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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

A Through G, Brian Glaser Jan 2007

A Through G, Brian Glaser

English Faculty Creative Works

No abstract provided.


Masculine Fecundity And ‘Overinclusiveness’: Imagery Of Pregnancy In Wallace Stevens’ Poetry, Brian Glaser Jan 2007

Masculine Fecundity And ‘Overinclusiveness’: Imagery Of Pregnancy In Wallace Stevens’ Poetry, Brian Glaser

English Faculty Articles and Research

This article reflects on the imagery of pregnancy in the poetry of Wallace Stevens. It notes that the decision of Stevens to change the use of imagery of pregnancy indicates something about a development in his inner life. The images of his later poems show a diminishment of his earlier tendency to associate birth with death which is a sign of his increasing tolerance of the envious desire to be pregnant. The imagination of Stevens matured over twenty years and the changes in images of pregnancy are a measure of that change.


Even Santa Has Bad Days: The Rainy Day Christmas Card, Charles "Chip" Kaufmann Jan 2007

Even Santa Has Bad Days: The Rainy Day Christmas Card, Charles "Chip" Kaufmann

Maine History

The Rainy Day Christmas Card, donated to the Maine Historical Society Library by Earl Shettleworth, was designed by Rafael Tuck & Sons in London and printed in the 1880s or 1890s at the First Fine Arts Works Studios, Saxony. Other Victorian Christmas cards produced by Tuck (1821-1900) contain similarly un-Christmas-like images: a bouquet of damask roses; wild flowers; apple blossoms; green Scottish heathland; idyllic fishing nets in a rural village; a country churchyard with newly-green birch trees beyond a waterfall. Clearly, behind the clouds of an English Christmas, somewhere, the sun must be shining.