Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in History

Wku Library Special Collections & Wku Archives Genealogy Research, Suellyn Lathrop Sep 2013

Wku Library Special Collections & Wku Archives Genealogy Research, Suellyn Lathrop

Suellyn Lathrop

Research guide to genealogical materials in the WKU Library Special Collections and WKU Archives. Revised 6/2016.


Wku Library Special Collections & Kentucky Museum Research Strategies, Suellyn Lathrop Jan 2011

Wku Library Special Collections & Kentucky Museum Research Strategies, Suellyn Lathrop

Suellyn Lathrop

Research strategies developed for use in the WKU Library Special Collections and Kentucky Museum. Revised June 2016.


Speak Up: It's Leap Year!, Lynn E. Niedermeier Aug 2007

Speak Up: It's Leap Year!, Lynn E. Niedermeier

Lynn E. Niedermeier

The legend that on leap year day (February 29) a man was obligated to accept a woman's proposal of marriage dates back many generations. At WKU, the tradition translated into Leap Year Dances and teas, to which women students invited the young men of their choice. The introduction of Sadie Hawkins Day, inspired by the comic strip "L'il Abner," gave a new and lively twist to this female prerogative.


Wku And The Pleasant J. Potter College: A Shared Heritage, Lynn E. Niedermeier Jul 2007

Wku And The Pleasant J. Potter College: A Shared Heritage, Lynn E. Niedermeier

Lynn E. Niedermeier

Opened in 1889, the Pleasant J. Potter College for Young Ladies was the first occupant of “the Hill” that is now home to Western Kentucky University. Day and boarding students pursued a liberal arts curriculum at this fashionable private school. Down the hill on College Street, at Henry Hardin Cherry’s Western Kentucky State Normal School (chartered in 1906), students often came from more humble backgrounds to study in a coeducational setting. Nevertheless, when Potter College closed in 1909 and WKU purchased its property, it absorbed some of the traditions of the young ladies’ college it replaced.


A 1908 Interview With The Author Of "Aunt Jane Of Kentucky", Lynn E. Niedermeier Dec 2004

A 1908 Interview With The Author Of "Aunt Jane Of Kentucky", Lynn E. Niedermeier

Lynn E. Niedermeier

Bowling Green native Lida Calvert Obenchain wrote popular fiction and campaigned for woman suffrage. Interviewed after her first book of stories, Aunt Jane of Kentucky, was published under her pen name "Eliza Calvert Hall," Lida spoke about her family, literature, women's rights, and her work for the Kentucky Equal Rights Association. The interview, conducted by journalist Ewing Galloway, is reproduced here, with annotations to amplify the content.