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Review Of The Life And Letters Of Philip Quaque, The First African Anglican Missionary Edited By Vincent Carretta And Ty M. Reese, Edward Andrews Dec 2012

Review Of The Life And Letters Of Philip Quaque, The First African Anglican Missionary Edited By Vincent Carretta And Ty M. Reese, Edward Andrews

Edward E. Andrews

Reviews the book The Life and Letters of Philip Quaque, the First African Anglican Missionary (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2010) by Philip Quaque, edited by Vincent Carretta and Ty M. Reese.


The Crossings Of Occramar Marycoo, Or Newport Gardner, Edward Andrews Dec 2012

The Crossings Of Occramar Marycoo, Or Newport Gardner, Edward Andrews

Edward E. Andrews

No abstract provided.


“Africa’S Place In World Christianity: Towards A Theology Of Inter-Cultural Friendship”, Stan Chu Ilo Dec 2012

“Africa’S Place In World Christianity: Towards A Theology Of Inter-Cultural Friendship”, Stan Chu Ilo

Stan Chu Ilo

No abstract provided.


“Towards An African Theology Of Reconciliation: A Missiological Reflection On The Instrumentum Laboris Of The Second African Synod”, Stan Chu Ilo Oct 2012

“Towards An African Theology Of Reconciliation: A Missiological Reflection On The Instrumentum Laboris Of The Second African Synod”, Stan Chu Ilo

Stan Chu Ilo

No abstract provided.


“The Second African Synod And The Challenges Of Reconciliation, Justice, And Peace In Africa’S Social Context: A Missionary Theological Praxis Of Reconciliation—Part 2", Stan Chu Ilo Jun 2012

“The Second African Synod And The Challenges Of Reconciliation, Justice, And Peace In Africa’S Social Context: A Missionary Theological Praxis Of Reconciliation—Part 2", Stan Chu Ilo

Stan Chu Ilo

No abstract provided.


The Eritrean War, Richard Lobban Apr 2012

The Eritrean War, Richard Lobban

Richard A Lobban

With kidnappings, major hostilities and violence the world is beginning to learn of a smoldering conflict in the Horn of Africa. Yet for those who have followed the fourteen-year guerrilla war the outbreak of heavy fighting in early 1975 comes as little surprise. The Eritrean Liberation Front has only brought greater attention to this movement for the restoration of national sovereignty. For those who have probed the history of the region, it should be clear that Eritrea has probably never been fully integrated into Ethiopia proper. In this article attention is focused initially on some geographic and historical basics.


Guinea-Bissau, Richard Lobban Apr 2012

Guinea-Bissau, Richard Lobban

Richard A Lobban

On 24 September 1973 history was made in Africa. The first sub-Saharan African nation unilaterally declared its sovereignty from European colonialism following a protracted armed struggle. Most African nations gained their independence from colonial powers by negotiation and peaceful transfer of authority. True enough, this transfer was sometimes linked with prolonged periods of demonstrations, strikes, and nationalist propagandizing, but with the exception of Algeria (and perhaps Ethiopia) there were no wars of national liberation which led to a declaration of independence until Guinea-Bissau. The implications of this move are immense.


War Clouds On The Horn Of Africa, Richard Lobban Apr 2012

War Clouds On The Horn Of Africa, Richard Lobban

Richard A Lobban

To review a book published five years ago describing a region in great turbulence is a great challenge. As one of those who has also written on aspects of the Horn of Africa it is tragically clear that the region's hostilities have brought misery and death for thousands. Resting with their remains are countless prophecies and predictions which had sought to analyze the latest events. These remarks may sound like defensive apologies of the author of this book, but I will defend him by assessing the difficulty of interpreting a dynamic and volatile region in the paroxysms of radical ...


Black Athena Writes Back, Richard Lobban Apr 2012

Black Athena Writes Back, Richard Lobban

Richard A Lobban

Martin Beral has been defending Black Athena since 1987. By now, most scholars have drawn their own conclusions in various forums. In short, Bernal seeks to overthrow the dominant paradigm about the connections of Greco-Roman civilization to Egypt and the Near East. He attacked its logic and methodology and criticized possible contamination with anti-Semitism and reluctance to see Egyptian civilization, located in Africa, as an influence upon Greek civilization. I looked forward to the logic and evidence of his defense and especially to learn of any new ideas that Beral might present.


“The Second African Synod And The Challenges Of Reconciliation, Justice, And Peace In Africa’S Social Context: A Missionary Theological Praxis Of Reconciliation—Part 1”, Stan Chu Ilo Mar 2012

“The Second African Synod And The Challenges Of Reconciliation, Justice, And Peace In Africa’S Social Context: A Missionary Theological Praxis Of Reconciliation—Part 1”, Stan Chu Ilo

Stan Chu Ilo

No abstract provided.


The Cabra Dominican Sisters And The ‘Open Schools’ Movement In Apartheid South Africa, Margaret Kelly, Catherine Higgs Feb 2012

The Cabra Dominican Sisters And The ‘Open Schools’ Movement In Apartheid South Africa, Margaret Kelly, Catherine Higgs

Catherine Higgs

In January 1976, the Cabra Dominican Sisters in South Africa and the Association of Women Religious (AWR), with the support of the Southern African Catholic Bishops’ Conference (SACBC), opened their schools to students of all races in direct contravention of apartheid law. This radical action was informed by their dedication to the Dominican motto ‘veritas’ (truth) and by the desire ‘to give practical Christian witness to social justice’ in a revolutionary situation. In opening their schools, the Cabra Dominicans joined the broad liberation movement that helped to crack the façade of the apartheid state and ultimately led to its dismantling.


Springtime For Freedom Of Religion Or Belief: Will Newly Democratic Arab States Guarantee International Human Rights Norms Or Perpetuate Their Violation?, Robert Blitt Dec 2011

Springtime For Freedom Of Religion Or Belief: Will Newly Democratic Arab States Guarantee International Human Rights Norms Or Perpetuate Their Violation?, Robert Blitt

Robert C. Blitt

The Arab Spring has generated unprecedented and seismic political and social upheaval across the Arab world. The reasons for the outbreak of widespread and vociferous public protest are myriad, but generally understood as including long-simmering resentment of government corruption and repression, underwhelming economic development, chronic unemployment and poor respect for human rights, including the treatment of individuals and groups affiliated with political manifestations of Islam. Despite the initial drama surrounding the street rallies, two years on, the pace of change has grown fitful and uncertain. The purpose of this chapter is to consider one narrow aspect of the Arab Spring ...


Chocolate Islands: Cocoa, Slavery, And Colonial Africa, Catherine Higgs Dec 2011

Chocolate Islands: Cocoa, Slavery, And Colonial Africa, Catherine Higgs

Catherine Higgs

In Chocolate Islands: Cocoa, Slavery, and Colonial Africa, Catherine Higgs traces the early-twentieth-century journey of the Englishman Joseph Burtt to the Portuguese colony of São Tomé and Príncipe—the chocolate islands—through Angola and Mozambique, and finally to British Southern Africa. Burtt had been hired by the chocolate firm Cadbury Brothers Limited to determine if the cocoa it was buying from the islands had been harvested by slave laborers forcibly recruited from Angola, an allegation that became one of the grand scandals of the early colonial era. Burtt spent six months on São Tomé and Príncipe and a year in ...


Paradoxes Of American Development Diplomacy In The Early Cold War Period, Edward Kissi Dec 2011

Paradoxes Of American Development Diplomacy In The Early Cold War Period, Edward Kissi

Edward Kissi

No abstract provided.


French Caribbeans In Africa: Diasporic Connections And Colonial Administration, 1880-1939, Veronique Helenon Feb 2011

French Caribbeans In Africa: Diasporic Connections And Colonial Administration, 1880-1939, Veronique Helenon

Veronique Helenon

This is the first book-length study of the French Caribbean presence in Africa, and serves as a unique contribution to the field of African Diaspora and Colonial studies. By using administrative records, newspapers, and interviews, Véronique Hélénon explores the French Caribbean presence in the colonial administration in Africa before World War II. The phenomenon of this colonial administration is an especially productive site for understanding the complex relations established both within the African Diaspora and with the French colonial power.


“Beginning Afresh From Christ In The Search For Abundant Life In Africa” In Stan Chu Ilo, Et Al, Ed. , The Church As Salt And Light: Path To An African Ecclesiology Of Abundant Life, Stan Chu Ilo Dec 2010

“Beginning Afresh From Christ In The Search For Abundant Life In Africa” In Stan Chu Ilo, Et Al, Ed. , The Church As Salt And Light: Path To An African Ecclesiology Of Abundant Life, Stan Chu Ilo

Stan Chu Ilo

No abstract provided.


African Teachers On The Colonial Frontier: Tswana Evangelists And Their Communities During The Nineteenth Century, Stephen Volz Dec 2010

African Teachers On The Colonial Frontier: Tswana Evangelists And Their Communities During The Nineteenth Century, Stephen Volz

Stephen Volz

n/a


The Bottom Up Journey Of 'Defamation Of Religion' From Muslim States To The United Nations: A Case Study Of The Migration Of Anti-Constitutional Ideas, Robert Blitt Dec 2010

The Bottom Up Journey Of 'Defamation Of Religion' From Muslim States To The United Nations: A Case Study Of The Migration Of Anti-Constitutional Ideas, Robert Blitt

Robert C. Blitt

This chapter is intended to elaborate on the existing academic literature addressing the migration of constitutional ideas. Through an examination of ongoing efforts to enshrine “defamation of religion” as a violation of international human rights, the author confirms that the phenomenon of migration is not restricted to positive constitutional norms, but rather also encompasses negative ideas that ultimately may serve to undermine international and domestic constitutionalism. More specifically, the case study demonstrates that the movement of anti-constitutional ideas is not restricted to the domain of “international security” law, and further, that the vertical axis linking international and domestic law is ...


Embracing Activism In Apartheid South Africa: The Sisters Of Mercy In Bophuthatswana, 1974–94, Catherine Higgs, Jean Evans Jun 2008

Embracing Activism In Apartheid South Africa: The Sisters Of Mercy In Bophuthatswana, 1974–94, Catherine Higgs, Jean Evans

Catherine Higgs

In South Africa in the latter half of the twentieth century, the Church shifted from a stance of seeming complicity with the government's racist policies to a more active role with the country's peoples. Religious congregations such as the Sisters of Mercy, Johannesburg, moved to increase their activities in areas such as justice and peace, hunger relief, and especially education and skills training. This article examines the Sisters' varied work with displaced peoples in Bophuthatswana from 1974 to 1994.


The Face Of Africa: Looking Beyond The Shadows, Stan Chu Ilo Dec 2007

The Face Of Africa: Looking Beyond The Shadows, Stan Chu Ilo

Stan Chu Ilo

No abstract provided.


The Black Metropolis In The Twenty-First Century: Race, Power And The Politics Of Place, Robert Bullard Dec 2006

The Black Metropolis In The Twenty-First Century: Race, Power And The Politics Of Place, Robert Bullard

Robert D Bullard

This book brings together key essays that seek to make visible and expand our understanding of the role of government (policies, programs, and investments) in shaping cities and metropolitan regions; the costs and consequences of uneven urban and regional growth patterns; suburban sprawl and public health, transportation, and economic development; and the enduring connection of place, space, and race in the era of increased globalization. Whether intended or unintended, many government policies (housing, transportation, land use, environmental, economic development, education, etc.) have aided and in some cases subsidized suburban sprawl, job flight, and spatial mismatch; concentrated urban poverty; and heightened ...


Why The Rwandan Genocide Seemed Like A Drive-By Shooting: The Crisis Of Race, Culture, And Policy In The African Diaspora, Seneca Vaught Dec 2006

Why The Rwandan Genocide Seemed Like A Drive-By Shooting: The Crisis Of Race, Culture, And Policy In The African Diaspora, Seneca Vaught

Seneca Vaught

From the American perspective, the Rwandan genocide developed amidst a cultural and racial crisis of the 1990s. The American attitude towards the crisis in Kigali provides a complex historical case study on how race and culture have profound and often-ignored policy implications. Specifically, the lack of American intervention in Rwanda reveals the complexity race and policy in American history and the shared fates of Africans throughout the world. Taken as a whole, the domestic cultural background of the early 1990s, including the rise of gangsta rap, rioting, and the dilemma of "black-on-black crime," collectively influenced American policy towards Africa at ...


Zenzele: African Women’S Self-Help Organizations In South Africa, 1927-1998, Catherine Higgs Nov 2004

Zenzele: African Women’S Self-Help Organizations In South Africa, 1927-1998, Catherine Higgs

Catherine Higgs

The Zenzele clubs of the Eastern Cape of South Africa, which date from the late 1920s, were founded by mission-educated African women who sought to improve the lives of rural African women by enhancing their subsistence farming and cooking skills and educating them about household cleanliness, basic child care, and health care. Unlike associations for African women in British colonial Africa, Zenzele clubs did not evolve into political organizations. In the white-run segregated and apartheid states that persisted through 1994, Zenzele women did not engage in direct political action; rather, they sought to unite African women across class and ethnic ...


Who Will Watch The Watchdogs?: International Human Rights Nongovernmental Organizations And The Case For Regulation, Robert Blitt Dec 2003

Who Will Watch The Watchdogs?: International Human Rights Nongovernmental Organizations And The Case For Regulation, Robert Blitt

Robert C. Blitt

Human rights nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have become a fixture within the international system and a driving force for creating and enforcing human rights norms at international law. This essay examines the growth of human rights NGOs and argues that the industry is in urgent need of formal regulation. After assessing the failure of informal market controls for ensuring accountability within the human rights NGO sector, this paper applies a law and economics consumer protection model to underscore the need for more formal regulation. However, rather than advance a case for government intervention, this paper proposes that human rights NGOs themselves ...


Stepping Forward: Black Women In Africa And The Americas Dec 2001

Stepping Forward: Black Women In Africa And The Americas

Catherine Higgs

A unique and important study, Stepping Forward examines the experiences of nineteenth- and twentieth-century black women in Africa and African diaspora communities from a variety of perspectives in a number of different settings.

This wide-ranging collection designed for classroom use explores the broad themes that have shaped black women's goals, options, and responses: religion, education, political activism, migration, and cultural transformation. Essays by leading scholars in the field examine the lives of black women in the United States and the Caribbean Basin; in the white settler societies of Kenya, Zimbabwe, and South Africa; and in the black settler societies ...


Fact And Fiction In "God's Bit Of Wood", James Jones Dec 1999

Fact And Fiction In "God's Bit Of Wood", James Jones

James Jones

No abstract provided.


The Ghost Of Equality: The Public Lives Of D. D. T. Jabavu Of South Africa, 1885–1959, Catherine Higgs Dec 1996

The Ghost Of Equality: The Public Lives Of D. D. T. Jabavu Of South Africa, 1885–1959, Catherine Higgs

Catherine Higgs

No abstract provided.