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Full-Text Articles in History

Susan Bauer's 2003 Theory Of Well-Educated Mind: Could The Classical Approach To Teaching History Work In Southern California History K12 Classrooms?, Tomasz B. Stanek Nov 2013

Susan Bauer's 2003 Theory Of Well-Educated Mind: Could The Classical Approach To Teaching History Work In Southern California History K12 Classrooms?, Tomasz B. Stanek

LUX: A Journal of Transdisciplinary Writing and Research from Claremont Graduate University

The main purpose of this research evolved from the publication of S. W. Bauer Well-educated mind, a study of the significance of new methods of teaching history course. Bauer (2003) argues that the grammarian approach of simple recognition and memorization removes students from reading primary sources. This theory suggests a new methodology for the instructors and students through the three-stage process of grammar, dialectic, and rhetoric preparation with aid of primary sources or “great books list”. This paper supports Bauer’s thesis and provides evidence through extensive interviews that indeed this concept of pedagogy is present in Southern California schools.


Is Jefferson A Founding Father Of Democratic Education? A Response To "Jefferson And The Ideology Of Democratic Schooling", Johann Neem Oct 2013

Is Jefferson A Founding Father Of Democratic Education? A Response To "Jefferson And The Ideology Of Democratic Schooling", Johann Neem

Democracy and Education

This response argues that it is reasonable to consider Thomas Jefferson a proponent of democratic education. It suggests that Jefferson's education proposals sought to ensure the wide distribution of knowledge and that Jefferson's legacy remains important to us today.


Approaches To Learning With Media And Media Literacy Education – Trends And Current Situation In Germany, Gerhard Tulodziecki, Silke Grafe Sep 2013

Approaches To Learning With Media And Media Literacy Education – Trends And Current Situation In Germany, Gerhard Tulodziecki, Silke Grafe

Journal of Media Literacy Education

German approaches to media literacy education are concerned with the questions, how the variety of media can be used in a meaningful way for learning and teaching and what educational tasks result from the extensive use of media. Considering these questions there are various conceptual ideas, research and development projects as well as implementations into practice in the field of education and teacher training. The development and the current situation of approaches to media literacy education in Germany are described and discussed in the article. Thereby, the focus is on media literacy education in schools.


In Their Footsteps, In Their Words: Special Section, 1914-1963 Jul 2013

In Their Footsteps, In Their Words: Special Section, 1914-1963

Colby Magazine

Three wars. A devastating economic depression. Construction of an entirely new campus from scratch. And all in 50 years.

The period that began as World War I erupted and ended as the tumult of the 1960s loomed was marked by a series of unprecedented events that could have mortally wounded a modestly funded liberal arts college in central Maine. The Great War emptied the campus. World War II turned Colby into a military training center. The bold decision to move the College to Mayflower Hill was sandwiched by the Depression and the Korean War and marked by the return of ...


Bantu Education, Andrew Phillips Jul 2013

Bantu Education, Andrew Phillips

The Review: A Journal of Undergraduate Student Research

In lieu of an abstract, below is the essay's first paragraph.

South Africa has had to deal with issues of racial differences since colonial times. British settlers came into this foreign country and claimed it as their own. Until recently, these settlers were able to treat the black people of South Africa as a subservient and inferior race as a result of the system of apartheid. Many different strategies were needed to keep this imbalanced system in place. One such strategy was employed through education, or a lack thereof. As long as blacks received a lower quality education than ...


In Their Footsteps, In Their Words: Special Section, 1864-1913 Apr 2013

In Their Footsteps, In Their Words: Special Section, 1864-1913

Colby Magazine

In Their Footsteps and In Their Words: Colby explores the second 50 years, 1864-1913.


Drugs, Devices, And Desires: A Problem-Based Learning Course In The History Of Medicine, Sarah Levitt, Anne Mckeage, P. K. Rangachari Mar 2013

Drugs, Devices, And Desires: A Problem-Based Learning Course In The History Of Medicine, Sarah Levitt, Anne Mckeage, P. K. Rangachari

Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning

Problem-based learning (PBL) is well suited for courses in the history of medicine, where multiple perspectives exist and information has to be gleaned from different sources. A student, an archivist, and a teacher offer three perspectives about a senior level course where students explored the antecedents and consequences of medical technology. Two active learning strategies were used: (a) PBL to explore the historical basis of procedures used to diagnose, prevent and treat a single disease, tuberculosis, and (b) a concurrent inquiry-based component that permitted individual exploration of other medical technologies and demonstration of learning through diverse options (book reviews, conversations ...


On Cultural Polymathy: How Visual Thinking, Culture, And Community Create A Platform For Progress, Whitney Dail Mar 2013

On Cultural Polymathy: How Visual Thinking, Culture, And Community Create A Platform For Progress, Whitney Dail

The STEAM Journal

Within the last decade, the commingling of art and science has reached a critical mass. Science has long infused the arts with curiosity for natural phenomena and human behavior. New models for producing knowledge have given rise to interaction and collaboration across the globe, along with a renewed Renaissance.


History With A Twist: Earl Smith Brings A New Perspective To The Life Of The College, Gerry Boyle Mar 2013

History With A Twist: Earl Smith Brings A New Perspective To The Life Of The College, Gerry Boyle

Colby Magazine

The new book, Mayflower Hill: A History of Colby College, has been released. Author and College Historian Earl Smith combines an insider’s view of Colby with a broad cultural perspective for a lively, informative, and sometimes irreverent read.


In Their Footsteps, In Their Words: Special Section, 1813-1863 Feb 2013

In Their Footsteps, In Their Words: Special Section, 1813-1863

Colby Magazine

In Their Footsteps and In Their Words: Colby explores the first 50 years, from Jeremiah Chaplin to the Civil War.


Teaching The Complex Numbers: What History And Philosophy Of Mathematics Suggest, Emily R. Grosholz Jan 2013

Teaching The Complex Numbers: What History And Philosophy Of Mathematics Suggest, Emily R. Grosholz

Journal of Humanistic Mathematics

The narrative about the nineteenth century favored by many philosophers of mathematics strongly influenced by either logic or algebra, is that geometric intuition led real and complex analysis astray until Cauchy and Kronecker in one sense and Dedekind in another guided mathematicians out of the labyrinth through the arithmetization of analysis. Yet the use of geometry in most cases in nineteenth century mathematics was not misleading and was often key to important developments. Thus the geometrization of complex numbers was essential to their acceptance and to the development of complex analysis; geometry provided the canonical examples that led to the ...


Dr. John C. Reed, Jr.: Pioneering Geologist, Mountaineer, And Author Of Creation Of The Teton Landscape, Carol D. Frost, John C. Reed Jr. Jan 2013

Dr. John C. Reed, Jr.: Pioneering Geologist, Mountaineer, And Author Of Creation Of The Teton Landscape, Carol D. Frost, John C. Reed Jr.

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

Few geologists today possess the mountaineering skills to study rocks exposed in the topographically challenging terrain of the Tetons. Even fewer can claim the accomplishment of making the first geologic map of an entire mountain range. One of these pioneering geologists is John C. Reed, Jr., who joined the U.S. Geological Survey in 1953, and who is now scientist emeritus at the U.S. Geological Survey in Denver (Figure 1). In addition to his field geology expertise, Dr. Reed also has a special talent for communicating complex geologic concepts to the public. The purpose of this project was to ...


Central Place Foraging Characteristics Of Beavers (Castor Canadensis) And Habitat Modeling In Grand Teton National Park, William J. Gribb, Henry Harlow Jan 2013

Central Place Foraging Characteristics Of Beavers (Castor Canadensis) And Habitat Modeling In Grand Teton National Park, William J. Gribb, Henry Harlow

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

A significant role of the National Park Service in the United States is the preservation of pristine landscapes. The natural landscape offers the visitor the opportunity to enjoy the wonders of nature and its processes to create beautiful vistas, soaring mountains, and the interplay of vegetation communities. The visitor to the park can be a passive recreationist and observe the landscape or be an active recreationist and experience the landscape through hiking, biking, mountain climbing and a range of other activities. The key linkage between the active and passive recreationist is the landscape that they are experiencing, in one perspective ...


How Conifer Diversity And Availability Influence The Abundance And Biology Of The Red Crossbill, Thomas P. Hahn, Elizabeth M. Schultz Jan 2013

How Conifer Diversity And Availability Influence The Abundance And Biology Of The Red Crossbill, Thomas P. Hahn, Elizabeth M. Schultz

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

In order to understand the distributions and abundances of animals, many environmental factors must be considered, particularly the availability of food resources. Food resources are especially important to nomadic species that move in response to the spatial and temporal availability of these specific food resources that are critical to their survival. An example of such nomadic species is the red crossbill (Loxia curvirostra), which specializes on conifer seeds, a resource that significantly varies both temporally and geographically. Thus, crossbills will move large distances each year to find areas with abundant conifer seeds. While conifer seeds impact the distribution, abundance, and ...


Identifying Avian Community Response To Sagebrush Vegetation Restoration In Grand Teton National Park, Tracey N. Johnson, Anna D. Chalfoun Jan 2013

Identifying Avian Community Response To Sagebrush Vegetation Restoration In Grand Teton National Park, Tracey N. Johnson, Anna D. Chalfoun

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

Approximately 50-60% of native sagebrush steppe has been lost to non-native grasses, which has contributed to population decreases for sagebrush-associated songbirds. Removal of non-native grasses and restoration treatments may return structure and function of sagebrush steppe and ultimately benefit songbirds, but their responses must be evaluated. To determine breeding songbird community responses to sagebrush restoration treatments, in 2013 we conducted bird surveys at restored plots at the Kelly Hayfields restoration area in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. We compared bird communities and vegetation characteristics in restored plots to plots that were unrestored and to areas of native sagebrush steppe as ...


Preliminary Study Of The Influence Of Conductivity And Calcium Concentrations On The Density And Species Richness Of Native And Invasive Gastropods In Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Michele Larson, Gary Beauvais Jan 2013

Preliminary Study Of The Influence Of Conductivity And Calcium Concentrations On The Density And Species Richness Of Native And Invasive Gastropods In Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Michele Larson, Gary Beauvais

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

Freshwater gastropods are a diverse taxa that inhabit a wide variety of freshwater habitats (Lydeard et al. 2004, Strong et al. 2008). Freshwater gastropods often form narrow endemic ranges (Strong et al. 2008) with many species restricted to a single drainage or an isolated spring (Brown et al. 2008). In North America, over 60% of freshwater snails are listed as imperiled or presumed extinct (Lysne et al. 2008). The main factors for the reduction in snail biodiversity are habitat loss, water pollution, and the introduction of invasive species (Strong et al. 2008). Invasive species can dramatically alter the native community ...


The Role Of Dendrochronology In Understanding The Modern Decline Of Whitebark Pine In Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Kendra K. Mclaughlan, Kyleen E. Kelly Jan 2013

The Role Of Dendrochronology In Understanding The Modern Decline Of Whitebark Pine In Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Kendra K. Mclaughlan, Kyleen E. Kelly

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is the only pine keystone species found in North America. Although it is considered a keystone species in high elevation ecosystems in the northern Rockies, it occupies a relatively restricted range and its future is uncertain. In modern times, it has experienced a significant decline in population due to pine beetle infestations, blister rust infections, fire suppression, and climate change. Despite the knowledge that the species is severely threatened, little is known about its paleoecology. More specifically, much remains unknown about how the distribution and stability of whitebark pine were affected by past climate change. The ...


Jackson Hole Wildlife Park: An Experiment To Bridge Tourism And Conservation, Diane M. Sanders Jan 2013

Jackson Hole Wildlife Park: An Experiment To Bridge Tourism And Conservation, Diane M. Sanders

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

From a vantage point on a rise above the Snake River, the valley below is shrouded in darkness. A faint glow on the eastern horizon heralds the dawn. The only sound comes from the river as water gurgles over rocks and other impediments. As the sky grows brighter, the shadows in the valley begin to take form, revealing numerous small streams that braid through dense thickets of willows and other shrubbery before returning to the main river channel. Small dark shapes dart among the trees and shrubs, filling the air with a variety of birdsongs. As the rising sun gradually ...


Mass-Movement Disturbance Regime Landscapes, Hazards, And Water Implications: Grand Teton National Park, John F. Shroder Jr., Brandon J. Weihs Jan 2013

Mass-Movement Disturbance Regime Landscapes, Hazards, And Water Implications: Grand Teton National Park, John F. Shroder Jr., Brandon J. Weihs

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

The Teton Range is the result of active crustal extension (normal faulting) and is the youngest range in the Rocky Mountains at approximately 2 million years old. This makes it a particularly attractive landscape to study, especially in terms of landform development and morphology because of its youth, state of seismic activity, and its recent deglaciation. These factors have combined to produce a unique fluvial landscape in that the fault-shattered metamorphic/igneous rocks of the range have been/are being eroded from their source cliffs at high rates which has covered the glacially scoured valley floors with colluvium such as ...


Describing The Mountainsnails (Oreohelix Sp.) Of Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Lusha Tronstad, Gary Beauvais, Jeanne Serb, Kevin Roe Jan 2013

Describing The Mountainsnails (Oreohelix Sp.) Of Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Lusha Tronstad, Gary Beauvais, Jeanne Serb, Kevin Roe

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

Invertebrates are receiving an increasing amount of conservation attention across North America. Currently, about 40% of the animals listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA) are invertebrates (www.NatureServe.org). The National Park Service and other agencies require better information on invertebrate faunas in order to effectively conserve this important group of animals. One way to prioritize invertebrate groups for study is to assess the number of rare taxa within a given genus. In this context, Oreohelix (mountainsnails) are a top priority because the genus is assumed to support a very high percentage of rare and endemic taxa ...


Paths Of Recovery: Landscape Variability In Forest Structure And Function 25 Years After The 1988 Yellowstone Fires, Monica G. Turner, Winslow D. Hansen, Timothy G. Whitby, William H. Romme, Daniel B. Tinker Jan 2013

Paths Of Recovery: Landscape Variability In Forest Structure And Function 25 Years After The 1988 Yellowstone Fires, Monica G. Turner, Winslow D. Hansen, Timothy G. Whitby, William H. Romme, Daniel B. Tinker

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

Understanding succession following severe wildfire is increasingly important for forest managers in western North America and critical for anticipating the resilience of forested landscapes to changing environmental conditions. Successional trajectories set the stage for future carbon storage, abundance and distribution of fuels, and habitat for many species. Early successional forests are increasing throughout the West in response to greater fire activity, but few long-term studies have considered succession following stand-replacing wildfires over large areas. The size and heterogeneity of the 1988 Yellowstone fires created novel opportunities to study succession at an unprecedented scale following severe fire, and we have studied ...


Old Faithful Visitor’S Center Exhibit Observation Study, Pat Stephens Williams, Ray Darville, Sarah Fuller Jan 2013

Old Faithful Visitor’S Center Exhibit Observation Study, Pat Stephens Williams, Ray Darville, Sarah Fuller

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

This report was a result of volunteer research orchestrated by Katy Duffy, Interpretive Planner, Yellowstone National Park. The data collection was a direct need for grant compliance for the National Science Foundation associated with exhibits for the new Old Faithful Visitor Education Center, which opened to the public in August, 2006. The objective of this research was to understand visitor interaction with these exhibits using an unobtrusive form of data collection.


Exploring The Physiological Mechanisms And Ecological Consequences Of Energetic Tradeoffs: An Integative Study Of The Influences Of Avian Malarial Infection On Thermogenic Performance, Mathew Carling Jan 2013

Exploring The Physiological Mechanisms And Ecological Consequences Of Energetic Tradeoffs: An Integative Study Of The Influences Of Avian Malarial Infection On Thermogenic Performance, Mathew Carling

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

Survival in variable environments often requires careful allocation of resources to competing physiological and behavioral functions. Because these competing processes often have additive energetic costs (Hawley et al. 2012), a limited resource pool forces individuals to make difficult trade-off decisions regarding energetic investments (Lochmiller and Deerenberg 2000). These trade-offs are a cornerstone of life-history theory that is aimed at determining the optimal allocation strategies in variable environments (Ricklefs and Wikelski 2002), and understanding their physiological and ecological consequences has renewed poignancy in the face of the unprecedented rate of anthropogenic environmental change occurring across the planet.


Developing Non-Destructive Methods To Determine Natal Origins Of Snake River Cutthroat Trout In The Jackson Lake Watershed, Scott A. Carleton Jan 2013

Developing Non-Destructive Methods To Determine Natal Origins Of Snake River Cutthroat Trout In The Jackson Lake Watershed, Scott A. Carleton

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

Across their native ranges, cutthroat trout populations are imperiled due to habitat loss, habitat alteration, and introduction of non-native species (Liknes and Graham 1988, Behnke 1992, Hitt et al. 2003). These changes have not gone undetected and a great deal of time and money have been invested in conservation and restoration of cutthroat trout populations (Kershner 1995, USDA 1996, Young and Harig 2002, Baker et al. 2008). The success of these projects is tightly linked to the ability of resource managers to prioritize management efforts. Specifically, where should the investments of time and money br focused to yield the greatest ...


Alpine Moist Meadow Response To Nitrogen Deposition In The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, Amber C. Churchill, William D. Bowman Jan 2013

Alpine Moist Meadow Response To Nitrogen Deposition In The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, Amber C. Churchill, William D. Bowman

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

The deposition of anthropogenic reactive nitrogen (N) in alpine ecosystems can have multiple deleterious effects on plants, soils and hydrology in both the alpine and areas downstream through leaching and export. Thresholds for ecological responses to N deposition have been established for lakes, soils and changes in plant community composition in some areas of the Rocky Mountains. These thresholds offer a target for land and air resource managers to prevent significant changes in ecosystem function, however the underlying feedbacks controlling ecosystem response have not been fully examined. Research originally proposed in association with our UW NPS Small Grant aimed to ...


Using Field Data To Validate Satellite Models Of Elk Forage In The Upper Yellowstone River Basin, Erica Garroutte, Andrew Hansen Jan 2013

Using Field Data To Validate Satellite Models Of Elk Forage In The Upper Yellowstone River Basin, Erica Garroutte, Andrew Hansen

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

Spatial and temporal variations in grassland phenology are thought to play a critical role in migration patterns of large herbivores in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Phenology, referring to the timing of green-up in this study, is directly related to biomass and forage quality. Migratory elk (Cervus elaphus), therefore, are believed to follow phenology across an elevation gradient during the growing season to maximize their access to high quality and quantity of forage. Concern that climate change and human land use alterations of phenology may impact the benefits of elk migration highlights the need for landscape-scale vegetation phenology monitoring. Satellite-derived Normalized ...


Validation Of Fecal-Based Methods For Monitoring Nutrition And Reproduction Of Moose In The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, Jacob R. Goheen, Brett R. Jesmer Jan 2013

Validation Of Fecal-Based Methods For Monitoring Nutrition And Reproduction Of Moose In The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, Jacob R. Goheen, Brett R. Jesmer

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

Understanding the influence of habitat and climate on wildlife nutrition, reproduction and demography is a major goal for natural resource managers and ecologists alike. Although both top-down (i.e., predation and disease) and bottom-up (i.e. habitat and nutrition) forces impact demography, the nutritional condition of an animal is an integration of its environment (Parker et al. 2009) and influences reproduction and survival (Clutton-Brock et al. 1987, Keech et al. 2000, Cook et al. 2004), thus allowing for the identification of limiting factors. Researchers and managers must understand which factors limit population growth before mitigating actions can be taken.


Spatio-Temporal Ecological And Evolutionary Dynamics In Natural Butterfly Populations (2013 Field Season), Zachariah Gompert, Lauren Lucas Jan 2013

Spatio-Temporal Ecological And Evolutionary Dynamics In Natural Butterfly Populations (2013 Field Season), Zachariah Gompert, Lauren Lucas

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

The study of evolution in natural populations has advanced our understanding of the origin and maintenance of biological diversity. For example, long term studies of wild populations indicate that natural selection can cause rapid and dramatic changes in traits, but that in some cases these evolutionary changes are quickly reversed when periodic variation in weather patterns or the biotic environment cause the optimal trait value to change (e.g., Reznick et al. 1997, Grant and Grant 2002). In fact, spatial and temporal variation in the strength and nature of natural selection could explain the high levels of genetic variation found ...


Pictorialism In The American West, Rachel Sailor Jan 2013

Pictorialism In The American West, Rachel Sailor

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

Early twentieth century (1900-1945) photography of northwestern Wyoming (including the Teton and Yellowstone areas) fits into a paradigm of regional photographic production that either conforms to the documentary or pictorial aesthetics most common in the era. Pictorial photography, especially, links the region to larger trends in the nation and can be analyzed to uncover previously unexamined assumptions about the value of photographic aesthetics and regional production within the milieu of fine art photography in the United States prior to WWII.


Identifying Rare Montane Meadow Parnassian Butterfly Populations Across Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Kimberly E. Szcondronski, Diane M. Debinski Jan 2013

Identifying Rare Montane Meadow Parnassian Butterfly Populations Across Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, Kimberly E. Szcondronski, Diane M. Debinski

University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center Annual Report

The pristine, protected ecosystem of Grand Teton National Park (GRTE) is the ideal location to study the relationships between butterfly populations and the habitats on which these insects depend. Two montane meadow butterfly species, Parnassius clodius and Parnassius smintheus, were investigated in this study to identify patterns of habitat occupancy relating to variables across GRTE and into the surrounding territory of Bridger–Teton National Forest (BTNF). Population dynamics of P. clodius have been intensively studied by our research group over several consecutive years in one isolated population in Grand Teton National Park. However, little has been investigated regarding the Parnassian ...