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12th Biennial Symposium Program, Part 1, Textiles And Settlement: From Plains Space To Cyber Space Jan 2010

12th Biennial Symposium Program, Part 1, Textiles And Settlement: From Plains Space To Cyber Space

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

As President of TSA, I am delighted to welcome you to the 12th Biennial Symposium of the Textile Society of America. This gathering brings together an impressive number of scholars, artists, museum and gallery professionals, educators, and textile enthusiasts from around the world.

As an organization, TSA selects Symposium venues which through their unique site specific offerings broaden our understanding of diverse museum collections and institutions in different geographic settings, encouraging new and old members to discover what yet another location holds of serious interest to specialists. Each gathering has its own flavor and distinct sense of place. For this ...


12th Biennial Symposium Program, Part 2: Concurrent Local Exhibitions At Participating Museums And Galleries Jan 2010

12th Biennial Symposium Program, Part 2: Concurrent Local Exhibitions At Participating Museums And Galleries

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings


Head Coverings In The Virtual Umma: The Case Of Niqab, Heather Marie Akou Jan 2010

Head Coverings In The Virtual Umma: The Case Of Niqab, Heather Marie Akou

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

A growing body of literature points to the Internet as a place where Muslims are re-imagining themselves as part of a global, interconnected, religious culture—a new virtual umma. Along with issues such as politics, Islamic law, the interpretation of text, and procedures for rituals, hijab (modest dress) is a frequent topic of conversation. Compared to the physical world, where debates are heavily framed by time, place, and the habits of daily life, on the World Wide Web ideas and products flow much more easily. A new convert in Canada, for example, could use the Internet to read translated passages ...


Textiles And Tradition In The Marketplace, Philis Alvic Jan 2010

Textiles And Tradition In The Marketplace, Philis Alvic

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Textiles and traditional textile techniques have been part of economic crafts development in many countries for a long time. Many of the schemes for helping the poorest of the world’s poor involve using or adapting textiles and creating products to appeal to the tourist and export markets. Individual styles become marketing tools because they are unique to a particular culture. In coming up with items that will sell, rarely does the product honor the culture that it came from.

While any TSA member would realize the value of traditional textiles, most customers prefer that the fabric be used to ...


Of Gods And Gangs: Indigo As A New Educational Model, Jenny Balfour Paul Jan 2010

Of Gods And Gangs: Indigo As A New Educational Model, Jenny Balfour Paul

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

In late August 2009, a multi-year educational initiative called Silk Road Connect was launched in five pilot schools in underserved neighbourhoods of New York City as part of its Department of Education’s Campaign for Middle School Success. The brainchild of cellist Yo Yo Ma and his Silk Road Project, Silk Road Connect ‘inspires passion-driven learning by empowering students and educators to seek connections across all areas of study and to follow their interests from the familiar to the foreign. In a spirit of playfulness and investigation, collaboration and creativity, this program invites students to experience learning as a continual ...


Choreographed Cartography: Translation, Feminized Labor, And Digital Literacy In Half/Angel’S The Knitting Map, Deborah Barkun, Jools Gilson Jan 2010

Choreographed Cartography: Translation, Feminized Labor, And Digital Literacy In Half/Angel’S The Knitting Map, Deborah Barkun, Jools Gilson

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

The Knitting Map was a large-scale, durational textile installation by the Irish-based performance production company half/angel that took place during Cork’s year as European Capital of Culture (2005). Bringing a decade of experience with emergent technologies and art practice, half/angel developed technologies to connect the physical busy-ness of Cork City (captured via a series of CCTV cameras) with correspondingly complex knitting stitches (stitches became more complex when the city was busy), and Cork weather (captured by a weather station) to yarn color. The resulting textile was an abstract documentation of a year in the life of an ...


Oriental Carpets, Spatial Dimension, And The Development Of Linear Perspective: From Grid To Projective Grid, Carol Bier Jan 2010

Oriental Carpets, Spatial Dimension, And The Development Of Linear Perspective: From Grid To Projective Grid, Carol Bier

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Studies of the origins of linear perspective in European painting tend to focus on developments in treatment of the spatial dimension, with attention especially devoted to mathematical principles that underlie the representation of three-dimensional space. The theoretical understanding of this is first articulated in Alberti’s treatise De pictura (1435). Given that carpets are relatively flat objects, and that their patterning, no matter how complex, was intended to be viewed as two-dimensional, the linking of carpets to the representation of three-dimensional space would seem to be paradoxical. But the relationship may actually find a basis in historical reality.

Carpets produced ...


Progressional Journeys: Compelling New Directions For Three “New Basketry” Artists, J. Penny Burton Jan 2010

Progressional Journeys: Compelling New Directions For Three “New Basketry” Artists, J. Penny Burton

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

The “New Basketry” movement of the late 1960s and the early 1970s was essentially spearheaded by Ed Rossbach. Many leading fiber artists and educators have been touched by this lasting legacy in some manner, whether from their own experiences as students of Rossbach’s, or merely from studying the fine technical and innovative basketry works that emerged during this period. Personal interviews with three dynamic women, who were active early on in this movement—Dorothy Gill Barnes, Patricia Hickman, and Kay Sekimachi—have revealed that an enduring engagement with materials remains central to their ongoing artistic practices. This has resulted ...


Natural Dyes, Our Global Heritage Of Colors, Dominique Cardon Jan 2010

Natural Dyes, Our Global Heritage Of Colors, Dominique Cardon

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

In the past, each civilization throughout the world has selected its own specific range of plant and animal sources of color, each from their respective natural environments. These included dyes and colorants that were used for the hair and skin, for everyday or festive food, for clothing and furnishing textiles, matting, etc. Scientific research into the colorants present in historical and anthropological textiles and objects have revealed a common empiric logic for this selection, and astonishing parallels can be found in the technical processes developed by ancient and traditional dyers of all continents. This lecture will consist of a discussion ...


Fueled By Silk: Victorian Crazy Quilt Mania, Patricia Cox Crews Jan 2010

Fueled By Silk: Victorian Crazy Quilt Mania, Patricia Cox Crews

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Crazy quilts captured the imagination of American women who made thousands of them between 1880 and 1900. But, what sparked this craze at this particular period in time? Most scholars agree that several factors sparked the national rage for Crazy quilts in the late 19th century, the most important factor being the Japanese and British decorative arts displays at the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia in 1876. The other factor mentioned is the availability of affordable silk fabrics.

Specifically, scholars note how fascinated Americans became with the exotic goods displayed at the popular Japanese pavilion at the Centennial Exhibition. Scholars agree ...


Kyrgyz Felt Of The 20th And 21st Centuries, Dinara Chochunbaeva Jan 2010

Kyrgyz Felt Of The 20th And 21st Centuries, Dinara Chochunbaeva

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Kyrgyz people, representing the ancient nomadic civilization of Central Asia, manufactured felt from time immemorial and utilized it in all aspects of their lives. The portable house of Kyrgyz tribes, the yurt, was covered by felt, while the interior decoration and richly ornamented rugs, household goods, clothes, and toys were felt as well.

Felt also had sacral meaning and played an important role in the social life of the tribe. The elected leader was lifted up by tribe members on a piece of white felt, symbolizing public acknowledgment of his power; in funerary traditions a piece of felt was used ...


Trousseaux: From Weaving Handwoven Textiles To Collecting Mass Commodities, Kimberly Hart Jan 2010

Trousseaux: From Weaving Handwoven Textiles To Collecting Mass Commodities, Kimberly Hart

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

In rural Turkey, trousseaux are a personal and socially representative collection of textile practices, economies, and desires. This paper addresses the questions of how, when, why and in what forms handweaving gave way to the collection of mass-produced commodities and handmade goods reflecting urban styles in trousseaux. It considers how local communities abandon cultural heritage production for their own consumption and make the transition to desiring, making and buying decorative goods, which reflect current fashions in both local and national terms. The paper is based on long-term ethnographic research in rural villages in western Anatolia, where handweaving once demonstrated cultural ...


Future Reliquaries, Barbara Heller Jan 2010

Future Reliquaries, Barbara Heller

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

As a tapestry weaver, spinner, and dyer, I cherish the handmade. But, as a full-fledged member of the electronic age, I realize that the haptic has had a hard time maintaining its status. My Future Reliquary Series is an attempt to reconcile three apparently separate but, in my mind, connected histories: weaving, computing, and religion.

Weaving is a binary system of up/down, just as computing is a binary system of on/off. The first computer was a jacquard loom, complete with punch cards. The process of mechanization removed the human hand from weaving. In an analogous manner, today’s ...


Spin Artists, And How The Internet Fuels The Art Yarn Movement, Tracy P. Hudson Jan 2010

Spin Artists, And How The Internet Fuels The Art Yarn Movement, Tracy P. Hudson

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

This presentation examines the surprisingly intimate relationship between handspinning and the Internet, focusing on several individual art yarn spinners. These spinners produce unconventional yarns by experimenting with various techniques, and approach spinning itself as a form of creative expression. In every case, the Internet has been integral to the spinners’ technical and artistic development, career, or expression. A community has formed in which these spinners encourage and challenge each other, pushing the art form ever forward. The spinners interviewed initiate swaps, thematic challenges, technical experiments, and sometimes entire websites online, in order to stimulate the exchange of ideas and images ...


Morphological Differences Between Ramie And Hemp: How These Characteristics Developed Different Procedures In Bast Fiber Producing Industry, Min Sun Hwang Jan 2010

Morphological Differences Between Ramie And Hemp: How These Characteristics Developed Different Procedures In Bast Fiber Producing Industry, Min Sun Hwang

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Ramie and hemp fiber are two major fibers among the four traditional fibers (cotton, wool, hemp, and ramie) of Korea. They have a very long history going back to as early as the first century AD Ramie fabric, as summer clothing, was enjoyed by upper class/royal families and scholars. On the other hand, hemp fabric was worn by the lower class, such as people who worked in labor intensive fields. Hemp fabrics were also used for funerary costumes and shrouds; this tradition continues to the present time.

After four years of on-site research, I presented two papers on two ...


Mapping Textile Space: Stitched And Woven Terrains, Elizabeth Ingraham Jan 2010

Mapping Textile Space: Stitched And Woven Terrains, Elizabeth Ingraham

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Mapping is a fundamental way of converting personal knowledge to transmittable knowledge and maps are unique in the way they use space to represent space. Maps are selective in what they choose to represent, seductive in their contours and calligraphic marks and powerful in their ability to locate, describe, demarcate and ground.

I will present a visually rich journey through the work of contemporary artists who use stitching and weaving to map both literal and metaphorical terrains in a textile space. Among the artists we will look at are:
• Linda Gass, whose stitched topographic reliefs are at once descriptive aerial ...


Geometric Abstraction In Pre-Columbian Tapestry And Its Enduring Influence, Susan Iverson Jan 2010

Geometric Abstraction In Pre-Columbian Tapestry And Its Enduring Influence, Susan Iverson

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Making art requires looking back and looking forward while maintaining a strong presence in the current cultural world. As a tapestry weaver, when I look back, I look at pre-Columbian weaving for inspiration. It is looking at the art and architecture of these ancient cultures that has allowed me to appreciate weaving as the basis for geometric pattern and abstraction. With an understanding that they developed their images for completely different reasons than those of the contemporary artist, I respond to their respect for the woven grid and their apparent desire to work with this structure instead of against it ...


Handwork As A Conceptual Strategy, Jane Kidd Jan 2010

Handwork As A Conceptual Strategy, Jane Kidd

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

This paper will discuss my commitment to the material identity of woven tapestry as an artistic practice and my interest in the handmade as a conceptual strategy and counterpoint to the immediacy and temporal nature of contemporary culture.

Much of the work in the milieu of contemporary fibre is moving away from the handmade object to embrace installation, intervention, digital technology and hybrid approaches to material and process. The discreet material identity of traditional textile processes like woven tapestry seem out of step, bringing into question the value of skill, disciplinarity and the handmade object.

Throughout my practice, skill and ...


The Way Of Sami Duodji: From Nomadic Necessity To Trademarked Lifestyle, Desiree Koslin Jan 2010

The Way Of Sami Duodji: From Nomadic Necessity To Trademarked Lifestyle, Desiree Koslin

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

The Sami people of Northwestern Eurasia in Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia share historical vicissitudes brought upon them with most other First Peoples. Their languages were suppressed, their religion and culture obliterated, and their way of life ultimately condemned to marginality. In a painful process that was first given wider attention in texts of the seventeenth century, the Sami were given few options for survival but to acquiesce and adapt to the dictates issued, largely losing their cultural identity in the process.

Today, thanks to extensive advocacy of Sami activists starting in the 1960s, a reawakened Sami identity is fostered ...


Low Tech Transmission: European Tapestry To High Tech America, Christine Laffer Jan 2010

Low Tech Transmission: European Tapestry To High Tech America, Christine Laffer

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

European tapestry techniques reached the U.S. in several waves of cultural transmission, starting in the late 1800s when the first tapestry studios were established on the east coast. The differences between the two continents and their focus on different types of technical knowledge appeared almost instantly. In Europe, institutions guarded the logic and purity of their techniques through systems ranging from educational programs to state-run tapestry studios over several hundred years. In the U.S., tapestry existed primarily as a commercial enterprise serving a small sector of the population over a few decades. Further, the lack of an educational ...


Kitab Al-Hadaya Wa Al-Tuhaf: A Unique Window On Islamic Textiles, Wendy Landry Jan 2010

Kitab Al-Hadaya Wa Al-Tuhaf: A Unique Window On Islamic Textiles, Wendy Landry

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

During the first millennium, a rare kind of literature evolved in the Islamic world that provides a fascinating window on the interest and importance of material objects. A unique example of this literature, entitled Kitab al-Hadaya wa al-Tuhaf [Book of Gifts and Rarities] was translated into English, annotated and published in 1996 by Kuwaiti curator and scholar Ghada al Hijjawi al-Qaddumi. It is an anthology of anecdotes referring to the period between the sixth century and the twelfth century, probably compiled in the late twelfth century by an official in the Islamic Egyptian government.

Although the historical veracity of the ...


Order And Complexity In My Woven Work, Janice Lessman-Moss Jan 2010

Order And Complexity In My Woven Work, Janice Lessman-Moss

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

My art practice revolves around an interest in abstract systems and digital design in combination with the mechanical, mathematical, and material aspects of weaving. The process of weaving conjures images of the sequential mapping of linear time along the length of the warp, while designing on the computer implies speed and layering as in circular time. These two concepts are integrated in the construction and visual interpretation of my woven work. Using the generative capabilities of the computer, sharply defined and regular patterns of shapes are integrated with more organic and seemingly random systems. Their interplay seeks a balance that ...


Invisible No More: The Embellished Abaya In Qatar, Christina Lindholm Jan 2010

Invisible No More: The Embellished Abaya In Qatar, Christina Lindholm

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Shari’a law and local custom dictate that Muslim women in Qatar wear the abaya, an all-encompassing black garment. Supposedly a deterrent to unwanted male attention and a device to protect men from lascivious thoughts, the abaya has rendered women anonymous when in public, silently moving through society as unidentified and all but invisible beings. Increased Western employment, tourism, and media in the forms of magazines, radio, television and the Internet have brought images of Euro-American lifestyles into Arab homes. Higher education for women has resulted in increased female opportunity and independence. Many women travel abroad and every year more ...


Contemporary Interpretation Of An Unusual Navajo Weaving Technique, Connie Lippert Jan 2010

Contemporary Interpretation Of An Unusual Navajo Weaving Technique, Connie Lippert

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

I am not Navajo and, therefore, I do not practice Navajo weaving. I do use the wedge weave technique that was practiced by the Navajo for a period in the late 1800s. A Navajo wedge weave is easily recognizable because of the colors used and the shapes consistent with other Navajo weaving. Although I use the same technique, my use of color and shape transforms wedge weave into a contemporary weave.

Wedge weave is an unusual form of tapestry. Pictorial imagery is not its goal. Instead, the weft is woven in such a way that the actual horizontal-vertical structure of ...


Colcha Embroidery As Cartography: Mapping Landscapes Of Memory And Passage, Suzanne P. Macaulay Jan 2010

Colcha Embroidery As Cartography: Mapping Landscapes Of Memory And Passage, Suzanne P. Macaulay

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Stitching is one of the oldest forms or technologies of textile craft – if we regard technology in its elemental sense as artistry, process, invention or method. This presentation explores the notion of embroidered maps as creations of a cartographic visionary imagination. In terms of the Symposium’s theme promoting new links between traditional textile-based concepts and contemporary digital processes, these cartographic embroideries are viewed as compositions of space-time in which landscapes are rendered as illusions of three dimensions (space) with an implied fourth dimension (time). In these pictorial embroideries, time melds with memory in order to transcend the physical division ...


Synthetic Fibers, Showy Cars And Sportshirts: Liberating The Fashion Spirit Of “The Man In The Gray Flannel Suit”, Diane Maglio Jan 2010

Synthetic Fibers, Showy Cars And Sportshirts: Liberating The Fashion Spirit Of “The Man In The Gray Flannel Suit”, Diane Maglio

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

We want to sing the man at the wheel, who hurls the lance of his spirit across the earth, along the circle of its orbit. F. T. Marinetti Futurists of 1911 celebrated technology, the beauty of speed and racing cars with “great pipes, like serpents of explosive breath.” They integrated their philosophy with a Manifesto of Men’s Clothing extolling comfort, joyful practicality and illumination –light even in the rain. In the 1950s, American men followed the path of the Futurists driving dream cars with spectacular tail fins and fashionable synthetic jacquard upholstery while dressing in sport shirts of expressive ...


New Insights From The Archives: Historicizing The Political Economy Of Navajo Weaving And Wool Growing, Kathy M'Closkey Jan 2010

New Insights From The Archives: Historicizing The Political Economy Of Navajo Weaving And Wool Growing, Kathy M'Closkey

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

After the formation of the reservation in 1868, the government issued licenses to regulate trade in wool, textiles, and pelts that traders acquired from Navajos. In 1890, blanket sales were 10% of wool sales; by 1930, weavers processed one-third of the clip, their textiles were valued at $1 million, and provided one-third of reservation income. Only Navajos raised hardy coarse-wooled churros whose wool is ideal for hand processing. Recently analyzed archival evidence reveals that blankets were transformed into rugs when tariff removal (1894-97) triggered imports of one billion pounds of duty-free wool, much of it from China. Thus Navajos underwent ...


Tradition Embraces “The New”: Depictions Of Modernity On Japanese Kurume E-Gasuri Futon-Ji, Ann Marie Moeller Jan 2010

Tradition Embraces “The New”: Depictions Of Modernity On Japanese Kurume E-Gasuri Futon-Ji, Ann Marie Moeller

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Kurume is a city on Kyushu Island in Japan known for producing dramatic hand-woven e-gasuri (picture ikat) futon-ji (bedding covers). The most famous have a single picture which runs across four or five panels. Both the warp and weft threads were resist dyed using indigo before being woven into a single long and narrow length of fabric. This cloth was then cut into the panel sections and sewn together. Extraordinary skill was required to both accurately tie the areas of thread to be resisted and to maintain a consistent tension when weaving the fabric. This precision produced complex designs with ...


Cutting Through The Surface: The Use Of Laser Cutting Technology With Traditional Textile Process, Jessica Payne Jan 2010

Cutting Through The Surface: The Use Of Laser Cutting Technology With Traditional Textile Process, Jessica Payne

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Laser cutting technology is now widely associated with textiles, but prior to the research of designers such as Janet Stoyel, in the early 1990s, it was regarded as a non textile specific technology. Over the past ten years many contemporary designers have used laser technology in conjunction with textiles; leading to the widely seen ‘cut through’ design aesthetic, as exemplified by the work of product designer, Tord Boontje. The technology, however, has not been vigorously exploited and tested in conjunction with traditional textile processes such as flocking, foiling, and print. This paper discusses and discloses my recent research which investigates ...


Tracing Cochineal Through The Collection Of The Metropolitan Museum, Elena Phipps, Nobuko Shibayama Jan 2010

Tracing Cochineal Through The Collection Of The Metropolitan Museum, Elena Phipps, Nobuko Shibayama

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Cochineal, with its origin in the Americas, by the 16th century was exported throughout the world. From the time of the Spanish encounter with the Americas in the late 15th and early 16th century, a dyestuff for a strong, fast, red color was in high demand. While many archival documents and scholarly writing exist on the use and shipment of cochineal throughout the world, and on its impact on the textile industry, this paper traces the pathway of its use through an examination of artworks in the Metropolitan Museum. Scientific analysis aids the study in the identification of cochineal (and ...