine units played a ...


Point/Counterpoint: The Gettysburg Battlefield Marathon, Jeffrey L. Lauck, Matthew D. Laroche Nov 2016

Point/Counterpoint: The Gettysburg Battlefield Marathon, Jeffrey L. Lauck, Matthew D. Laroche

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Jeff: On November 6, the small town of Gettysburg will be swarmed by runners during the first ever Gettysburg Battlefield Marathon. The event has provoked heated discussion from many in the Civil War community, bringing up many questions regarding the use of our most hallowed grounds for recreational use. In this post, Matt and I will engage in a back and forth conversation about the concerns and advantages of the race. I’d like to begin by noting that the views that we each express in this piece may not necessarily be our own and that we may merely be ...


The Moment We’Ve All Been Waiting For: Lee’S Gettysburg Headquarters Opens, Savannah Rose Oct 2016

The Moment We’Ve All Been Waiting For: Lee’S Gettysburg Headquarters Opens, Savannah Rose

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

On October 28, 2016, the doors of the Mary Thompson house located on Seminary Ridge in Gettysburg opened before a crowd of over one thousand Civil War Trust members and Civil War enthusiasts. In 2013, the Civil War Trust purchased a portion of land on Seminary Ridge, land covered with a motel, a brewery, a restaurant, and the Mary Thompson house, which some know as the headquarters of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Since purchasing the land the Civil War Trust, in partnership with other organizations, has worked to restore the Thompson property to its 1863 appearance by tearing down ...


Grave’S Anatomy: Abolitionists, Body Snatchers, And The Demise Of Winchester Medical College, Kaylyn L. Sawyer Oct 2016

Grave’S Anatomy: Abolitionists, Body Snatchers, And The Demise Of Winchester Medical College, Kaylyn L. Sawyer

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

A census in 1890 listed Chris Baker’s occupation as “Anatomical Man.” While the title sounds like that one of today’s superheroes, the nineteenth century existence of this vocation kept people from lingering around medical colleges after dark. By day, Chris Baker worked as a janitor for the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond. By night, he had the darker task of obtaining corpses for the school. He was a “resurrectionist,” and he was not alone in his eerie nocturnal task of preying on the powerless and recently interred with a shovel, bag, and cart close at hand. Until ...


The Evolution Of The Military Dog Tag: From The Civil War To Present Day, Savannah A. Labbe Oct 2016

The Evolution Of The Military Dog Tag: From The Civil War To Present Day, Savannah A. Labbe

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

In doing research for my previous post on the U.S. Christian Commission, I came across an intriguing artifact: a Civil War era identification tag, or dog tag. When I picture a military dog tag I see a metal rectangle suspended from a necklace, like those worn by today’s soldiers. One doesn’t usually associate dog tags with the Civil War, which is why I was interested to find one. However, it is not surprising that the basic human fear of dying unknown, of robbing one’s family of closure and certainty, was present during the Civil War just ...


A Tale Of Two Universities: Harvard And Georgetown Accept Their Ties To Slavery, Alexandria J. Andrioli Oct 2016

A Tale Of Two Universities: Harvard And Georgetown Accept Their Ties To Slavery, Alexandria J. Andrioli

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

The Washington Ideas Forum, a Washington D.C. hot-ticket event, reconvened for its eighth year on September 28th and 29th, 2016. Leaders in politics, policy, race and justice, education, science and technology, and even food met to share ideas and have meaningful conversations at the event hosted by The Atlantic and the Aspen Institute. From Speaker of the House Paul Ryan and Secretary of State John Kerry to author Chimamanda Adichie and chef and founder of Momofuku, David Chang, the best and the brightest were all in attendance.

[excerpt]


Remember Harpers Ferry: Masculinity And The 126th New York, Anika N. Jensen Oct 2016

Remember Harpers Ferry: Masculinity And The 126th New York, Anika N. Jensen

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

“The Harpers Ferry Cowards” is not an enviable nickname, but it is the one with which the 126th New York Infantry was stuck after September 15, 1862, the date that saw the largest capture of United States troops until the Battle of Bataan roughly 70 years later. The regiment, which had been active for a mere 21 days, was stationed on Maryland Heights and had been successful in fending off Joseph Kershaw’s brigade on September 12 and 13, but when the 126th observed their colonel, Eliakim Sherrill, being carried from the field after receiving a wound to the face ...


All For Honor: Officer Responses To The Mcconaughy Letters, Olivia J. Ortman Oct 2016

All For Honor: Officer Responses To The Mcconaughy Letters, Olivia J. Ortman

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

In Special Collections here at Gettysburg College is a compilation of letters by Civil War officers responding to an invitation to attend the very first reunion of the Battle of Gettysburg. The reunion was initiated by David McConaughy–a lawyer in Adams County, PA who had organized a group of local men to fight for the Union during the war–and was meant to be a time for the officers who had fought here to come together and walk the battlefield. On this walk, they would point out the locations their troops had occupied during the fight so that McConaughy ...


Images Of Power, Images Of War: Schmucker Art Gallery’S New Exhibit, Laurel J. Wilson Oct 2016

Images Of Power, Images Of War: Schmucker Art Gallery’S New Exhibit, Laurel J. Wilson

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Bodies in Conflict: From Gettysburg to Iraq is a brand new exhibit in Schmucker Art Gallery at Gettysburg College. Curated by Mellon Summer Scholar Laura Bergin ’17, it features eleven depictions of bodies engaged in various conflicts in U.S. history, ranging from the Civil War to the war in Iraq. In addition to curating the physical exhibit found in Schmucker Art Gallery, Bergin also created a virtual version, which can be accessed online through the Schmucker Gallery web page. Of particular interest to those interested in the Civil War are two of the oldest pieces in the collection, a ...


Securing The High Ground: The Civil War Roots Of Aerial Reconnaissance, Kaylyn L. Sawyer May 2016

Securing The High Ground: The Civil War Roots Of Aerial Reconnaissance, Kaylyn L. Sawyer

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

In this era of rapidly advancing technology, debate about aerial surveillance abounds. In March of this year, the Pentagon released its 2015 Inspector General report entitled “Evaluation of DoD’s Use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) for Support to Civil Authorities,” which revealed that the Pentagon had flown spy drones over the U.S. for non-military purposes. Historically, the drone had been used primarily by the military in war zones, but with increased availability and applicability here at home, UAS use has expanded to include public agencies, commercial entities, and private citizens. Surveillance by air, however, is not a new ...


From Post To Park: The Fort Monroe National Monument, Kaylyn L. Sawyer May 2016

From Post To Park: The Fort Monroe National Monument, Kaylyn L. Sawyer

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

The Civil War Institute will be celebrating the National Park Service Centennial this spring with its brand new “Find Your Park Friday” series. Inspired by the NPS #FindYourPark campaign, the series will challenge our fellows to share their experiences exploring America’s national historical, cultural, and natural resources through trips and internships with the NPS. In our sixth post, Kaylyn Sawyer takes a look at the history of her park. [excerpt]


Instruments Of War: A Canadian Musician In A Rhode Island Regiment, Ryan M. Nadeau May 2016

Instruments Of War: A Canadian Musician In A Rhode Island Regiment, Ryan M. Nadeau

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Canada! America’s hat! Our friendly little brother to the north. The home of hockey and Tim Horton’s and your home, too, when that other political party elects their crazy candidate. All jokes aside, the United States has long had a close relationship with our northern neighbor, and the Civil War proved no exception. An estimated 30,000 to 50,000 Canadians fought during the war, typically on the side of the Union due to their geographic proximity and cultural sympathies. Of that number, approximately 5,000 were killed. [excerpt]


“The Union Forever”: Frederick, Maryland In The Elections Of 1860 And 1864, Megan E. Mcnish May 2016

“The Union Forever”: Frederick, Maryland In The Elections Of 1860 And 1864, Megan E. Mcnish

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Frederick, Maryland has been remembered as a bastion of Unionist sentiment during the Civil War. However, in the Election of 1860, on the eve of the nation’s internal conflict, a large portion of the city’s 8,000 residents voted for a secessionist candidate. The Election of 1860 is famous for straying from the typical bi-partisan election; four candidates ran for office and each appealed to different political sentiments. [excerpt]


Harriet Takes The $20: Black Bodies, Historical Precedence, And Political Implications, Megan E. Mcnish Apr 2016

Harriet Takes The $20: Black Bodies, Historical Precedence, And Political Implications, Megan E. Mcnish

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

If you have been watching the news at all lately, you’ve probably seen that Harriet Tubman will be placed on the front of the $20 bill, while former President Andrew Jackson will be moved to the back of the bill. Immediately there emerged an outpouring of support for the proposition. However, in the week that has followed, others have questioned the meaning that will arise out of an African American woman and former slave being placed on American currency. Some have argued that it is not a fitting legacy for a woman who fought against oppression and the system ...


“A Terrible Beauty Is Born”: A Panel On The 1916 Easter Rising, Meg A. Sutter Apr 2016

“A Terrible Beauty Is Born”: A Panel On The 1916 Easter Rising, Meg A. Sutter

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

On Wednesday, April 20, 2016, Gettysburg College students and faculty gathered in Penn Hall Lyceum to acknowledge the centennial of the Easter Rising. On April 24, 1916, the day after Easter Sunday, an armed rebellion led by Irish Republicans seized the General Post Office and other major buildings in the center of Dublin, and declared a “Republic of Ireland.” Approximately 1,600 members of the Irish Volunteers and Irish Citizen Army participated in the six-day rebellion. The Rising was an act to overthrow the British government in Ireland and provoke a full-out revolution. After a week, however, British forces squashed ...


This Month In Civil War History: April 2016, Jeffrey L. Lauck Apr 2016

This Month In Civil War History: April 2016, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Click the play button below in order to listen to “This Month in Civil War History.” You can also scroll down to read through the transcript if you would prefer to read it. This report is also airing on WZBT 91.1 FM throughout this month. Thanks to WZBT for their help in producing this piece. [excerpt]


Find Your Park Friday: For The Love Of Nature, Jeffrey L. Lauck Apr 2016

Find Your Park Friday: For The Love Of Nature, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

The Civil War Institute will be celebrating the National Park Service Centennial this spring with its brand new “Find Your Park Friday” series. Inspired by the NPS #FindYourPark campaign, the series will challenge our fellows to share their experiences exploring America’s national historical, cultural, and natural resources through trips and internships with the NPS. In our second post, Jeff Lauck discusses his passion for photography and the park that started it. [excerpt]


Special Collections Roadshow — Episode Ten: Union Uniform, Meg A. Sutter, Megan E. Mcnish Apr 2016

Special Collections Roadshow — Episode Ten: Union Uniform, Meg A. Sutter, Megan E. Mcnish

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Special Collections Roadshow was created by the Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College in the Spring of 2014. It normally showcases various artifacts from Special Collections at Gettysburg College. For our tenth episode, we went on the road to the Gettysburg National Military Park. Thank you so much to the park staff, specifically Andrew Newman for letting us film an episode on an enlisted man’s uniform in their facility! [excerpt]


Find Your Park Friday: Meg And Megan Take Fredericksburg And Spotsylvania Nmp, Meg A. Sutter, Megan E. Mcnish Apr 2016

Find Your Park Friday: Meg And Megan Take Fredericksburg And Spotsylvania Nmp, Meg A. Sutter, Megan E. Mcnish

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

The Civil War Institute will be celebrating the National Park Service Centennial this spring with its brand new “Find Your Park Friday” series. Inspired by the NPS #FindYourPark campaign, the series will challenge our fellows to share their experiences exploring America’s national historical, cultural, and natural resources through trips and internships with the NPS. In our first post, CWI Social Media Coordinators Meg and Megan discuss their time interning at Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park. [excerpt]


The Forgotten 150th: Why The Civil War Sesquicentennial Is Far From Over, Jeffrey L. Lauck Apr 2016

The Forgotten 150th: Why The Civil War Sesquicentennial Is Far From Over, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Last spring, my friends told me that it was the perfect time to get into Civil War reenacting. “The 150th is over,” they said, “No one is going to care about the Civil War anymore, so everyone will be selling all their stuff.” Somehow, this bit of insider trading information meant more to me than just bargain brogans and frock coats. [excerpt]


“A National Sin”: Samuel Simon Schmucker, Founder Of Gettysburg College, On The Peculiar Institution, Meg A. Sutter Apr 2016

“A National Sin”: Samuel Simon Schmucker, Founder Of Gettysburg College, On The Peculiar Institution, Meg A. Sutter

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Many music and art students at Gettysburg College would recognize the name Schmucker as their building, or affectionately their ‘home,’ on campus. Alumni might even remember Schmucker Hall as their library. However, if asked who founded Gettysburg College, most students and alumni would probably not know his name. Fortunately, our campus is celebrating Founders Day this week to remember those, including our founder Samuel Simon Schmucker, who helped make our college #Gettysburgreat. [excerpt]


A Thaddeus Stevens Musical: A 19th Century Hamilton?, Megan E. Mcnish Apr 2016

A Thaddeus Stevens Musical: A 19th Century Hamilton?, Megan E. Mcnish

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

If you read my last post on the Broadway musical Hamilton, you’ve already read my waxing admiration of the show and might also remember that I listen to the soundtrack non-stop. The musical has shown the world the power that music has as a teaching tool. As someone interested in nineteenth century American history, I long for a Hamilton-esque musical regarding the Civil War era. One of the reasons Hamilton is so successful is its ability to draw connections between past and present issues, and that can be done easily for nineteenth century America. Women’s rights, slavery ...


Our Reconciliationist Pastime: How Baseball Contributed To The Reunification Of White America, Jeffrey L. Lauck Apr 2016

Our Reconciliationist Pastime: How Baseball Contributed To The Reunification Of White America, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

As early as the 1850s, the game of baseball was being referred to as “our national game.” At a time when the nation was being ripped apart at the seams, it served as a relatively new symbol of national identity. Baseball did not fully reach its unifying potential until after a bloody war that pitched North against South. However, these reconciliationist qualities did not strike at the heart of all Americans. [excerpt]


The Literal Reconstruction Of Vmi: Resolved To Be, Kaylyn L. Sawyer Mar 2016

The Literal Reconstruction Of Vmi: Resolved To Be, Kaylyn L. Sawyer

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

This is the last in a three-part series on the legacy of the Civil War at the Virginia Military Institute. You can also check out part one to read about VMI’s struggle for survival in the years immediately after the war and part two for information about the Institute in Civil War memory. [excerpt]


Prostitution And The Civil War, Anika N. Jensen Mar 2016

Prostitution And The Civil War, Anika N. Jensen

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

It was to my slight disappointment that I found out that the term "hooker," one of many referring to prostitutes (or, as they were called during the Civil War era, "public women), is not actually a play on the name of Joseph Hooker, the infamous and promiscuous Union general. Fighting Joe may, however, have helped elevate the term to its current popularity; after all, a certain red light district in Washington, D.C. was dubbed "Hooker’s Division." [excerpt]


Sons Of Our Founding Fathers: Men Of Renowned Lineage And The American Civil War, Ryan M. Nadeau Mar 2016

Sons Of Our Founding Fathers: Men Of Renowned Lineage And The American Civil War, Ryan M. Nadeau

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Political dynasties have always occupied a strange spot within the democracy of the United States. Though the argument is frequently made that the circumstances of one’s birth are irrelevant, and that it is only the ability of a person which propels them through society, it is foolish to ignore the effects that a name can have how a person is judged by society—for better or worse. In the decades following the Revolution, when the descendants and fortunes of the Founding Fathers were still easily identifiable, this was especially true. When you possessed a name like Washington or Adams ...


This Month In Civil War History: March 2016, Jeffrey L. Lauck Mar 2016

This Month In Civil War History: March 2016, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Transcript:

Welcome to The Civil War Institute’s This Month in Civil War History for March.

President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated as the sixteenth President of the United States on March 4th, 1861.

In his address, he appealed to the Southern states, encouraging them to come back into the Union by remarking "though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection."

In closing, he hoped that "the better angels of our nature" would avoid the oncoming war.

Exactly four years later, President Lincoln hummed a different tune at his second inaugural Address. [excerpt]


What I Saw Of The Rally: A Few Observations From The Confederate Flag Protests, Jeffrey L. Lauck Mar 2016

What I Saw Of The Rally: A Few Observations From The Confederate Flag Protests, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

The normally quiet town of Gettysburg was once more disrupted by battle when two groups of protesters went head-to-head over the memory of the Confederate flag. Since the tumult and confusion of that fateful Saturday two weeks ago, many have weighed in on the day’s events with varying degrees of accuracy and distorted perceptions of reality. The following is my account. [excerpt]


Tactical Insight And Sick Burns From A Woman At War: The Diary Of Nadine Turchin, Ryan M. Nadeau Mar 2016

Tactical Insight And Sick Burns From A Woman At War: The Diary Of Nadine Turchin, Ryan M. Nadeau

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

On June 27th, 1863, while camped at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, Nadine Turchin, wife of Brigadier General John Turchin of the Army of the Cumberland, wrote an irate entry in her journal. "Really, I think that the commanding general should take me as his chief of staff," she began, "or at least as his personal advisor." She went on to discuss the movements of her husband’s regiment as they campaigned in the west, criticizing the orders given to him by his superiors that had resulted in several deaths within the regiment and offering her own take on how they should have ...


The Literal Reconstruction Of Vmi: Reunion, Restitution, Remembrance, Kaylyn L. Sawyer Mar 2016

The Literal Reconstruction Of Vmi: Reunion, Restitution, Remembrance, Kaylyn L. Sawyer

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

This is the second in a three-part series on the legacy of the Civil War at the Virginia Military Institute. You can also check out part one to read about VMI’s struggle for survival in the years immediately after the war. Stay tuned for the conclusion of the series. [excerpt]