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1994

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Full-Text Articles in Art and Design

Review Of: Australian Rock Art: A New Synthesis, Paul Faulstich Oct 1994

Review Of: Australian Rock Art: A New Synthesis, Paul Faulstich

Pitzer Faculty Publications and Research

Rock-art studies have now come of age, and are among the most fertile explorations of expressive culture. Through an interdisciplinary approach to its study, we have expanded our knowledge into the realms of aesthetics, belief systems, and social structures. Australian rock an is particularly significant, since it is a visual expression that has been practiced by contemporary as well as prehistoric Aboriginals. Robert Layton's most recent book -his "new synthesis" of Australian rock art- is an ambitious and successful analysis of Aboriginal rock art from across the continent.


Gloria Patri, Gender, And The Gulf War: A Conversation With Mary Kelly, James Castonguay, Amelie Hastie, Lynne Joyrich, Christopher Lane, Kathleen Woodward Oct 1994

Gloria Patri, Gender, And The Gulf War: A Conversation With Mary Kelly, James Castonguay, Amelie Hastie, Lynne Joyrich, Christopher Lane, Kathleen Woodward

Communication and Media Arts Faculty Publications

Mary Kelly's gallery size installation, entitled Gloria Patri, was first shown at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum, Cornell University in 1992. Gloria Patri focuses on the issues of heroism, mastery, and war within the context of a pathologized masculinity; that is, on the identification by both men and women with masculine ideals of mastery, domination, and control, and their simultaneous physical and psychological collapse. This crisis of masculine mastery is set against the backdrop of the Persian Gulf War.


Textile Society Of America Newsletter 6:17 – Fall 1994 Oct 1994

Textile Society Of America Newsletter 6:17 – Fall 1994

Textile Society of America Newsletters

Our New President: Mattiebelle Gittinger
Expanding TSA Membership Goals
Board of Directors
Letter from the President
Symposium Highlights
Special Interest Group Meetings in Los Angeles
Letter from the Editor
Announcements
Calls for Papers
Electronic Communication
National Museum of the American Indian
Pacific Textile Arts
The Medieval Dress and Textile Society
Complex Weavers
Philadelphia College of Textiles and Science
Positions Available
Study Tour to Morocco
Travel
Study Tour to Japan
Weaving Tour of Bolivia
Lectures/Symposia/Conferences/Seminars
Exhibitions- Past, Present, and Future


An Investigation Of Small Apparel Retailers’ Definition Of Customer Satisfaction Using A Naturalistic Approach, Sandra L. Cardillo Aug 1994

An Investigation Of Small Apparel Retailers’ Definition Of Customer Satisfaction Using A Naturalistic Approach, Sandra L. Cardillo

Open-Access* Master's Theses from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln

This study uses an inductive research design to approach customer satisfaction from the perspective of the small apparel retailer. Social exchange theory served as a theoretical framework. The small apparel retailers interviewed in this study had businesses in non-metropolitan communities located in counties with an agricultural, trade, or diversified economic base. Using a qualitative methodology, hypotheses were generated for future study of small apparel retailers’ definition of customer satisfaction. The work done in this study proposes that customer satisfaction, from small apparel retailers’ perspective is a dynamic, multidimensional process requiring the constant evaluation of exchanges that take place between the ...


Caid Currents: The State Of Caid Art, Del Coates Jul 1994

Caid Currents: The State Of Caid Art, Del Coates

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Conservation Of Textile Items, Shirley Niemeyer, Patricia Cox Crews Apr 1994

Conservation Of Textile Items, Shirley Niemeyer, Patricia Cox Crews

Faculty Publications - Textiles, Merchandising and Fashion Design

Textile heirlooms and keepsakes require special care to preserve them for future use. Conserving textile keepsakes and heirlooms involves an understanding of light, temperature, humidity, insects, storage, display, and cleaning.


Textile Society Of America Newsletter 6 – Spring 1994 Apr 1994

Textile Society Of America Newsletter 6 – Spring 1994

Textile Society of America Newsletters

TSA’s Fall Symposium
Letter from the President
1994 Nominees Approved by the Board
In Memoriam
Letter from the Editor
Lillian Elliott: A Profile
Joanne Segal Brandford: A Profile
Announcements
Calls for Papers
Memorial Fund Established
Symposia/Conferences/Seminars – Past/Present/Future
The Eastern Region’s Late Spring Tour of the Renwick Gallery’s Exhibition of Contemporary Navajo Weaving
TSA Bibliography Announced


Characters: Portraits By Robert Weaver, George W. Neubert Jan 1994

Characters: Portraits By Robert Weaver, George W. Neubert

Sheldon Museum of Art Catalogues and Publications

character n -S 1: a distinctive differentiating mark: ... d: a conventionalized figure, representation, or expression ... 2: CHARACTERISTIC: as a 0): one of the essentials of structure, form, materials, or function that together make up and usually distinguish the individual: any feature used to separate distinguishable things (as organisms) into categories ... (3): the aggregate of distinctive qualities characteristic of a breed, strain, or type b: the complex of accustomed mental and moral characteristics and habitual ethical traits marking a person, group, or nation or serving to individualize it c: main or essential nature esp. as strongly marked and serving to distinguish ...


Pictures On Stone: American Color Lithography, Daphne A. Deeds Jan 1994

Pictures On Stone: American Color Lithography, Daphne A. Deeds

Sheldon Museum of Art Catalogues and Publications

Art is often defined as the mirror of society. Chromolithography fulfills that defmition because it was invented in response to the changing demographics of post -Civil War America. During the period 1860-1900 a variety of social changes transformed America from a small agrarian society to a giant industrial nation poised on the brink of joining the modem international world. Many aspects of American life were imbued with an egalitarian spirit. The new democracy was especially evident in the reformed educational system. For the first time in U.S. history, public schools were mandated for all U.S. children, and land-grant ...


Technology And Change: The Incorporation Of Synthetic Dye Techniques In Abeokuta, Southwestern Nigeria, Judith Byfield Jan 1994

Technology And Change: The Incorporation Of Synthetic Dye Techniques In Abeokuta, Southwestern Nigeria, Judith Byfield

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

In the oriki (appellations) of an 18th-century oba (king) in Okuku, references to cloth and indigo were included in the verses that attested to the oba's wealth and greatness,

Abioye, my father, Olugbola, one who takes the image and all its children to dance

The beauty of cloth dyed in indigo does not fade

Adewale, the indigo is what gives the cloth its worth

The references suggestively point to the aesthetic as well as commercial value of indigo in Yoruba society. Scholars and travelers have long noted the importance of indigo dyed cloth in Yoruba society, and Yoruba women ...


Textile Society Of America Newsletter 6:15 – Winter 1994 Jan 1994

Textile Society Of America Newsletter 6:15 – Winter 1994

Textile Society of America Newsletters

Technical Issues
Fiber Identification
Letter from the President
In Memoriam
Letter from the Editor
Travel
Announcements
Calls for Papers
Conferences, Meetings, Symposia
Wanted: Saris to Photograph
Lectures, Workshops & Classes
Fellowships, Grants, Internships
People
Exhibitions
Membership Information
Symposia/Conferences/Seminars – Past/Present/Future
The Eastern Region’s Late Spring Tour of the Renwick Gallery’s Exhibition of Contemporary Navajo Weaving
TSA Bibliography Announced


Steinbeck's Portraits Of Prostitutes: Progression Of An Author's Vision, Rhonda Jenkins Jan 1994

Steinbeck's Portraits Of Prostitutes: Progression Of An Author's Vision, Rhonda Jenkins

Honors College Capstone Experience/Thesis Projects

No abstract provided.


Design Education And The Quest For National Identity In Late Imperial Russia: The Case Of The Stroganov School, Wendy Salmond Jan 1994

Design Education And The Quest For National Identity In Late Imperial Russia: The Case Of The Stroganov School, Wendy Salmond

Art Faculty Articles and Research

Traces the history of the Russian arts and crafts school in Moscow, from its prehistory (1825-1859) as a drawing school founded by Count Sergei Stroganov, through the directorships of Victor Butovsky and Nikolai Globa, to the years after 1917 when the school was subsumed into the VHUTEMAS. Explores the theories of design and craft taught at the school, and the art nouveau-like style developed there in the later years of the 19th c.


Paracas Cavernas, Paracas Necroplis, And Ocucaje: Looking At Appropriation And Identity With Only Material Remains, Ann Peters Jan 1994

Paracas Cavernas, Paracas Necroplis, And Ocucaje: Looking At Appropriation And Identity With Only Material Remains, Ann Peters

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Paracas Cavernas, Paracas Necropolis, and Ocucaje are groups of burials made some 2000 years ago on the south coast of Peru. The Peruvian coast is a desert, and textiles, basketry, and other artifacts made from plant fiber and animal fiber and other organic materials are preserved there in ancient tombs. The Andes is known for funerary traditions that emphasize the dressing of the dead, with documented preservation of mummified ancestors or funerary bundles, and in some cases their participation as ancestors in kin group and community ritual.

. . .

It is clear that there are continuing relations of contact, appropriation, and both ...


What’S In A Name: The Domestication Of Factory Produced Wax Textiles In Cote D’Ivoire, Kathleen E. Bickford Jan 1994

What’S In A Name: The Domestication Of Factory Produced Wax Textiles In Cote D’Ivoire, Kathleen E. Bickford

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

In a frequently evoked passage from Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare asks "What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet." Yet, as Romeo and Juliet tragically come to learn, human beings make much of names. Indeed, one's name is a significant part of one's social persona; it can describe who we are, it can join us and separate us from others, and it can link us to the past. In a sense, when we are named we are given an identity. Describing the complexities of naming for ...


Wreath And Cap To Veil And Apron: American Modification Of A Slavic Ritual, Patricia Williams Jan 1994

Wreath And Cap To Veil And Apron: American Modification Of A Slavic Ritual, Patricia Williams

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

This paper explores a wedding custom practiced for more than one hundred years in the Chicago area by the descendants of Czech, Polish, and Slovak immigrant women. Through the custom's existence and perpetuation in America, the role of a transitional rite of passage is chronicled in both the process of assimilation and the preservation of ethnic heritage. The original textile symbols used in the ritual were modified to reflect the differences in culture in the United States but with the "echoes" of European folk tradition still heard. Chicagoans today have continued to modify the custom as the role of ...


The Conversion Of Chinese Court Robes Into Japanese Festival Hangings, Gloria Granz Gonick Jan 1994

The Conversion Of Chinese Court Robes Into Japanese Festival Hangings, Gloria Granz Gonick

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Decorated silken robes historically worn in China to garb the emperor and his family were disassembled and resewn in Japan into hangings for Kyoto's Gion Festival during the 16th to 18th centuries. The twenty robes, which were converted into coverings for festival carts called yama and hoko, include silk tapestry weaves (kesi), brocades, and embroidered examples. Eleven date from the Ming Dynasty (1368–1644) and nine from the early to mid Qing Dynasty (1644–1911). This distribution contrasts with other world collections of Chinese imperial robes, in which Qing Dynasty examples are far more numerous. In addition to the ...


The Transformation Of Men Into Masquerades And Indian Madras Into Masquerade Cloth In Buguma, Nigeria, Elisha P. Renne, Joanne B. Eicher Jan 1994

The Transformation Of Men Into Masquerades And Indian Madras Into Masquerade Cloth In Buguma, Nigeria, Elisha P. Renne, Joanne B. Eicher

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

The Kalahari Ijo people of the Niger Delta area of southeastern Nigeria use a group of dark indigo-blue cloths with white patterning to cover the faces of masquerade performers. Subsumed under the name of alubite (masquerade cloth) are at least three distinct types: (1) ukara cloth, an indigo-resist of imported muslin, stitched and dyed by Igbo craftsmen, (2) alubite cloth, a gauze-weave, also an indigo-resist, but of unknown provenance, and (3) pelete bite, an Indian madras from which threads are cut and pulled by Kalahari women to form a new pattern.

The first two types of cloth apparently come from ...


Bolong-Bolong And Tirtanadi: An Unknown Group Of Balinese Textiles, Marie-Louise Nabholz-Kartaschoff, Monika Palm-Nadolny Jan 1994

Bolong-Bolong And Tirtanadi: An Unknown Group Of Balinese Textiles, Marie-Louise Nabholz-Kartaschoff, Monika Palm-Nadolny

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

On late 19th- and early 20th-century photographs, South and East Balinese people clad in traditional adat wardrobe for rituals, temple ceremonies, and dances often wear transparent, netlike open-work textiles as breastcloth (anteng), shouldercloth (cerik) girdle (selendang), or headcloth (destar, lelunakan). Information given by elderly Balinese concerning the situation before World War II confirm their use as part of their ceremonial wardrobe but also as important items in offerings and rituals. Such textiles could be laid over several fabrics, covering the body of a toothfiling candidate, or serve as curtains (langse) for open pavilions or as an underlay (tatakan) for offerings ...


Supplementary Weft On An "Ikat" Isle: The Weaving Communities Of Northwestern Flores, Roy W. Hamilton Jan 1994

Supplementary Weft On An "Ikat" Isle: The Weaving Communities Of Northwestern Flores, Roy W. Hamilton

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Among textile enthusiasts, the island of Flores is known primarily for its beautiful warp-ikat cloths. Most of the island's numerous ethno-linguistic groups, including the Ngadha, Nage, Endenese, Lio, Palu'e, Sikkanese, and Lamaholot, produce related yet distinctive textiles within this tradition. It is therefore surprising to find a series of weaving districts, stretching along the northwest coast of the island, where the ikat technique is not used. Instead, weavers in this region produce indigo-dyed textiles decorated with colorful supplementary-weft motifs.

In the ikat districts, sarongs for men and women differ in their patterning and in the names applied to ...


Contact, Crossover, Continuity: The Emergence And Development Of The Two Basic Lace Techniques, Santina Levey, Milton Sonday Jan 1994

Contact, Crossover, Continuity: The Emergence And Development Of The Two Basic Lace Techniques, Santina Levey, Milton Sonday

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

According to the present understanding of the term, lace is a soft pliable fabric, most often white, with a pattern composed of solid and open areas, made either with a needle and thread in a looped structure or with a variable number of threads wound on bobbins and interlaced in a form of braiding. Laces matching that description survive from the mid 17th century onward, with some needle and bobbin-made examples that at first glance appear indistinguishable. Yet each of these totally unrelated techniques has its own history. The purpose of our project is to trace how it happened that ...


Byzantine Influences Along The Silk Route: Central Asian Silks Transformed, Anna Maria Muthesius Jan 1994

Byzantine Influences Along The Silk Route: Central Asian Silks Transformed, Anna Maria Muthesius

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Silks traded along the ancient Silk Route were precious, light, and easily transportable commodities that served as ideal vehicles for cross-cultural exchange. The survival of several hundred Central Asian silks, variously datable between the seventh and the eleventh centuries, presents an opportunity to trace patterns of trade, diplomacy and cross-cultural developments at the heart of the Silk Road. These silks perfectly mirror contact, cross over, and change fostered under the auspices of Mediterranean/Near Eastern economic and diplomatic exchange.

This paper will ask three questions:

1. What lay behind Byzantine influence in Central Asia along the ancient Silk Route?

2 ...


Ottoman Silks And Their Legacy, Diane Mott Jan 1994

Ottoman Silks And Their Legacy, Diane Mott

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

During the late Middle Ages and the early Renaissance, luxury silks of Asia that had for centuries trickled into Europe began to enter in large numbers, fueling an appetite for the rich and exotic that was to have a lasting effect on Western textile design. In turn, expanded trade with the Levant carried Western designs and advances in weaving eastward. The Ottoman Empire, standing at the thresholds of Europe and Asia, was perfectly poised to transmit these East-West currents. Weavers in manufactories in the successive Ottoman capitals of Bursa and Istanbul, the western outposts of the Asiatic silk routes, absorbed ...


From Bohemian To Bourgeois: American Batik In The Early Twentieth Century, Nicola J. Shilliam Jan 1994

From Bohemian To Bourgeois: American Batik In The Early Twentieth Century, Nicola J. Shilliam

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

In 1919 Pieter Mijer wrote in his influential book Batiks and How to Make Them, "Batik is still a comparatively recent importation; brought here some ten years ago, it was met with absolute incomprehension and lack of interest, but its real merit as a means of decorating fabrics has earned it a place in the industrial art of the nation and year by year it is gaining wider recognition."

This paper briefly considers the rise and fall in popularity of batik in America in the period Mijer indicated: how it changed from being a foreign import chiefly seen in museums ...


0596: C. Clifford Caverlee Collection, 1895-1981, Marshall University Special Collections Jan 1994

0596: C. Clifford Caverlee Collection, 1895-1981, Marshall University Special Collections

Guides to Manuscript Collections

The collection consists of two boxes containing 12 three-ring notebooks, a third box containing file folders of postmarks and envelopes from states other than West Virginia, also two scrapbooks containing other postmarked envelopes. The bulk of the collection consists of 12 three-ring notebooks containing postmarks and postcards of West Virginia towns and post offices. These notebooks are organized by West Virginia county. Many of the postmarks are on the complete, original envelope, but many have been cut off the envelopes. The postcards fall into three classes: plain blank postcards with just a postmark, holiday or greeting postcards, and the scenic ...


Ancient Andean Headgear: Medium And Measure Of Cultural Identity, Niki R. Clark, Amy Oakland Rodman Jan 1994

Ancient Andean Headgear: Medium And Measure Of Cultural Identity, Niki R. Clark, Amy Oakland Rodman

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

From the earliest recorded periods of southern Andean history, distinctive clothing styles have served to identity specific socio-cultural groups and provide clues about cultural origins. Unique environmental conditions, especially present along the arid Pacific coast of South America, have allowed the preservation of a vast archive of usually perishable material. From the far south coast of Peru to the northern desert regions of Chile, textiles, and especially headgear forms were worn to distinguish between the diverse populations who established permanent settlements along the narrow river valleys linking highland regions and the coast.

The south central Andes region has always known ...


Anni Albers: Pre-Columbian Resonances: The Significance Of Pre-Columbian Art In Her Textiles And Writings, Virginia Gardner Troy Jan 1994

Anni Albers: Pre-Columbian Resonances: The Significance Of Pre-Columbian Art In Her Textiles And Writings, Virginia Gardner Troy

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Anni Albers is known primarily for her contribution to the Bauhaus Weaving Workshop and her woven prototypes for industrial production; she has rarely been acknowledged for her role in reviving and redefining the Pre-Columbian fiber art tradition. She researched, analyzed, collected, and extensively wrote about Pre-Columbian textiles. Her seminal text, On Weaving, 1965, is not only dedicated to Andean weavers, "my great teachers, the weavers of ancient Peru," but is essentially a textbook of Andean weaving techniques, revived and meticulously analyzed by Albers. Furthermore, she and her husband, Josef Albers, amassed an important collection of ancient Mesoamerican sculpture, acquired during ...


(Re-)Fashioning Identity: Late Twentieth-Century Transformations In Dress And Society In Boliva, Elayne Zorn Jan 1994

(Re-)Fashioning Identity: Late Twentieth-Century Transformations In Dress And Society In Boliva, Elayne Zorn

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

The members of most of Bolivia's large indigenous ethnic groups, such as the nearly 22,000 people of ayllu Sakaka of northern Potosi, continue to wear a distinctive daily dress. Such dress nationally and internationally is emblematic of the Sakaka's separate, and to many inferior, identity as Indians. To the wearers also, or perhaps fundamentally, such dress marks a division between clothed indigenous humans (runa) and naked foreign outsiders (q'ara). This interpretation coincides with hegemonic non-Indian evaluations of Indian separateness, but reverses the hierarchy.

Yet most members of these large indigenous ethnic groups, whom I refer to ...


Ethnic Artists And The Appropriation Of Fashion: Embroidery And Identity In The Colca Valley, Peru, Blenda Femenías Jan 1994

Ethnic Artists And The Appropriation Of Fashion: Embroidery And Identity In The Colca Valley, Peru, Blenda Femenías

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

"When I'm in Arequipa and I see a lady in embroidered clothes, I always greet her; she's from my land, she's my compatriot. . . . [When I teach embroidery] no matter how much one teaches, the motifs don't come out the same. If there are twenty embroiderers, twenty different motifs come out although they have the same name. It's like, even if you're my brother, we're not the same."

These comments by embroidery artist Leonardo Mejfa neatly express the character of Colca Valley ethnic clothes: simultaneously shared and individual. Similar appearance is important in recognizing ...


Dressing The Part: Indigenous Costume As Political And Cultural Discourse In Peru, Katharine E. Seibold Jan 1994

Dressing The Part: Indigenous Costume As Political And Cultural Discourse In Peru, Katharine E. Seibold

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

In Latin America, indigenous clothing has often been equated with indigenous cultural identity. When we speak of indigenous fashion as being a marker of cultural identity, we must also examine the more fluid roles of the indigenous individual and community within the state. How is individual, community, and state identity represented? What form does the discourse between the individual, the community, and the state take? Many anthropologists have written of the flexible and strategic use of ethnicity, and costume as a primary tool in the manipulation of ethnic identity. Indigenous, handwoven dress legitimates community as well as ethnic group membership ...