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Full-Text Articles in Art and Design

Commonthought (Fall 1994), Lesley College Oct 1994

Commonthought (Fall 1994), Lesley College

Commonthought

This issue features works created by Lesley University students and covers a broad range of topics. The work itself crosses many disciplines from creative writing to visual arts.


Gloria Patri, Gender, And The Gulf War: A Conversation With Mary Kelly, James Castonguay, Amelie Hastie, Lynne Joyrich, Christopher Lane, Kathleen Woodward Oct 1994

Gloria Patri, Gender, And The Gulf War: A Conversation With Mary Kelly, James Castonguay, Amelie Hastie, Lynne Joyrich, Christopher Lane, Kathleen Woodward

Communication, Media & The Arts Faculty Publications

Mary Kelly's gallery size installation, entitled Gloria Patri, was first shown at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum, Cornell University in 1992. Gloria Patri focuses on the issues of heroism, mastery, and war within the context of a pathologized masculinity; that is, on the identification by both men and women with masculine ideals of mastery, domination, and control, and their simultaneous physical and psychological collapse. This crisis of masculine mastery is set against the backdrop of the Persian Gulf War.


Winslow Homer’S Seascapes: Transcendental Subjects, Popular Resorts, Critical Reactions, Priscilla Paton Sep 1994

Winslow Homer’S Seascapes: Transcendental Subjects, Popular Resorts, Critical Reactions, Priscilla Paton

Maine History

Winslow Homer, acknowledged as a quintessential Yankee and one of America 's foremost nineteenth century artists, seems as formidable, stern, and ambiguous as the rocky shores that fascinated him. Homer's reception by critics highlights the impossibility of separating artistic achievement from the tastes and fashions of the society in which the artist worked. The “mystifyingly blank" faces that critics abhorred in Homer's early farm figures became the distinctively attractive features of his later seascapes.


Inscape Spring 1994, Morehead State University Apr 1994

Inscape Spring 1994, Morehead State University

Inscape: Art & Literary Magazine Archive

The Spring 1994 edition of the Inscape: Literary and Art Magazine.


The Life And Times Of Joseph Beuys, Agnieszka Taborska, Marcin Gizycki, Mark Snyder, Margaret Lewis, Julie Strandberg, Maki Koto, Yvonne Roe, Sven Armster, Ting-Ting Lee, Luciana Mallozzi, Lucinda Wolf, Christine Pellicano, James Bewley, Leah Smith, Matthew Saam, Dawn Marie Caulfield, Ellen Godena, Catherine Warner, Roy Fabian, Shirly Whong, Scott King, Megan Mclarney, Lucinda Wolfe, Andrew Feder Feb 1994

The Life And Times Of Joseph Beuys, Agnieszka Taborska, Marcin Gizycki, Mark Snyder, Margaret Lewis, Julie Strandberg, Maki Koto, Yvonne Roe, Sven Armster, Ting-Ting Lee, Luciana Mallozzi, Lucinda Wolf, Christine Pellicano, James Bewley, Leah Smith, Matthew Saam, Dawn Marie Caulfield, Ellen Godena, Catherine Warner, Roy Fabian, Shirly Whong, Scott King, Megan Mclarney, Lucinda Wolfe, Andrew Feder

Programs

Program for the seventh annual RISD Cabaret held in the Waterman Building. Graphic design: Mark Snyder; program editor: Margaret Lewis; program photography: Marcin Gizycki.


One Hundred Years Of Street Photography, Ronald R. Geibert, Wright State University Art Galleries Feb 1994

One Hundred Years Of Street Photography, Ronald R. Geibert, Wright State University Art Galleries

Exhibition and Program Catalogs

A program from an exhibition featuring street photography from a variety of artists including but not limited to Diane Arbus, Alfred Stieglitz, Henri Cartie Bresson, and many more. One Hundred Years of Street Photography ran from February 20 through April 3, 1994. The catalog for this exhibition was originally available via CD-ROM.


J.J. Lankes (1884-1960): Woodcuts Of Rural America, University Of Richmond Museums Jan 1994

J.J. Lankes (1884-1960): Woodcuts Of Rural America, University Of Richmond Museums

Exhibition Brochures

J.J. Lankes (1884-1960): Woodcuts of Rural America

1994

Marsh Art Gallery, University of Richmond Museums

Introduction

In 1917, while working at the Newton Arms Company factory in Buffalo, New York, Julius John (J. J.) Lankes created his first woodcut. His only implements were a graver, used to score rifle stocks, and a block of apple wood he had cut from a fallen tree. The experiment proved a turning point in the life of the thirty-one-year-old laborer, draftsman, and erstwhile art student. Rapidly mastering the difficult white on black woodcutting technique, he went on to produce some 1,300 designs ...


Daniel Serra-Badué: Dreamt Reality, University Of Richmond Museums Jan 1994

Daniel Serra-Badué: Dreamt Reality, University Of Richmond Museums

Exhibition Brochures

Daniel Serra-Badué: Dreamt Reality

1994

Marsh Art Gallery

Introduction

Daniel Serra-Badué is an artist of uncompromising vision who dwells upon memory as if it were tangible. "All that we see or seem - Is but a dream within a dream," wrote Edgar Allan Poe , and Serra-Badué seeks to place his audience within that dream. His evocative images compel us toward experiences that combine described reality with surreal impossibilities and dreamlike remembrances. Serra-Badué's world is a world of dreamt reality.

The lithographs in this exhibition, ranging in date from 1964 to 1992, demonstrate Serra-Badué's mastery of clarity of line, exactitude ...


Ukiyo-E: Japanese Prints Of The Floating World, University Of Richmond Museums Jan 1994

Ukiyo-E: Japanese Prints Of The Floating World, University Of Richmond Museums

Exhibition Brochures

Ukiyo-e: Japanese Prints of the Floating World

March 3 to April 17, 1994

Marsh Art Gallery

Introduction

This ukiyo-e exhibition reveals the tantalizing range of images in Japanese prints of the floating world. A seventeenth-century Japanese writer described that world as: "singing songs, drinking wine, and diverting ourselves just in floating, floating ... like a gourd with the river current." Reflecting a sense of the world as an ephemeral place of no lasting value, the floating world was an escape from the present into fantasy and pleasure. Hopefully, our exhibition will entice you to pursue your own escape into that floating ...


Ephraim Rubenstein: The Rilke Series, University Of Richmond Museums Jan 1994

Ephraim Rubenstein: The Rilke Series, University Of Richmond Museums

Exhibition Brochures

Ephraim Rubenstein: The Rilke Series

January 28 to February 27, 1994

Marsh Art Gallery

Introduction: Rilke and Rubenstein

The first time I met Ephraim Rubenstein, some eight years ago, and looked at his early paintings I immediately sensed a powerful poetic quality coming out of his paintbrush. This ambitious exhibition not only confirms my initial feeling, but surpasses anything I could have thought of at that time. It is rare these days to find a young artist inspired, not by pop culture or the mass media, but by a classic of literature. I find it interesting and refreshing to see ...


Continuity Of Culture: A Reenactor’S Goal, Elizabeth Mcclure Jan 1994

Continuity Of Culture: A Reenactor’S Goal, Elizabeth Mcclure

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

This paper examines the maintenance of cultural continuity through historical reenactment. It is the reenactor's goal, in this case, to portray and maintain the culture of Ireland and Scotland. They are holding on to this culture and presenting it to others by maintaining the dress, crafts, and lifestyles of sixteenth-century Scotland and Ireland.

The methods of data collection for this study were ethnographic in nature. Interviews with key informants were conducted. In addition, there was a questionnaire distributed to members of the group This method of data collection provided the insight to see how a member of this group ...


Ancient Near Eastern Fibers And The Reshaping Of European Clothing, Elizabeth J. W. Barber Jan 1994

Ancient Near Eastern Fibers And The Reshaping Of European Clothing, Elizabeth J. W. Barber

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

In April of 1994, an amazing story hit the news-stands. A group of naturally mummified corpses dated to 2000 BC and later had been found in Chinese Turkestan. Not only were their Caucasian features and blondish hair well preserved by the dry heat of the xinjiang desert, but also their clothes--brightly colored plaids and twills among them (Hadingham 1994). We know from later linguistic records that a group of Indo-European speakers we call the Tocharians had made their way to Xinjiang and the Tarim Basin in early times. We also know that the Indo-Europeans began to spread across Eurasia from ...


Preface - Contact, Crossover, Continuity - 1994, Louise W. Mackie, Patricia R. Anawalt Jan 1994

Preface - Contact, Crossover, Continuity - 1994, Louise W. Mackie, Patricia R. Anawalt

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

The Fourth Biennial Symposium of the Textile Society of America, Inc., was hosted by the Fowler Museum of Cultural History, University of California, Los Angeles, California, September 22–24, 1994. The papers addressed a broad theme which was chosen in order to accommodate the diverse interests of members. The proceedings contains the thirty papers and two abstracts of papers presented at the symposium, plus a video script, and a list of the two hundred and forty participants.

Contact, Crossover, Continuity highlights the causes and effects of change on textiles around the world. The proceedings provides an opportunity to identify and ...


Table Of Contents - Contact, Crossover, Continuity - 1994 Jan 1994

Table Of Contents - Contact, Crossover, Continuity - 1994

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Table of contents from Contact, Crossover, Continuity: Proceedings of the Fourth Biennial Symposium of the Textile Society of America, September 22–24, 1994


Frontmatter - Contact, Crossover, Continuity - 1994 Jan 1994

Frontmatter - Contact, Crossover, Continuity - 1994

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Frontmatter: cover, title page, and copyright page.


Technology And Change: The Incorporation Of Synthetic Dye Techniques In Abeokuta, Southwestern Nigeria, Judith Byfield Jan 1994

Technology And Change: The Incorporation Of Synthetic Dye Techniques In Abeokuta, Southwestern Nigeria, Judith Byfield

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

In the oriki (appellations) of an 18th-century oba (king) in Okuku, references to cloth and indigo were included in the verses that attested to the oba's wealth and greatness,

Abioye, my father, Olugbola, one who takes the image and all its children to dance

The beauty of cloth dyed in indigo does not fade

Adewale, the indigo is what gives the cloth its worth

The references suggestively point to the aesthetic as well as commercial value of indigo in Yoruba society. Scholars and travelers have long noted the importance of indigo dyed cloth in Yoruba society, and Yoruba women ...


What’S In A Name: The Domestication Of Factory Produced Wax Textiles In Cote D’Ivoire, Kathleen E. Bickford Jan 1994

What’S In A Name: The Domestication Of Factory Produced Wax Textiles In Cote D’Ivoire, Kathleen E. Bickford

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

In a frequently evoked passage from Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare asks "What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet." Yet, as Romeo and Juliet tragically come to learn, human beings make much of names. Indeed, one's name is a significant part of one's social persona; it can describe who we are, it can join us and separate us from others, and it can link us to the past. In a sense, when we are named we are given an identity. Describing the complexities of naming for ...


Akwete-Igbo Weavers As Entrepreneurs And Innovators At The Turn Of The Century, Lisa Aronson Jan 1994

Akwete-Igbo Weavers As Entrepreneurs And Innovators At The Turn Of The Century, Lisa Aronson

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

In his discourse on trade commodities, Igor Kopytoff argues that commodities assume what he calls a "cultural biography" through which one sees "the social system and the collective understanding on which it rests" (Kopytoff, 1986:89). What Kopytoff means by this is that commodities take on a life of their own based on the social and economic factors that have come to affect them. This paper will address the "cultural biography" of cloth in Southeastern Nigeria from its origins through trade to its various levels of assimilation both in use and production.

The biography discussed in this paper reaches an ...


Wreath And Cap To Veil And Apron: American Modification Of A Slavic Ritual, Patricia Williams Jan 1994

Wreath And Cap To Veil And Apron: American Modification Of A Slavic Ritual, Patricia Williams

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

This paper explores a wedding custom practiced for more than one hundred years in the Chicago area by the descendants of Czech, Polish, and Slovak immigrant women. Through the custom's existence and perpetuation in America, the role of a transitional rite of passage is chronicled in both the process of assimilation and the preservation of ethnic heritage. The original textile symbols used in the ritual were modified to reflect the differences in culture in the United States but with the "echoes" of European folk tradition still heard. Chicagoans today have continued to modify the custom as the role of ...


The Conversion Of Chinese Court Robes Into Japanese Festival Hangings, Gloria Granz Gonick Jan 1994

The Conversion Of Chinese Court Robes Into Japanese Festival Hangings, Gloria Granz Gonick

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Decorated silken robes historically worn in China to garb the emperor and his family were disassembled and resewn in Japan into hangings for Kyoto's Gion Festival during the 16th to 18th centuries. The twenty robes, which were converted into coverings for festival carts called yama and hoko, include silk tapestry weaves (kesi), brocades, and embroidered examples. Eleven date from the Ming Dynasty (1368–1644) and nine from the early to mid Qing Dynasty (1644–1911). This distribution contrasts with other world collections of Chinese imperial robes, in which Qing Dynasty examples are far more numerous. In addition to the ...


Discussion Of "Textile Transformations And Cultural Continuities In West Africa", Christopher B. Steiner Jan 1994

Discussion Of "Textile Transformations And Cultural Continuities In West Africa", Christopher B. Steiner

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

I have divided my discussion of these papers into two parts. First, I would like briefly to address each of the papers individually—highlighting what I find to be some of the most important issues raised by each. And second, I would like to put forth two dichotomies—(1) regarding the relationship between the sacred and the profane, and (2) on the relationship between aesthetic value and commercial value—both of which strike me as critical organizing principles that join these four papers [those of Judith Byfield, Kathleen Bickford, Lisa Aronson, and Elisha Renne and Joanne Eicher in this proceedings ...


The Transformation Of Men Into Masquerades And Indian Madras Into Masquerade Cloth In Buguma, Nigeria, Elisha P. Renne, Joanne B. Eicher Jan 1994

The Transformation Of Men Into Masquerades And Indian Madras Into Masquerade Cloth In Buguma, Nigeria, Elisha P. Renne, Joanne B. Eicher

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

The Kalahari Ijo people of the Niger Delta area of southeastern Nigeria use a group of dark indigo-blue cloths with white patterning to cover the faces of masquerade performers. Subsumed under the name of alubite (masquerade cloth) are at least three distinct types: (1) ukara cloth, an indigo-resist of imported muslin, stitched and dyed by Igbo craftsmen, (2) alubite cloth, a gauze-weave, also an indigo-resist, but of unknown provenance, and (3) pelete bite, an Indian madras from which threads are cut and pulled by Kalahari women to form a new pattern.

The first two types of cloth apparently come from ...


Green Labels With Golden Elephants: Western European Printed Cottons For Malaysia And Indonesia, Frieda Sorber Jan 1994

Green Labels With Golden Elephants: Western European Printed Cottons For Malaysia And Indonesia, Frieda Sorber

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

In the second half of the 19th century, several Belgian cotton printing firms were involved in the production of imitations of African and Southeast Asian textiles for markets in West-Africa, the Dutch East Indies, and Malaysia. Extensive records of one firm, the Societe Anonyme Texas, owned by the Voortman family in Ghent, have been preserved in the Ghent public records office and the Vrieselhof Textile Museum (Oelegem, near Antwerp). Frans de Vos and Abraham Voortman started a cotton printing establishment in Ghent in 1790. At that time cotton printing was a relatively new type of enterprise in Flanders. The first ...


Bolong-Bolong And Tirtanadi: An Unknown Group Of Balinese Textiles, Marie-Louise Nabholz-Kartaschoff, Monika Palm-Nadolny Jan 1994

Bolong-Bolong And Tirtanadi: An Unknown Group Of Balinese Textiles, Marie-Louise Nabholz-Kartaschoff, Monika Palm-Nadolny

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

On late 19th- and early 20th-century photographs, South and East Balinese people clad in traditional adat wardrobe for rituals, temple ceremonies, and dances often wear transparent, netlike open-work textiles as breastcloth (anteng), shouldercloth (cerik) girdle (selendang), or headcloth (destar, lelunakan). Information given by elderly Balinese concerning the situation before World War II confirm their use as part of their ceremonial wardrobe but also as important items in offerings and rituals. Such textiles could be laid over several fabrics, covering the body of a toothfiling candidate, or serve as curtains (langse) for open pavilions or as an underlay (tatakan) for offerings ...


Micronesian Textiles In Transition: The Woven Tol Of Kosrae, Ann Deegan, Ross Cordy Jan 1994

Micronesian Textiles In Transition: The Woven Tol Of Kosrae, Ann Deegan, Ross Cordy

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

This paper presents findings on the major steps in the transition of the Kosraen tol from traditional clothing, to tourist souvenir, to the end of tol manufacture. An extensive study of the German, French, and English literature of the 19th and 20th centuries was done to piece together the history of the Kosraen tol.

The island of Kosrae, located in the Pacific (4–10°N latitude, 140–163°E longitude), is part of the Federated States of Micronesia. Since earliest European contact it has seen numerous changes in its traditional culture. One of its most beautiful and complex traditional crafts ...


The "Severed Shroud": Local And Imported Textiles In The Mortuary Rites Of An Indonesian People, Penelope Graham Jan 1994

The "Severed Shroud": Local And Imported Textiles In The Mortuary Rites Of An Indonesian People, Penelope Graham

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

This paper explores the significance of local and imported textiles as these interact forming complex categories in the mortuary rites of the Lamaholot-speaking people of the traditional district Lewolema in eastern Flores, Indonesia. Within this regional framework, my account draws primarily on field work in the village of Lewotala. There a person's physical demise elicits diverse social and ritual practices, depending on the deceased's achievements during his or her lifetime and the circumstances surrounding the death. As regards the mortuary sequence that commonly occurs, I will argue that various uses of cloth for exchange purposes mark both the ...


Supplementary Weft On An "Ikat" Isle: The Weaving Communities Of Northwestern Flores, Roy W. Hamilton Jan 1994

Supplementary Weft On An "Ikat" Isle: The Weaving Communities Of Northwestern Flores, Roy W. Hamilton

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Among textile enthusiasts, the island of Flores is known primarily for its beautiful warp-ikat cloths. Most of the island's numerous ethno-linguistic groups, including the Ngadha, Nage, Endenese, Lio, Palu'e, Sikkanese, and Lamaholot, produce related yet distinctive textiles within this tradition. It is therefore surprising to find a series of weaving districts, stretching along the northwest coast of the island, where the ikat technique is not used. Instead, weavers in this region produce indigo-dyed textiles decorated with colorful supplementary-weft motifs.

In the ikat districts, sarongs for men and women differ in their patterning and in the names applied to ...


Contact, Crossover, Continuity: The Emergence And Development Of The Two Basic Lace Techniques, Santina Levey, Milton Sonday Jan 1994

Contact, Crossover, Continuity: The Emergence And Development Of The Two Basic Lace Techniques, Santina Levey, Milton Sonday

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

According to the present understanding of the term, lace is a soft pliable fabric, most often white, with a pattern composed of solid and open areas, made either with a needle and thread in a looped structure or with a variable number of threads wound on bobbins and interlaced in a form of braiding. Laces matching that description survive from the mid 17th century onward, with some needle and bobbin-made examples that at first glance appear indistinguishable. Yet each of these totally unrelated techniques has its own history. The purpose of our project is to trace how it happened that ...


The Influence Of Computer Technologies On Contemporary Woven Fiber Art, Cynthia Schira Jan 1994

The Influence Of Computer Technologies On Contemporary Woven Fiber Art, Cynthia Schira

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

It is generally agreed upon, by both the participants in the field and those few who have chronicled it, that the fiber art movement as we know it today began with Jean Lurcat in France in the late 1950s. He was among the first, if not the first, to make designs or cartoons specifically for the medium of tapestry. Previously, paintings were translated into the medium of tapestry. As well as creating the design or cartoon, he personally oversaw the actual weaving process. This direct connection between the process and the concept or image, the manual and the mind, laid ...


The Pomegranate Pattern In Italian Renaissance Textiles: Origins And Influence, Rosalia Bonito Fanelli Jan 1994

The Pomegranate Pattern In Italian Renaissance Textiles: Origins And Influence, Rosalia Bonito Fanelli

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

The term "pomegranate motif" includes a series of vegetal patterns—the pine cone, the artichoke, the thistle, variants of the tree-of-life motif, and, in particular, the lotus and the palmette. These last two patterns were closely studied by Alois Riegl in his 1893 work Stilfragen (Problems of Style). The term itself came into use during the period of historic revivalism in the latter half of the nineteenth century. At that time important design theorists and practitioners such as Owen Jones, William Morris, and Walter Crane dedicated space in their writings with accompanying plates to the reconstruction of Renaissance pomegranate patterns ...