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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Sacred Spaces, Ikea Johnson Dec 2018

Sacred Spaces, Ikea Johnson

Comparative Woman

No abstract provided.


Smoke And Mirrors, Megan Barrios Dec 2018

Smoke And Mirrors, Megan Barrios

Comparative Woman

No abstract provided.


“Seven Mothers”, Carmela Lanza Dec 2018

“Seven Mothers”, Carmela Lanza

Comparative Woman

No abstract provided.


“Blood Moon”, Carmela Lanza Dec 2018

“Blood Moon”, Carmela Lanza

Comparative Woman

No abstract provided.


Bridging The Works Of Horace, Catullus, Ovid, And Haydock, George Bishop Haydock Jun 2015

Bridging The Works Of Horace, Catullus, Ovid, And Haydock, George Bishop Haydock

Honors Theses

I wrote this thesis to explore the metrical poetry of Horace, Catullus, and Ovid, as well as my own poetry and short fiction. I parsed the Latin poems, word-by-word, and provided literal translations, as well as idiomatic translations of selected poems by Horace and Ovid. In order to link these translations to my short story, Into the Last Good Fight, I wrote three metrical poems that synthesize the themes, concepts, and structures of my story with the themes, concepts, and structures of the Latin poems. To provide an even stronger link between the Latin portion of my thesis and the ...


Just Above Silence By Anna Greki, Lynda Chouiten Dec 2014

Just Above Silence By Anna Greki, Lynda Chouiten

Transference

Translated from the French with commentary by Lynda Chouiten.


A Pearl Among Peas: Sir Gawain And The Green Knight As Post-Homiletic In Retrospective Perspective, Stacy Allura Hostetter Jan 2011

A Pearl Among Peas: Sir Gawain And The Green Knight As Post-Homiletic In Retrospective Perspective, Stacy Allura Hostetter

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The MS Cotton Nero A.x. is a late fourteenth-century vellum manuscript that stands roughly 167 millimeters tall and 118 millimeters wide and resides for viewing pleasure, though safely secured from prying fingers, at the British Library in London. Within its pages lie four poems, presumably by the same anonymous author who is variously referred to as either the Pearl-poet or the Gawain-poet in credit to the manuscript's two most famous works respectively. It is the latter, an alliterative poem titled Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, that this paper humbly, yet eagerly, pays court. An Arthurian tale that ...