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Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Art and Design

Choosing Glass: Color And Impressions, Robert N. Oddy Oct 2011

Choosing Glass: Color And Impressions, Robert N. Oddy

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

In the last issue of Glass Craftsman, I said that, for me, the choice of glass is probably the most important factor contributing to artistry in stained glass. Tiffany’s company made glass for specific purposes, and raised the medium to a new level of expressive power. Now, we have a huge selection of stained glass available for our creative purposes. We just have to make the effort to familiarize ourselves to what is out there.


The Illusion Of Depth In Stained Glass: Techniques, Robert N. Oddy Oct 2011

The Illusion Of Depth In Stained Glass: Techniques, Robert N. Oddy

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Spontaneity In Stained Glass Work, Robert N. Oddy Jul 2011

Spontaneity In Stained Glass Work, Robert N. Oddy

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

Stained glass does not lend itself to spontaneity. We design, thinking always about how the glass will be cut and what glass will be available to us. Then, the fabrication is a very slow and meticulous process, requiring accuracy of cutting so that the pieces fit together closely – glass doesn’t bend, stretch or squash. We have to do too much careful planning, and too much engineering! How can we make our subjects come alive, with movement and energy, when we cannot use our bodies to express these things while we are doing the art?


The Illusion Of Depth In Stained Glass: Exposed To The Light, Robert N. Oddy Jul 2011

The Illusion Of Depth In Stained Glass: Exposed To The Light, Robert N. Oddy

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

Stained glass artwork often looks flat. Of course, most stained glass panels are flat. What I mean is that the objects depicted look flat. In my own work, I have given a lot of attention to creating the illusion of depth. What is depth? It refers to the spacial dimension that recedes directly away from our eyes into the distance. If a picture has depth, we see some of its elements as solid objects; some appear closer than others; we are aware of foreground, middle distance and background.


Creative Consciousness: Becoming A Reflective Designer, Renessa Ciampa Brewer May 2011

Creative Consciousness: Becoming A Reflective Designer, Renessa Ciampa Brewer

Critical and Creative Thinking Capstones Collection

As a graphic designer, I was drawn to the CCT Program in part because I desired to strengthen my thinking skills as a creative professional. Through being reflective, I aimed to “get more in touch” with my process to better understand it and see how I might improve my approaches. Scholarship on reflective practice in design education and design practice is a growing body of literature, which inspired this synthesis project. This paper looks at Schön’s theories of reflection-in-action and reflection-on-action, models for reflection in the design process provided by Ellmers, Brown, and Bennett, and Reymen, and various reflective ...


Ragland, Mark S. (Fa 559), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives May 2011

Ragland, Mark S. (Fa 559), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

FA Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Folklife Archives Project 559. Paper: "Influence of Popular Culture on the Subject of Art," done by Mark S. Ragland as part of a folk studies class at Western Kentucky University. Includes an interview done by Ragland with artist and art educator Michael Taylor about the influence of popular culture on art, with particular emphasis on the pop art genre.


Measured Chance, Brian R. Kluge Apr 2011

Measured Chance, Brian R. Kluge

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

In my practice I use clay to make enigmatic, non-representational sculptures that employ reductive geometry and archetypal forms. By pressing clay into a variety of molds, it is my intention to contrast a primal crudeness with a skilled precision in my handling of the material. I fabricate objects that range in scale from handheld to human- size. In this work, I combine references to the forms of manmade things with surfaces that allude to age and wear resulting from natural patinas that occur on stone, wood, or metal. This body of work shares qualities with the Minimalist and Earth Art ...


Ua68/5/1 Senior Art Show Catalog, Wku Art Apr 2011

Ua68/5/1 Senior Art Show Catalog, Wku Art

WKU Archives Records

Exhibition catalog showcasing the work of senior art students in a variety of mediums.


Line Relationships: More To Lines Than Meets The Eye, Robert N. Oddy Apr 2011

Line Relationships: More To Lines Than Meets The Eye, Robert N. Oddy

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

Lines in stained glass artwork are important design features. With copper foil and lead came techniques, they are often prominent and black with the light source behind them. Carefully designed and implemented lines can enhance the sense of depth in a picture and have a rather paradoxical nature in our work. I find that I have a rather complicated relationship with my lines.


The Lead Line Effect: Shape Without The Came, Robert N. Oddy Apr 2011

The Lead Line Effect: Shape Without The Came, Robert N. Oddy

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

In a previous article, I have mentioned my view that stained glass work is akin to impressionism. We use the features of the glass to suggest detail in our subject matter. However, I often find that for some details, this approach is not adequate. For an example, see the scales in Koi, figure 1. It is also not always practical to implement this fine detail by joining large numbers of very small pieces of glass. In this article, I will talk about methods that produce effects compatible with the ‘lead’ lines of traditional stained glass, namely the use of copper ...


Plating In Stained Glass: Experience The Beauty, Robert N. Oddy Jan 2011

Plating In Stained Glass: Experience The Beauty, Robert N. Oddy

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

“Plating” is a piece of stained glass jargon. It refers to the practice of using more than one layer of glass in the construction of a panel. The layers are not fused together. They are simply stacked up, one on top of another and joined by soldering foil or came. I would like to spend a little time on the reasons for using this plating technique. In a future article I may say more about the techniques themselves, but the why’s are more important than the how’s.