Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in History

The Role Of Music In Assimilation Of Students At The Carlisle Indian Industrial School, Abigail C. Winston May 2019

The Role Of Music In Assimilation Of Students At The Carlisle Indian Industrial School, Abigail C. Winston

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

Despite the vast research on the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, music is often overshadowed by the recognition of the school’s athletic program in the discussion of the place of extracurricular activities in Native American assimilation. This paper discusses the role of music in the assimilation of students at the Carlisle Indian School, drawing from the fields of both history and ethnomusicology to demonstrate that music had a much more profound effect on assimilation than athletics. Through a discussion on the differences between Native American and Western art music, and the disparity between their functions in society, it is clear ...


Best Of Intentions?: Rinderpest, Containment Practices, And Rebellion In Rhodesia In 1896, Brandon R. Katzung Hokanson May 2019

Best Of Intentions?: Rinderpest, Containment Practices, And Rebellion In Rhodesia In 1896, Brandon R. Katzung Hokanson

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

Rinderpest was a deadly bovine virus that plagued cattle herds accross Europe and Asia for centuries. In the late 1880s to early 1890s, the virus found its way to Africa, where it wiped out thousands of non-immune cattle herds belonging to African pastoralists and agriculturalists. By February 1896, the virus had crossed the Rhodesian border along the Zambezi River and began killing off cattle owned by ethnic groups that included the Matabele and the Shona, as well as cattle owned by white settlers. In an effort to contain the virus, the British South African Company consulted with colonial officials in ...


Victoria: The Girl Who Would Become Queen, Lindsay R. Richwine May 2019

Victoria: The Girl Who Would Become Queen, Lindsay R. Richwine

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

This research reviews the early life of Queen Victoria and through analysis of her sequestered childhood and lack of parental figures explains her reliance later in life on mentors and advisors. Additionally, the research reviews previous biographical portrayals of the Queen and refutes the claim that she was merely a receptacle for the ideas of the men around her while still acknowledging and explaining her dependence on these advisors.


Destroying The Right Arm Of Rebellion: Lincoln’S Emancipation Proclamation, Benjamin Pontz May 2019

Destroying The Right Arm Of Rebellion: Lincoln’S Emancipation Proclamation, Benjamin Pontz

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation was a gamble. If it were to succeed, it could cripple the economy of the South, decimating its war effort, drive the border states to accept compensated emancipation, ending slavery as an institution in the United States, and accelerate the end of the war, ensuring the endurance of the United States of America. If it were to fail, it could spur the border states to secede, galvanizing the South, render Abraham Lincoln a political pariah with two years remaining in his term, deflating the North, and encourage European states to broker a two-state solution in North ...


A Race To The Stars And Beyond: How The Soviet Union’S Success In The Space Race Helped Serve As A Projection Of Communist Power, Jack H. Lashendock May 2019

A Race To The Stars And Beyond: How The Soviet Union’S Success In The Space Race Helped Serve As A Projection Of Communist Power, Jack H. Lashendock

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

In the modern era, the notion of space travel is generally one of greater acceptance and ease than in times previously. Moreover, a greater number of nations (and now even private entities) have the technological capabilities to launch manned and unmanned missions into Earth’s Orbit and beyond. 70 years ago, this ability did not exist and humanity was simply an imprisoned species on this planet. The course of humanity’s then-present and the collective future was forever altered when, in 1957, the Soviet Union successfully launched the world’s first satellite into space, setting off a decades-long completion with ...


Letter From The Editors, Brandon R. Katzung Hokanson, Abigal K. Major May 2019

Letter From The Editors, Brandon R. Katzung Hokanson, Abigal K. Major

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

The Gettysburg Historical Journal embodies the History Department’s dedication to diverse learning and excellence in academics. Each year, the journal publishes the top student work in a range of topics across the spectrum of academic disciplines with different mythological approaches to the study of history. In the word of Marc Bloch, author of The Historian’s Craft, “history is neither watchmaking nor cabinet construction. It is an endeavor toward better understanding.” In the spirit of this maxim, our authors strive to elucidate the many facets of human societies and cultures. Whether this research is focused on politics, religion, economics ...


Featured Piece, Katheryn E. Whitcomb May 2019

Featured Piece, Katheryn E. Whitcomb

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

This year’s feature piece was written by Professor Kathryn Whitcomb who is new to Gettysburg College’s Department of Classics. In addition to Classics courses, she has taught courses that have been cross-listed with the History Department and thus adds to the diversity that make the historical field so great and broadens the horizons of historical scholarship to her students.


Front Matter May 2019

Front Matter

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

Front Matter of the Gettysburg Historical Journal 2019


Gettysburg Historical Journal 2019 May 2019

Gettysburg Historical Journal 2019

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

Complete issue of The Gettysburg Historical Journal 2019.