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Full-Text Articles in History

Sexual Dimorphism In Homo Erectus Inferred From 1.5 Ma Footprints Near Ileret, Kenya, Brian Villmoare, Kevin G. Hatala, William Jungers May 2019

Sexual Dimorphism In Homo Erectus Inferred From 1.5 Ma Footprints Near Ileret, Kenya, Brian Villmoare, Kevin G. Hatala, William Jungers

Anthropology Faculty Publications

Sexual dimorphism can be one of the most important indicators of social behavior in fossil species, but the effects of time averaging, geographic variation, and differential preservation can complicate attempts to determine this measure from preserved skeletal anatomy. Here we present an alternative, using footprints from near Ileret, Kenya, to assess the sexual dimorphism of presumptive African Homo erectus at 1.5 Ma. Footprint sites have several unique advantages not typically available to fossils: a single surface can sample a population over a very brief time (in this case likely not more than a single day), and the data are ...


Beyond Suffrage: Intermarriage, Land, And Meanings Of Citizenship And Marital Naturalization/Expatriation In The United States, Shiori Yamamoto May 2019

Beyond Suffrage: Intermarriage, Land, And Meanings Of Citizenship And Marital Naturalization/Expatriation In The United States, Shiori Yamamoto

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

This dissertation investigates how the laws of marital naturalization/expatriation, namely the Citizenship Act of 1855, the Expatriation Act of 1907, and the Cable Act of 1922 and its amendments throughout the 1930s, impacted the lives of women who married foreigners, especially in the American West, and demonstrates how women directly and indirectly challenged the practice of marital naturalization/expatriation. Those laws demanded women who married foreigners take the nationality of their husbands depending on the race of women and their husbands, making married women’s citizenship dependent on that of their husbands. Particularly under the Expatriation Act of 1907 ...


Case Study: Armenian And Cuban Ethnic Interest Groups In American Foreign Policy, Harry H. Terzian Dec 2018

Case Study: Armenian And Cuban Ethnic Interest Groups In American Foreign Policy, Harry H. Terzian

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

Current academic research has moved away from comparative models as a mechanism by which to assess and understand socio-political as well as historical phenomena. In addition, comparative analysis when it comes to addressing ethnic lobbies is almost nonexistent within contemporary research. This work implements a comparative framework and as a result has unlocked a new approach when addressing ethnic advocacy organizations. The purpose of this research is to assess and document the history and impact of both Armenian and Cuban ethnic interest groups within the United States. Specifically, focusing upon the Armenian National Committee of America and the Cuban American ...


Power And Authority Of Royal Queen Mothers: Juxtaposing The French Queen Regent And The Ottoman Validé Sultan During The Early Modern Period, Reneé N. Langlois May 2018

Power And Authority Of Royal Queen Mothers: Juxtaposing The French Queen Regent And The Ottoman Validé Sultan During The Early Modern Period, Reneé N. Langlois

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

Women and their relationship to sovereignty, during the early modern era has become a rapidly growing topic, given that during this period an unprecedented number of women rose to high positions of power. This paper aims to compare the lives of the queen regents in France with their counterparts, the validé sultans in the Ottoman Empire, over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, when both groups of royal women acquired substantial power. Although these women were prohibited from ruling in their own right, the paper explores the ways in which queen regents and validé sultans used both official ...


From Bison To Cattle: The Ecology Of The Southern Plains 1500-1750, Jenni Tifft-Ochoa Jan 2018

From Bison To Cattle: The Ecology Of The Southern Plains 1500-1750, Jenni Tifft-Ochoa

Calvert Undergraduate Research Awards

Bison made their home on the Southern Plains for millennia. However, their migratory patterns began to shift in the 17th and 18th centuries. My research investigated what caused this drastic shift and how it had far reaching effects on the ecology of the Southern Plains. Using archives from two prominent Catholic priests, I began to piece together why the bison left the Southern Plains. Rather than focus on the Europeans as the main players, I instead focused on the Indigenous peoples, the animals, and the land as the centralized actors in this project. I discovered that the introduction ...


A Historical Case Study Of Title Ix In Nevada: An Excellent Investment In Our Youth, Jason Clark Dec 2017

A Historical Case Study Of Title Ix In Nevada: An Excellent Investment In Our Youth, Jason Clark

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

The purpose of this study was to examine and document the history of Title IX in the American West, specifically at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and at Clark County School District (CCSD) in Las Vegas, Nevada. This thesis contends that since the late nineteenth-century, women have utilized sports as a method to shed discriminatory stereotypes, fight for inclusion, and promote gender equality. In addition, the progressive actions of educational administrators and community leaders regarding Title IX make both UNR and CCSD exceptional institutions for gender equality. This thesis contains six chapters including the introduction and conclusion. Chapter 1 ...


Family, Housing, And The Political Geography Of Gay Liberation In Los Angeles County, 1960-1986, Ian M. Baldwin May 2016

Family, Housing, And The Political Geography Of Gay Liberation In Los Angeles County, 1960-1986, Ian M. Baldwin

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

This study examines the gay liberation movement in Los Angeles County through the lens of housing rights. It illustrates how sexual justice activism evolved in tandem with the fates of the welfare state and urban politics. Like racial minorities, queers have been stymied by economic barriers. Beginning in the 1930s, federal housing agencies established “family” requirements to housing subsidies, which the state defined through biology or marriage. In L.A. County, activists worked to overcome this heteronormative barrier at the grassroots and within the political establishment. Binding gay liberation to economic and family justice, queers opened housing shelters and social ...


"Mother, I Will": Female Subjectivity And Religious Vision In The Brontës Novels, Amanda Scott May 2016

"Mother, I Will": Female Subjectivity And Religious Vision In The Brontës Novels, Amanda Scott

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

Anne, Charlotte, and Emily Brontë have long attracted sustained critical attention, in

large part because of their strong female protagonists. These strong-willed women self-assuredly reject oppression and model new paradigms for the Victorian woman to empower her subjectivity. This subjectivity serves, in turn, not only as the ability to form and express views counter to outworn social prescriptions, but it also serves as the centralized interior focus that allows their protagonists to think of themselves as the foremost subjects of their lives, rather than see themselves as pawns to be moved about in the games of patriarchal hierarchy. This study ...


The Painted Motifs Of Cypriot Ceramic Art: A Study Of Iconography & Identity, Paige Bockman Dec 2015

The Painted Motifs Of Cypriot Ceramic Art: A Study Of Iconography & Identity, Paige Bockman

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

The aim of this master’s thesis is to explore the iconography of Chalcolithic (c. 3900-2300 cal. BC) Cyprus using ceramic motifs and identify their potential use in revealing differences between the cultural identity present at archaeological sites, as well as the possible causes of such variation. By exploring the existence and origins of subtle differences between the iconographic repertoires of related sites, the study seeks a better understanding of the movement of both ideas and symbols, and how the meaning of symbols developed within the context of a site.

Currently, Cypriot Chalcolithic sites are believed to be largely homogeneous ...


Creating The Black California Dream: Virna Canson And The Black Freedom Struggle In The Golden State’S Capital, 1940-1988, Kendra M. Gage Aug 2015

Creating The Black California Dream: Virna Canson And The Black Freedom Struggle In The Golden State’S Capital, 1940-1988, Kendra M. Gage

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

This dissertation examines the black struggle for racial equality in the Golden State’s capital from 1940-1988 and an integral leader of the movement, Virna Canson. Canson fought for nearly fifty years to dismantle discriminatory practices in housing, education, employment and worked to protect consumers. Her lifetime of activism reveals a different set of key issues people focused on at the grassroots level and shows how the fight for freedom in California differed from the South because the state’s discriminatory practices were harder to pinpoint. Her work and the larger black community’s activism in Sacramento also reveals how ...


Mcnair Research Journal - Summer 2015, Kelly Abuali, Starr Bailey, Krystal Courtney D. Belmonte, Brittaney Benson-Townsend, Jennifer Bolick, Mihaela A. Ciulei, Ashley Crisp, Daniel N. Erosa, Richard V. Foster, Gisele Braga Goertz, Michael A. Langhardt, Kara Osborne, Julienne Jochel Paraiso, Shawn M. Rosen, Bella V. Smith, Jeevake Attapattu, Ernesto H. Bedoy, Michael G. Curtis, Wanda Inthavong, Marielle Leo, Primrose Martin, Tamieka Meadows, Rosa Perez, Jessica Recarey, Shea Silver, Linda Tompkins Jan 2015

Mcnair Research Journal - Summer 2015, Kelly Abuali, Starr Bailey, Krystal Courtney D. Belmonte, Brittaney Benson-Townsend, Jennifer Bolick, Mihaela A. Ciulei, Ashley Crisp, Daniel N. Erosa, Richard V. Foster, Gisele Braga Goertz, Michael A. Langhardt, Kara Osborne, Julienne Jochel Paraiso, Shawn M. Rosen, Bella V. Smith, Jeevake Attapattu, Ernesto H. Bedoy, Michael G. Curtis, Wanda Inthavong, Marielle Leo, Primrose Martin, Tamieka Meadows, Rosa Perez, Jessica Recarey, Shea Silver, Linda Tompkins

McNair Journal

Journal articles based on research conducted by undergraduate students in the McNair Scholars Program

Table of Contents

Biography of Dr. Ronald E. McNair

Statements:

Dr. Neal J. Smatresk, UNLV President

Dr. Juanita P. Fain, Vice President of Student Affairs

Dr. William W. Sullivan, Associate Vice President for Retention and Outreach

Mr. Keith Rogers, Deputy Executive Director of the Center for Academic Enrichment and Outreach

McNair Scholars Institute Staff


No Prejudice Here: Racism, Resistance, And The Struggle For Equality In Denver, 1947-1994, Summer Marie Cherland Dec 2014

No Prejudice Here: Racism, Resistance, And The Struggle For Equality In Denver, 1947-1994, Summer Marie Cherland

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

This study chronicles a story of civil rights that has been left untold until now. Recent scholarship contributing to the history of the "long civil rights movement" has reframed our understanding of civil rights beyond the years of the late 1950s and early 1960s. In addition, it has also demonstrated that civil rights activity occurred in regions other than the South. However, most work on the long civil rights movement demonstrates that activism among blacks began much earlier than the Brown v. Board Supreme Court case and instead, was a part of a longer freedom struggle that, in many ways ...


Billy Graham Comes To Las Vegas: Faith At Work On The Strip, Michelle Robinson Apr 2014

Billy Graham Comes To Las Vegas: Faith At Work On The Strip, Michelle Robinson

Occasional Papers

An exploration of Billy Graham’s 1978 Christian Crusade in Las Vegas, this paper argues that the Billy Graham Evangelical Association (BGEA) developed distinctly Vegas-styled evangelical tactics to address challenges posed by the city’s fragile religious infrastructure and competing attractions on the Las Vegas Strip. To organize a spectacular and successful ecumenical event that would garner local and national attention, BGEA simultaneously leveraged popular notions of Vegas as “Sin City” while recruiting Christian evangelicals from beyond the city proper to temporarily transform the religious ecology of the Strip.


A Historical Comparative Analysis Of Executions In The United States From 1608 To 2009, Emily Jean Abili Dec 2013

A Historical Comparative Analysis Of Executions In The United States From 1608 To 2009, Emily Jean Abili

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

The death penalty has been a contested issue throughout American history. The United States has been executing offenders since Jamestown became a colony in 1608 (Allen & Clubb, 2008). Since that time, many issues have been raised about the death penalty including whether or not it is moral, discriminatory, or a deterrent.

This study examines the history of executions, including lynchings, in the United States from 1608 to 2009 using a variety of sociological theories on law and society. Some of the research questions that guide this project are:

* What is the nature of change in the relative prevalence of legal ...


Claiming Citizenship: Las Vegas' Conventional Women's Organizations Establishing Citizenship Through Civic Engagement, Cynthia Cicero May 2013

Claiming Citizenship: Las Vegas' Conventional Women's Organizations Establishing Citizenship Through Civic Engagement, Cynthia Cicero

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

Many historians of American women portray women's organized civic engagement and work to attain social, economic, and legal equality as feminism. American feminism has been expanded and applied in scholarship. The American feminists of the 1960s wanted to alter the male power structure and redefine conventional notions of womanhood. However, many middle-class women who participated in community and civic organizations valued their roles as wives, mothers, and homemakers, expressing their citizenship and community work as an extension of these roles. Their motivation in pursuing equality was to gain full citizenship status.

In this thesis, I argue that viewing women ...


Conclusion-Cola And Cartoons: A Showcase Of Freshman Research At Unlv, Cian T. Mcmahon Dec 2012

Conclusion-Cola And Cartoons: A Showcase Of Freshman Research At Unlv, Cian T. Mcmahon

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

The decisions we make about politics and society are influenced by what we see and hear in the news. That is why political cartoons are so important. They present clear opinions on complicated matters in ways that transcend everyday language.


“Colonists And Convicts”, Dakota Hoskins Dec 2012

“Colonists And Convicts”, Dakota Hoskins

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

The “Colonists and Convicts” cartoon debuted in the British magazine called Punch in October 1864. The cartoon brings to life the bickering that occurred between the Australian colonists and the British officers. It gives off the idea that the colonists were more annoyed with the officers than the convicts themselves. The rugged Australians were fed up with being forced fed the British rulings.


“The Most Recently Discovered Wild Beast”, Jenelle Tamio Dec 2012

“The Most Recently Discovered Wild Beast”, Jenelle Tamio

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

This Political cartoon is labeled "The Most Recently Discovered Wild Beast.” This cartoon depicts Irish as jail bound hooligans. In this political cartoon simianization is used among the Irish-American. Simianization is the way cartoonists portray humans as having monkey like features.


“Welcome To All”, Samantha Hamika Dec 2012

“Welcome To All”, Samantha Hamika

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

In the cartoon “Welcome to All” by Joseph Keppler published in the magazine Puck on April 28, 1880, it portrays Uncle Sam standing in front of an ark with his arms open to immigrants, who are lined up in front of the ark. There are signs next to the ark that claim all good things about America that other countries don’t have. There is also a big, black, evil-looking ghost blending in with the clouds in the background that is staring down on the immigrants.


“Where The Blame Lies”, Sahar Nawabzada Dec 2012

“Where The Blame Lies”, Sahar Nawabzada

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

Published in Judge Magazine on April 4th 1891, the cartoon Where the Blame Lies shows a flood of immigrants arriving to New York City while a disapproving Uncle Sam looks on at them. The cartoon shows a Supreme Court Judge that is imploring Uncle Sam to amend the constitution to restrict immigration. When looking at the immigrants themselves, each immigrant has words such as “Anarchist” or “Socialist” written on their clothing to convey the negative attributes immigrants bring to the country. On the stage is a piece of paper that reads “Mafia in New Orleans, Anarchists in Chicago, and Socialists ...


“It’S Going To Be Just Turned Around”, Zachary Meyer Dec 2012

“It’S Going To Be Just Turned Around”, Zachary Meyer

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

Appearing in the Columbus Dispatch on April 21st 1924, Ray Evans’ cartoon titled “It’s Going to Be Just Turned Around” supports the Immigration Act of 1924 by displaying two different worlds in which different immigration policies are being applied: One with the immigration act, and one without.


“Be Just—Even To John Chinaman”, Prinz Esteban Dec 2012

“Be Just—Even To John Chinaman”, Prinz Esteban

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

Published in Judge Magazine on June 3, 1893 the “Be Just—Even to John Chinaman” cartoon is used to represent the harsh treatment felt by many Chinese immigrants as they entered into the United States with the Chinese Exclusion Act, which was renewed by the Geary Act in 1892. The cartoon displays a Chinese man as he is being forced out of “Miss Columbia's school.” The cartoon itself is full of irony as the other students in the class were also heavily discriminated against in American history.


“They Are Pretty Safe There”, Madison Palmer Dec 2012

“They Are Pretty Safe There”, Madison Palmer

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

The year of 1882 was a intense year for Chinese migrants. This was the year that the Chinese Exclusion act was passed thus banning Chinese immigration to the United States. This hatred for the Chinese began around the time of the building of the transcontinental railroad. This was because so many Chinese were moving to the states to help with the railroad that white males began to feel “insecure” or “frightened” that the Chinese would take all the American jobs and women.


“Uncle Sam’S Thanksgiving Dinner”, Kenosha Gee Dec 2012

“Uncle Sam’S Thanksgiving Dinner”, Kenosha Gee

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

Published in the November 22nd, 1860 issue of Harper Weekly, by Thomas Nast (known for the invention of the character Uncle Sam) Nast captured and celebrated the ethnic diversity and envision the political equality of citizens of the American republic. Even though it seems as if the picture shows that everyone race (African, Native, French, German, Arab, British, Chinese, Italian, etc.) are getting along, there are many hidden messages that lies in this photo. Nast aims the cartoon at the ratification of the 15th amendment to the U.S. Constitution. On the table is a monument to “self- government” and ...


“The Immigrant: Is He An Acquisition Or A Detriment?”, Karla Garcia-Cardenas Dec 2012

“The Immigrant: Is He An Acquisition Or A Detriment?”, Karla Garcia-Cardenas

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

Published in Judge magazine on September 19, 1903, “The Immigrant: Is He An Acquisition Or A Detriment?” cartoon reveals the opposing viewpoints of seven major interest groups towards immigration. Individuals surround the immigrants located in the center, expressing their judgments through signs and identification labels. In general, the cartoon depicts the benefits and drawbacks of immigration in the early twentieth century.


“The Mortar Of Assimilation—And The One Element That Won’T Mix”, Jenna Downs Dec 2012

“The Mortar Of Assimilation—And The One Element That Won’T Mix”, Jenna Downs

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

Published in Puck magazine on June 26, 1889, “The Mortar of Assimilation And The One Element That Just Won’t Mix” cartoon was a perfect exhibit of the Americans view on the Irish immigration to the United States. In the melting pot several different kinds of Americans can be spotted, but the one Irishman is standing on the edge of the pot holding a knife and a flag.


“Another Triumph For Jonathon—Biggest Reptile In The Universe”, Frances Skeirik Dec 2012

“Another Triumph For Jonathon—Biggest Reptile In The Universe”, Frances Skeirik

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

“Another Triumph for Jonathan- Biggest Reptile in the Universe” was published in Judy Newspaper on May 17th, 1882. In this cartoon, Uncle Sam sits back complacently in his rocking chair while this huge sea monster from the United States swims ashore of another country. On the beast is written “American Feniansim”. Looking even closer in the hand of this sea monster is a knife with the word “Assassination” written upon it. Lastly, ashore of the other country is a man holding a lasso in hopes of catching this monster but he is having no luck whatsoever due to the size ...


“Looking Backward”, Flor De Liz Regalado Dec 2012

“Looking Backward”, Flor De Liz Regalado

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

“Looking Backwards”, the controversial cartoon from Puck Magazine, was published on January 11, 1893. Composed by the founder of Puck Magazine himself, Joseph Keppler, created the cartoon that portrays the arguable rights of foreign visitors, also referred to as immigrants. The image represents an immigrant who has stepped off of a ship and entered into a foreign land and greeted with a generous “goodbye”, by those whom once were in his position and are now successful. Behind the figures that rejected the newcomer, are shadows of themselves being casted as they were once immigrants, too.


“The Fool Pied Piper”, Elizabeth Stevenson Dec 2012

“The Fool Pied Piper”, Elizabeth Stevenson

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

This cartoon entitled “The Fool Pied Piper,” that was published in Puck Magazine June 2, 1909 shows American distaste for immigration to the United States. It portrays Uncle Sam as the Pied Piper, leading rats across the ocean toward the Statue of Liberty with a pipe that is labeled “Lax Immigration Laws.” The rats are labeled “Murderer,” “Thief”, “Kidnapper,” and “Assassin.” Some rats are carrying papers that say “The Black Hand.” Meanwhile, leaders and citizens of the countries the rats are leaving are cheering the rats’ departure.


“The Balance Of Trade With Great Britain Seems To Be Still Against Us”, Eric Corral Dec 2012

“The Balance Of Trade With Great Britain Seems To Be Still Against Us”, Eric Corral

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

Published in New York’s Harper’s Weekly on April 28, 1883, “The Balance of Trade with Great Britain Seems to be Still Against Us” depicts the rising tensions between immigrants, particularly Irish, coming to the United States from Great Britain. During the Great Famine (1845-1852) many Irishmen under the rule of the Crown emigrated to the United States. Tensions began to flare between both parties once the Irish nationalist group, “The Fenians,” situated in the United States, began to terrorize Great Britain. The United States felt its Irish immigrants were implicated, and Great Britain felt that the United States ...