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The Forgotten 150th: Why The Civil War Sesquicentennial Is Far From Over, Jeffrey L. Lauck Apr 2016

The Forgotten 150th: Why The Civil War Sesquicentennial Is Far From Over, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Last spring, my friends told me that it was the perfect time to get into Civil War reenacting. “The 150th is over,” they said, “No one is going to care about the Civil War anymore, so everyone will be selling all their stuff.” Somehow, this bit of insider trading information meant more to me than just bargain brogans and frock coats. [excerpt]


Prostitution And The Civil War, Anika N. Jensen Mar 2016

Prostitution And The Civil War, Anika N. Jensen

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

It was to my slight disappointment that I found out that the term "hooker," one of many referring to prostitutes (or, as they were called during the Civil War era, "public women), is not actually a play on the name of Joseph Hooker, the infamous and promiscuous Union general. Fighting Joe may, however, have helped elevate the term to its current popularity; after all, a certain red light district in Washington, D.C. was dubbed "Hooker’s Division." [excerpt]


Sons Of Our Founding Fathers: Men Of Renowned Lineage And The American Civil War, Ryan M. Nadeau Mar 2016

Sons Of Our Founding Fathers: Men Of Renowned Lineage And The American Civil War, Ryan M. Nadeau

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Political dynasties have always occupied a strange spot within the democracy of the United States. Though the argument is frequently made that the circumstances of one’s birth are irrelevant, and that it is only the ability of a person which propels them through society, it is foolish to ignore the effects that a name can have how a person is judged by society—for better or worse. In the decades following the Revolution, when the descendants and fortunes of the Founding Fathers were still easily identifiable, this was especially true. When you possessed a name like Washington or Adams ...


This Month In Civil War History: March 2016, Jeffrey L. Lauck Mar 2016

This Month In Civil War History: March 2016, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Transcript:

Welcome to The Civil War Institute’s This Month in Civil War History for March.

President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated as the sixteenth President of the United States on March 4th, 1861.

In his address, he appealed to the Southern states, encouraging them to come back into the Union by remarking "though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection."

In closing, he hoped that "the better angels of our nature" would avoid the oncoming war.

Exactly four years later, President Lincoln hummed a different tune at his second inaugural Address. [excerpt]


What I Saw Of The Rally: A Few Observations From The Confederate Flag Protests, Jeffrey L. Lauck Mar 2016

What I Saw Of The Rally: A Few Observations From The Confederate Flag Protests, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

The normally quiet town of Gettysburg was once more disrupted by battle when two groups of protesters went head-to-head over the memory of the Confederate flag. Since the tumult and confusion of that fateful Saturday two weeks ago, many have weighed in on the day’s events with varying degrees of accuracy and distorted perceptions of reality. The following is my account. [excerpt]


Tactical Insight And Sick Burns From A Woman At War: The Diary Of Nadine Turchin, Ryan M. Nadeau Mar 2016

Tactical Insight And Sick Burns From A Woman At War: The Diary Of Nadine Turchin, Ryan M. Nadeau

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

On June 27th, 1863, while camped at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, Nadine Turchin, wife of Brigadier General John Turchin of the Army of the Cumberland, wrote an irate entry in her journal. "Really, I think that the commanding general should take me as his chief of staff," she began, "or at least as his personal advisor." She went on to discuss the movements of her husband’s regiment as they campaigned in the west, criticizing the orders given to him by his superiors that had resulted in several deaths within the regiment and offering her own take on how they should have ...


A Middle East Perspective: Civil War Memory In Syria And At Home, Anika N. Jensen Mar 2016

A Middle East Perspective: Civil War Memory In Syria And At Home, Anika N. Jensen

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Last summer, while on a trip with the Eisenhower Institute’s Inside the Middle East program, I stood at the Israeli edge of the Golan Heights and heard a bomb explode across the border in Syria. We had spent the day within several miles of the war-ravaged nation with all remaining quiet until that moment, and while none of us wanted to admit it, we had the smallest hope that we might catch a glimpse of the conflict. However, when the sound of the detonation roared across the hills, excitement was replaced by a sense of fear and grief. I ...


Causing Conversation: Civil War Memory In Beyoncé’S “Formation”, Anika N. Jensen Mar 2016

Causing Conversation: Civil War Memory In Beyoncé’S “Formation”, Anika N. Jensen

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Not only did Beyoncé slay in her latest music video, but she got historical. Her single "Formation" touches on feminism, oppression, sexuality, and police brutality, and her video offers a visual representation for the overall theme of African American cultural ownership. It is, of course, an essential message for contemporary discussion, and the formerly-silenced subject is beginning to achieve prevalence in the music industry, but there is something special and bold about Beyoncé’s take on race: by appealing to Civil War memory and forcing viewers to accept the African American struggle for life, freedom, and success, she is shattering ...


Historicizing The Free Speech Debate: Harold Holzer On Lincoln And Censorship, Anika N. Jensen Mar 2016

Historicizing The Free Speech Debate: Harold Holzer On Lincoln And Censorship, Anika N. Jensen

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Before attending Harold Holzer’s Lincoln Lyceum lecture entitled "Lincoln and the Press: Master or Monster?" I really believed that today’s media presence was the craziest this nation had ever seen. Mr. Holzer insisted otherwise. [excerpt]


Challenging Lincoln: How Gettysburg’S Lincoln-Centric Emancipation Narrative Has Overshadowed Local Black History, Jeffrey L. Lauck Feb 2016

Challenging Lincoln: How Gettysburg’S Lincoln-Centric Emancipation Narrative Has Overshadowed Local Black History, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

When it comes to symbols of emancipation, President Abraham Lincoln is king. No other person is more associated with the abolition of slavery than "The Great Emancipator" himself. This holds true in Gettysburg just as much as it does throughout the country. Only last September, Gettysburg College erected a statue of Abraham Lincoln signing the Emancipation Proclamation in the hope that it would "promote the discussion of race relations in America today." Yet when it comes to commemorating and remembering the struggle for emancipation, Lincoln is far from the only face that we should look to in our historic town ...


This Month In Civil War History: February 2016, Jeffrey L. Lauck Feb 2016

This Month In Civil War History: February 2016, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Transcript:

On February 12, 1809, Abraham Lincoln was born in Hodgenville, Kentucky. The self-educated lawyer served in the United States House of Representatives as a delegate from Illinois before being elected as the sixteenth president of the United States.

In February of 1861, the Confederacy formed a government at Montgomery, Alabama and appointed Jefferson Davis as President of the Confederate States of America. [excerpt]


From Russia With Love: John And Nadine Turchin, Ryan M. Nadeau Feb 2016

From Russia With Love: John And Nadine Turchin, Ryan M. Nadeau

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

In August 1856, Ivan Vasilievitch Turchaninov and Nedezhda Dmitrievna Lvow arrived in the United States. The two had been married for only three months, and were both natives of the Russian Empire. Ivan was descended from a family of Cossacks with a strong military background in whose footsteps he followed by attending military school in St. Petersburg. He had served as an army captain during the Crimean War, stationed in the critical port city of Sevastopol, and was part of the forces sent to put down rebellions in both Poland and Hungary. It was while stationed in Russia that he ...


A Soldier And His Nurse: The Star-Crossed Tragedy Of Frank And Arabella Barlow, Jeffrey L. Lauck Feb 2016

A Soldier And His Nurse: The Star-Crossed Tragedy Of Frank And Arabella Barlow, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

This is not a love story ready-made for Hollywood. Rather, it is one more suited for a Shakespearean tragedy. Two newlyweds, on the day after their marriage, were separated by the call for troops in Mr. Lincoln’s War. As was true of so many Civil War couples, only one would survive the war. While you may be thinking to yourself that you’ve heard this story before (and perhaps many of you have), the tale of these two star-crossed lovers does not fit the typical narrative behind the vacant chair. [excerpt]


Lisa Wolfinger, Executive Producer Of Pbs’S Mercy Street, Talks History And Memory, Kevin P. Lavery Feb 2016

Lisa Wolfinger, Executive Producer Of Pbs’S Mercy Street, Talks History And Memory, Kevin P. Lavery

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

This winter, the Gettysburg Compiler will be releasing weekly posts as part of a Mercy Monday feature that will cover issues of medical history, gender and race relations, historical memory, and other themes depicted in the new PBS series Mercy Street.

Recently, I had the opportunity to interview Lisa Wolfinger, the executive producer and co-creator of Mercy Street. She kindly agreed to be interviewed by the Gettysburg Compiler about her work on the series. Wolfinger also participated in a recent conversation on local public radio station WITF’s Smart Talk program alongside the CWI’s Jill Titus and Ian Isherwood ...


Special Collections Roadshow — Episode Eight: Emory Upton’S Tactical Blocks, Meg A. Sutter, Megan E. Mcnish Jan 2016

Special Collections Roadshow — Episode Eight: Emory Upton’S Tactical Blocks, Meg A. Sutter, Megan E. Mcnish

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Special Collections Roadshow was created by the Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College in the Spring of 2014. Although the series usually showcases various artifacts from Special Collections at Gettysburg College, for our eighth episode we went on the road to the US Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, PA.


Sexual Healing: Nurses, Gender, And Victorian Era Intimacy, Anika N. Jensen Jan 2016

Sexual Healing: Nurses, Gender, And Victorian Era Intimacy, Anika N. Jensen

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

In the first episode of the new PBS series Mercy Street, nurse Anne Hastings is seen applying a plaster cast to a wounded soldier’s bare legs before a captivated audience of surgeons and hospital workers. This action seems trivial today, even unquestionable, but as the show progressed and more scenes portrayed this seemingly insignificant concept of touch, of intimacy between a female nurse and her male patients, its true magnitude became apparent. [excerpt]


This Month In Civil War History: January 2016, Jeffrey L. Lauck Jan 2016

This Month In Civil War History: January 2016, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Transcript:

Welcome to The Civil War Institute’s "This Month in Civil War History for January."

In January of 1861, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, and Louisiana joined South Carolina in seceding from the Union. In their articles of secession, the states made explicit references to defending the future of slavery in their reasons for seceding. [excerpt]


The Missing Link: The Search For The Connection Between Young Americans For Freedom And Charles Willoughby, Jeffrey L. Lauck Jan 2016

The Missing Link: The Search For The Connection Between Young Americans For Freedom And Charles Willoughby, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Last semester, Gettysburg College was abuzz with controversy over the ultra-conservative messages that the Young Americans for Freedom organization was spreading around campus. As the Compiler’s unofficial, wannabe muckraker, I wanted to dive into the discussion. My entry point was a rumor that a reactionary Gettysburg College alumnus helped establish the organization in the 1960s. I jumped at the opportunity to uncover the link. [excerpt]


Take Me Out To The Ball Game (And Away From Camp): How Soldiers Used Sports To Cope During War Time, Anika N. Jensen Jan 2016

Take Me Out To The Ball Game (And Away From Camp): How Soldiers Used Sports To Cope During War Time, Anika N. Jensen

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Snowball fights during the Civil War were a pretty big deal.

In fact, sports and fitness in general played a role in shaping ideals of honor, courage, and idolization among the Armies of the Potomac and Northern Virginia, and they proved to have an impact on the life of the individual soldier by distracting him (or possibly her) from the monotonous routine of camp life and establishing bonds of comradeship. [excerpt]


Special Collections Roadshow — Episode Seven: Housewife, Meg A. Sutter, Megan E. Mcnish Jan 2016

Special Collections Roadshow — Episode Seven: Housewife, Meg A. Sutter, Megan E. Mcnish

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Special Collections Roadshow was created by the Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College in the Spring of 2014. It showcases various artifacts from Special Collections at Gettysburg College. The seventh episode features Megan McNish ’16 comparing the housewife from Lewis Tway’s collection to another housewife we just received from Rev. Theodore Schlach’s new collection in Special Collections.


Crack Open A Bottle Of General Lee – A Second Course, Ryan M. Nadeau Dec 2015

Crack Open A Bottle Of General Lee – A Second Course, Ryan M. Nadeau

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Welcome back, fellow historical diners. Last time, you joined me in comparing a fine selection of Union generals to food. Today, we’ll be examining some of their southern counterparts. Let’s dig in!

Robert E. Lee – Aged, Fine Red Wine with a Side of Steak

Consider the following: red wines are often consumed with red meats such as steak. Steak can be enjoyed in any number of ways, from a backyard barbecue to the finest of dining establishments. In this sense, steak is the former Confederacy, ranging as it did from the most rural farmers to the opulent planters ...


This Month In Civil War History: December 2015, Jeffrey L. Lauck Dec 2015

This Month In Civil War History: December 2015, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Transcript:

Welcome to the Civil War Institute’s “This Month in Civil War History” for December.

In December of 1860 delegates met in Columbus, South Carolina and voted in favor of seceding from the Union. In their justification for leaving the Union, the delegates emphasized their fear that the newly elected President Abraham Lincoln would outlaw slavery. [excerpt]


Dead Broets Society: Masculinity In Walt Whitman’S War Verse, Anika N. Jensen Dec 2015

Dead Broets Society: Masculinity In Walt Whitman’S War Verse, Anika N. Jensen

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

There are two images of masculinity in Walt Whitman’s Drum-Taps, his collection of wartime poetry: one, the strong, hardened soldier, the image of manliness, and the other the boyish, rosy-cheeked recruit. Whitman’s sexuality, while not the Victorian social norm, was no secret, and he wrote openly of the hospitalized soldiers during his time as a Union nurse with admiration, affection, and love. Some critics, such as Thomas Wentworth Higginson, castigated Whitman’s queer themes to be overwhelming, distractingly sensual, and "unmanly," while others, like William Sloane Kennedy, dissented, arguing instead that the overt sexuality present in Whitman’s ...


The Oatmeal Brigade: Quaker Life During The Civil War, Anika N. Jensen Dec 2015

The Oatmeal Brigade: Quaker Life During The Civil War, Anika N. Jensen

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Quakers in the Civil War seems like an inherently contradictory idea; the Society of Friends practices pacifism and nonviolence, and, for many, putting money or resources toward war efforts goes against the faith. But tensions were high in 1861, and deviations from Quakerism were made when Friends, both Northern and Southern, had to choose whether to prioritize the sanctity of union, support abolition, or remain neutral. Each of these decisions had its share of repercussions within the religious community, and the Quakers themselves found their mindsets changing as the tide of the war rolled on, whether they chose to fight ...


The Saint Patrick’S Battalion: Loyalty, Nativism, And Identity In The Nineteenth Century And Today, Kevin P. Lavery Dec 2015

The Saint Patrick’S Battalion: Loyalty, Nativism, And Identity In The Nineteenth Century And Today, Kevin P. Lavery

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Two decades before the Irish Brigade covered itself with glory, an earlier unit of Irish immigrants had won renown for its service during the Mexican American War. Calling themselves the Saint Patrick’s Battalion, these men marched under a flag of brilliant emerald decorated with Irish motifs: a harp, a shamrock, and the image of Saint Patrick [excerpt].


Joshua Chamberlain On Mars: Chambermania And Beyond!, Ryan M. Nadeau Dec 2015

Joshua Chamberlain On Mars: Chambermania And Beyond!, Ryan M. Nadeau

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

You don’t need to be a rocket scientist to observe one fact about Mars: it has a lot of rocks. While each is typically given a name based on protocols of scientific classification, many are known by informal, often humorous names like "Grandma" and "Space Ghost." And now on Mars, there’s a rock for fans of Civil War history—"Chamberlain," named of course for Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, the hero of Little Round Top [excerpt].


Lost Cause In The Oval Office: Woodrow Wilson’S Racist Policies And White-Washed Memory Of The Civil War, Jeffrey L. Lauck Dec 2015

Lost Cause In The Oval Office: Woodrow Wilson’S Racist Policies And White-Washed Memory Of The Civil War, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

For the past several weeks, students all across the nation have opened up discussions on race relations on university campuses and in American culture at large. The latest battlefield in the fight for greater inclusion is Princeton University, where protestors from the Black Justice League staged a 32 hour sit-in at the president’s office. Princeton University, traditionally viewed as a bastion of progressivism and liberal ideology, is coming under fire for its reverence for perhaps their most famous graduate, President Woodrow Wilson. Wilson graduated from Princeton University Class of 1879 and served as president of the school from 1902 ...


General Mcclellan Is A Fruitcake And Other Tasteful Metaphors, Ryan M. Nadeau Nov 2015

General Mcclellan Is A Fruitcake And Other Tasteful Metaphors, Ryan M. Nadeau

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

The idea for this post was born from a comment I made while bored and generally sleep deprived on a road trip to the James Buchanan symposium earlier this fall. After some serious historical discussion with my traveling companions, including two other CWI fellows, I made a very non-serious observation. It went something like this:

"You know, I think Buchanan looks a lot like a soft-serve vanilla ice cream cone" [excerpt].


The Grand Parade: Remembering The American Civil War, Elizabeth A. Smith Nov 2015

The Grand Parade: Remembering The American Civil War, Elizabeth A. Smith

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

On November 21, a small contingent from the 26th PEMR or PCG—Gettysburg College’s reenacting group—gathered early in the morning in Union uniform and civilian dress outside of the Appleford Inn. With a flowered wreath in hand, the small group made their way down Chambersburg Street. There, in sight of the Dollar General and the Segway Tour office, they laid the wreath at the base of the monument, which features a young college boy, musket in hand, as he marches off to battle. The group of students read the history of the unit and had their pictures taken ...


Some Small Tribute: How Modern Americans Find Meaning In The National Cemetery, Matthew D. Laroche Nov 2015

Some Small Tribute: How Modern Americans Find Meaning In The National Cemetery, Matthew D. Laroche

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

metery By Matt LaRoche ’17 In anticipation of Remembrance Day and Dedication Day this week, we have asked our Fellows why and how they commemorate the Civil War. Read Megan’s post below, then check back later in the week for more posts on commemoration and remembrance. In my last post, I appealed to the public to make good on the tragedies of Gettysburg in the same broad vein as President Clinton’s appeal at the 20th anniversary of the genocide at Srebrenica—to make the tragedy a “sacred trust” towards a better future. Needless to say, the material of ...