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Articles 1 - 26 of 26

Full-Text Articles in European Languages and Societies

Review Of Emily Hemelrijk, Hidden Lives, Public Personae, Women And Civic Life In The Roman West, Rachel Meyers Jan 2017

Review Of Emily Hemelrijk, Hidden Lives, Public Personae, Women And Civic Life In The Roman West, Rachel Meyers

World Languages and Cultures Publications

This book is the culmination of E. Hemelrijk’s examinations of non-imperial women in the Roman West over fifteen years. She has regularly published articles on all the topics included here, yet she energetically revisits them here and produces fresh analysis of her corpus of approximately 1,400 inscriptions coming from Italian and provincial cities from the late Republic to the late third century.


A New Examination Of The Arch Of Marcus Aurelius And Lucius Verus At Oea, Rachel Meyers Jan 2017

A New Examination Of The Arch Of Marcus Aurelius And Lucius Verus At Oea, Rachel Meyers

World Languages and Cultures Publications

The arch dedicated to Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus at Oea was an important component in that town’s building activity. By situating the arch within its socio-historical context and acknowledging the political identity of Oea and nearby towns, this article shows that the arch at Oea far surpassed nearby contemporary arches in style, material, and execution. Further, this article demonstrates that the arch was a key element in Oea’s Roman identity. Finally, the article bridges disciplinary boundaries by bringing together art historical analysis with the concepts of euergetism, Roman civic status, and inter-city rivalry in the Roman Empire.


Animated Holes: An Interview With Naomi Uman, Justin Remes Jan 2017

Animated Holes: An Interview With Naomi Uman, Justin Remes

English Publications

“Oh, Walter! Tell me what you see.” – A sexually-charged woman, Naomi Uman’s removed (1999)

I’m watching a German porno from the 1970s. Well, not quite. I’m watching a German porno that’s been dubbed into English, which explains why the characters’ mouths are not synchronized with their salacious dialogue (“My God, she’s got a fantastic ass!”). The film is a German porno, once removed.


Pre-Colonial Foodways, Christina Gish Hill Jan 2016

Pre-Colonial Foodways, Christina Gish Hill

World Languages and Cultures Publications

By the time Europeans reached the shores of the Americas, the Indigenous peoples of the northern continent had developed food systems that efficiently utilized their abundant landscape to provide a relatively nutritious diet. The diversity of Indigenous food ways mirrored the diversity of the ecosystems of each people’s homeland. Lush forests east of the Mississippi harbored plentiful game and provided fertile soil for fields of corn, beans, and squash. Peoples who lived along the ocean coasts gathered tidewater resources, like shellfish, seaweed, and sea urchins. They also perfected seafaring vessels that could take them far from land, even to ...


French Language And Cultures For The Professions: A Case Study For The Twenty-First Century, Stacey Weber-Fève Mar 2014

French Language And Cultures For The Professions: A Case Study For The Twenty-First Century, Stacey Weber-Fève

World Languages and Cultures Publications

Taking up the May 2013 special issue theme concerning the future of French Programs in the United States, their “orientation” and “survival,” the author sets out to maintain a positive tone and productive perspective on this polemic via a working case study of her home institution’s “French Language and Cultures for Professions” program. The author first reviews existing scholarship concerning the teaching and learning of “Business French” and then presents a course “blueprint” for a twenty-first century update to this traditional curricular and programmatic model, re-titled “French for Business and Professions.”


Faust's Begehren: Revisiting The History Of Political Economy In Faust Ii, William H. Carter Jan 2014

Faust's Begehren: Revisiting The History Of Political Economy In Faust Ii, William H. Carter

World Languages and Cultures Publications

Since The Publication of Faust II, commentators interested in economic aspects of the text have focused primarily on three of its five acts. Bernd Mahl, whose work on Goethe’s economic knowledge remains a standard reference, writes that the topics most frequently addressed following its publication are the creation of paper money in act 1, Faust’s renewed activity in act 4, and the commercial ventures of Faust and Mephistopheles in act 5.1 More recent investigations have generally continued this trend.2 Given this lengthy history of interpretation, what is one to make of the second and third acts ...


Review Of Faust. Zweyter Theil - Paralipomena: Studienausgabe, William H. Carter Jan 2014

Review Of Faust. Zweyter Theil - Paralipomena: Studienausgabe, William H. Carter

World Languages and Cultures Publications

In 2011, Reclam published a two-volume Studienausgabe of Faust I and II (based on the Ausgabe letzter Hand), edited and with commentary by Ulrich Gaier. The following year, Edition Isele published Gaier’s Lesarten von Goethes “Faust.” These three volumes were originally published in 1999 as part of a box set titled Faust-Dichtungen (Reclam). The Studienausgabe and Lesarten von Goethes “Faust,” as Gaier explains in the preface to the latter, are revised and expanded versions of the second and third volumes of his Faust-Dichtungen (9). The publication history of these texts does not take away from their contribution to Faust ...


The Distance Is More Than An Ocean, Chris Wiewiora Jan 2014

The Distance Is More Than An Ocean, Chris Wiewiora

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The first part of The Distance Is More Than An Ocean takes readers on a coming&ndashof&ndashage journey to Poland. I recall my childhood attending the American School and struggling with language as an American&ndashPole. On a visit to my family&rsquos house in Warsaw, my adult perspective confronts my childhood memory as I consider the historical rebuilding of Old Town after its destruction during World War II. With my father, I visit Auschwitz and then recount my grandmother&rsquos story of surviving the camps. While in Krakow, we visit my mother&rsquos friend who taught her Polish ...


Writing To Be Heard: Performing Music In Don Quixote, Chad M. Gasta Jan 2013

Writing To Be Heard: Performing Music In Don Quixote, Chad M. Gasta

World Languages and Cultures Publications

Cervantes must have felt that the ongoing transformation to a culture dominated by the written verse had significant drawbacks, at least when it came to music and poetry. As a result, in Don Quixote the author expects the reader to find the textual cues to suitably perform the novel’s lyrical poetry, in much the same way as the troubadours of his youth would have. We will never know if his contemporaneous readers picked up on these clues. But, they are there nonetheless, indicating that Cervantes had an astonishing knowledge of early modern musical forms, while also reminding us that ...


Intersexes And Mixed Races: Visuality, Narrative, And ‘Bastard’ Identity In Early Twentieth-Century Germany, Kevin S. Amidon Jan 2013

Intersexes And Mixed Races: Visuality, Narrative, And ‘Bastard’ Identity In Early Twentieth-Century Germany, Kevin S. Amidon

World Languages and Cultures Publications

1he founding of the German Empire in 1871, and the resulting constellation of intra-European and colonial conflicts, generated a wide range of new concerns about rhe characteristics and determinants of "Germanness." Scholars, politicians, medical authorities, legal professionals, and artists explored and debated standards of inclusion and exclusion as they propagated both intellectual and institutional ways to develop and mainrain standards for what qualified as German. \VolfLepenies argues char rhe result was a tenuous relationship between the newly scare-defined German political sphere and the other fluid means of establishing rhe Germanness of those who inhabited rhe new state. "At rimes, it ...


Essex’S International Agenda In 1595 And His Device Of The Indian Prince, Linda Shenk Jan 2013

Essex’S International Agenda In 1595 And His Device Of The Indian Prince, Linda Shenk

English Publications

In the fall of 1595, Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, was poised to attain political greatness, and he knew it. The international political climate had become sufficiently precarious that a statesman with Essex‘s particular expertise in foreign intelligence and military matters possessed skills well-tailored to address England’s current crises. Spain was once again preparing to invade, this time with an armada greater than in 1588; relations with England’s key ally France were cooling; and the financial and military advantages of asserting a presence in the New World were becoming increasingly evident. Aware of this moment as opportune ...


Review Of Goethes Politisches Denken Und Handeln Im Spiegel Seiner Amtlichen Schriften: Eine Politikwissenschaftliche Analyse, William H. Carter Jan 2011

Review Of Goethes Politisches Denken Und Handeln Im Spiegel Seiner Amtlichen Schriften: Eine Politikwissenschaftliche Analyse, William H. Carter

World Languages and Cultures Publications

Goethe’s Amtliche Schriften document in great detail the many responsibilities he undertook during his public service in Weimar, which began in 1776 and continued for decades following his return from Italy. Whether one is familiar with this side of Goethe or desires to learn more about it, Wolfgang Pollert provides a welcome contribution to this area of Goethe studies, one which still remains largely unexplored. As the title suggests, Pollert’s study is not a literary analysis. While there are a few brief references to Faust, West-östlicher Divan, and the Wilhelm Meister novels, the author concentrates primarily on Goethe ...


Review Of Goethe's Modernisms, William H. Carter Jan 2010

Review Of Goethe's Modernisms, William H. Carter

World Languages and Cultures Publications

Imagine for a moment that you are not a Goethe scholar, and consider these questions: Why read Goethe, or his contemporaries, for that matter? Is it worth the time and effort required? Are there not more relevant issues deserving of our attention? It is the year 2011 after all. What might we learn from this fellow Goethe that we don’t already know? With the ever-increasing pressure on educators in the liberal arts, in general, and Germanists, more specifically, to make a case for their continued existence, these are deadly serious questions. They require answers that are accessible to an ...


Review Of Geld Und Magie: Eine Okonomische Deutung Von Goethes Faust, William H. Carter Jan 2009

Review Of Geld Und Magie: Eine Okonomische Deutung Von Goethes Faust, William H. Carter

World Languages and Cultures Publications

The first thing that must be said about this book is that, despite the claim that it is a “vollständig überarbeitete Ausgabe,” this is simply not the case. Although the subtitle may have changed (originally “Deutung und Kritik der modernen Wirtschaft anhand von Goethes Faust”), the story it tells twenty years later remains in effect the same. I shall return to the significance of this for those of us interested in Goethe Age economics, but first I will address Binswanger’s argument, the additions made to the second edition, and the value of this type of economic commentary on Goethe ...


Adolf Meyer-Abich, Holism, And The Negotiation Of Theoretical Biology, Kevin S. Amidon Jan 2009

Adolf Meyer-Abich, Holism, And The Negotiation Of Theoretical Biology, Kevin S. Amidon

World Languages and Cultures Publications

Adolf Meyer-Abich (1893–1971; known as Adolf Meyer before 1938) spent his career as one of the most vigorous and varied advocates in the biological sciences. Primarily a philosophical proponent of holistic thought in biology, he also sought through collaboration with empirically oriented colleagues in biology, medicine, and even physics (including C. J. van der Klaauw, Karl K¨otschau, Hans B¨oker, Jakob von Uexk¨ull, and Pascual Jordan) to develop arguments against mechanistic and reductionistic positions in the life sciences, and to integrate them into a newly disciplinary theoretical biology. He participated in major publishing efforts including the founding ...


What Happens To Countess Geschwitz? Revisiting Homosexuality In Horkheimer And Adorno, Kevin S. Amidon Jan 2008

What Happens To Countess Geschwitz? Revisiting Homosexuality In Horkheimer And Adorno, Kevin S. Amidon

World Languages and Cultures Publications

In the philosophical and culture-critical works of Theodor Adorno and Max Hork- heimer, the concept of homosexuality exists almost always in close textual relation to fascist domination. This is because they cannot see homosexual persons as exist- ing outside the dominating discourses of the nineteenth-century bourgeois legal and psychiatric explication of homosexuality. This issue throws the stakes of ethical reflection in Critical Theory into high relief, especially since feminist thinkers including Judith Butler have recently provided a highly positive rereading of Adorno’s ethics. A close reading of Adorno’s exploration of Alban Berg’s opera Lulu further demonstrates the ...


"To Love And Be Wise": The Earl Of Essex, Humanist Court Culture, And England's Learned Queen, Linda Shenk Jan 2007

"To Love And Be Wise": The Earl Of Essex, Humanist Court Culture, And England's Learned Queen, Linda Shenk

English Publications

During two particular decades of her reign—the 1560s and the 1590s—Queen Elizabeth I strategically and publicly represented herself as a learned prince. In the 1590s alone, she staged several significant demonstrations of her erudition: she delivered a Latin oration at the University of Oxford (1592) while university officials, prominent nobles, and international dignitaries looked on; in the months after Henri IV converted to Catholicism in 1593, she translated Boethius; in 1597, she trounced the Spanish-allied Polish ambassador with a pert Latin speech; and in 1598, she translated excerpts from Horace Ars poetica and Plutarch's essay De curiositate ...


Mildred Cooke Cecil, Linda Shenk Jan 2007

Mildred Cooke Cecil, Linda Shenk

English Publications

Married to William Cecil, Queen Elizabeth's chief advisor, Mildred Cooke Cecil occupied a rare position in Elizabethan England. She traveled in the inmost circles of high politics and occasionally participated directly in political, typically international, situations. Born on 25 August 1526 to Sir Anthony Cooke and Lady Anne Fitzwilliam, Cooke Cecil became one of the most famous learned women in England during and even after her lifetime. Elizabethan educator Roger Ascham lauded Cooke Cecil for being able to read Greek as easily as English. She had proven this skill by translating Greek works by the early church fathers, St ...


Anne Cooke Bacon, Linda Shenk Jan 2007

Anne Cooke Bacon, Linda Shenk

English Publications

Motivated by religious piety and a remarkable education, Anne Cooke Bacon was one of the most prominent and prolific women writers in Renaissance England. Scholars have called attention in particular to the transformation her writing underwent after the death of her husband, Sir Nicholas Bacon, in 1579. While he lived, Cooke Bacon translated religious works, modestly keeping the focus on the ideas of others. When she became a widow, she assumed a new voice and tone-assertive and often domineering-in letters of advice not only to her adult sons but to prominent male political figures as well.


Review Of Framing Faust: Twentieth-Century Cultural Struggles, William H. Carter Jan 2006

Review Of Framing Faust: Twentieth-Century Cultural Struggles, William H. Carter

World Languages and Cultures Publications

The scope of Fratning Faust: Twentieth-Century Cultural Struggles is very ambitious, as Inez Hedges concedes at the outset. Rather than attempting to survey "the entire landscape of the Faustian," she narrows her focus to "the ways in which the Faustian rebel has surfaced in some of the most important cultural crises of the twentieth century" in order "to explore the Faustian myth in its various political, aesthetic, and social contexts" (xiii). While the topic appears very broad at first, the author skillfully demonstrates her expertise in European film and surrealism as she excavates little-known archival material and countless lesser-known Faust ...


'Ab Les Man Junctes E Genolls En Terra': Intercession And The Notion Of Queenship In Late Medieval Catalonia, Dawn Bratsch-Prince Jan 2006

'Ab Les Man Junctes E Genolls En Terra': Intercession And The Notion Of Queenship In Late Medieval Catalonia, Dawn Bratsch-Prince

World Languages and Cultures Publications

Did medieval women who wore the crown share a common notion of queenship or recognize their own membership in a privileged group? Throughout medieval Europe the most salient images of queenship were those of wife, mother, and intercessor, familiar to the general population through Biblical and literary sources. This essay suggests that medieval Mediterranean queens were, in fact, aware of the power and influence that their role as intercessor afforded them. Two texts composed by the Aragonese queen Violant de Bar are used to shed light on a notion of queenship seemingly understood by her contemporaries, both male and female ...


Turning Learned Authority Into Royal Supremacy: Elizabeth I'S Learned Persona And Her University Orations, Linda Shenk Jan 2003

Turning Learned Authority Into Royal Supremacy: Elizabeth I'S Learned Persona And Her University Orations, Linda Shenk

Linda Shenk

When the princess Elizabeth studied languages and rhetoric with William Grindal and Roger Ascham, she acquired more than practical skills. She earned the right to depict herself as a learned prince. Throughout the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, the image of the educated monarch had gained particular political currency when humanist thinkers marketed the schoolroom as the necessary training ground for both king and counselor. Learned status served as proof that one was sufficiently wise and virtuous to hold political office.


A Queen’S Task: Violant De Bar And The Experience Of Royal Motherhood In Fourteenth-Century Aragón, Dawn Bratsch-Prince Jan 1998

A Queen’S Task: Violant De Bar And The Experience Of Royal Motherhood In Fourteenth-Century Aragón, Dawn Bratsch-Prince

World Languages and Cultures Publications

In a letter to Pere III dated 11 March 1381, the fifteen-year-old duchess of Gerona, Violant de Bar, joyously announces her first pregnancy: "notifich a Ia vostra senyoria per tal com se que n'haurets plaer que'm s6 feta prenys, e'm trob be ab lo prenyat, grades ne vajen a Deu" (ACA, reg. 1821, fol. 68<). 1 So begins her procreative trial as wife of the king's first-born son,Joan, heir to the powerful Crown of Aragon. Fifteen years later, we find King Joan dead without a legitimate male heir and the process of his brother Marti's succession in great confusion because, according to historian E.L. Miron,


Jane Howell And Subverting Shakespeare: Where Do We Draw The Lines?, Linda Shenk Jan 1995

Jane Howell And Subverting Shakespeare: Where Do We Draw The Lines?, Linda Shenk

Linda Shenk

When Ralph Berry asks RSC director Bill Alexander to explain how a director chooses to do a Shakespearean play in a certain manner, Alexander replies: "For me, it all boils down to this: how best can I reveal this play, how best can I release my own perception of the play, my own feeling of what it's about, and what it says and why he wrote it" (Berry 178). To fulfill these goals, directors often choose to set a play in a different historical context, devise a thematic doubling scheme, and/or cut lines to emphasize a specific concept ...


A Reappraisal Of The Correpondence Of Violant De Bar, Dawn Bratsch-Prince Jan 1994

A Reappraisal Of The Correpondence Of Violant De Bar, Dawn Bratsch-Prince

World Languages and Cultures Publications

Notarial documents are an indispensible resource for the history of culture, politics, and literature, because they are free from much of the social and cultural prejudices that color many literary texts. As the Spanish literary critic, Maria Eugenia Lacarra, rightly states in a recent article on feminist approaches to medieval Spanish history and literature «It is unfortunate that notarial documents, which are the least ideologically contaminated sources and therefore the most reliable, have been least studied [by literary historians]» (r988, r4). Precisely because this type of source material helps the critic see past culturally propagated misrepresentations of reality, Lacarra advocates ...


Textual History Of Li Livres Dou Tresor: Fitting The Pieces Together, Dawn Bratsch-Prince Jan 1993

Textual History Of Li Livres Dou Tresor: Fitting The Pieces Together, Dawn Bratsch-Prince

World Languages and Cultures Publications

Modern editors of medieval texts all face the singular difficulty of determining which version of a text they will edit. Will they adhere to one manuscript? Will they attempt to recreate the author's original? Will they eliminate or include interpolations and glosses? In the Middle Ages, the concepts of literary originality and authorship were not exalted as they are today. In fact, as succinctly stated by Cerquiglini (1989, 25), "L'auteur n'est pas une idee medievale." Rather, literary compositions were fluid artifacts which were commonly modified with every copying or recitation, although they were frequently attributed to one ...