Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Arts and Humanities Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Civil War

Discipline
Institution
Publication Year
Publication
Publication Type
File Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 1504

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Miller, John Goodrum, Sr., 1853-1936 (Mss 629), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Feb 2018

Miller, John Goodrum, Sr., 1853-1936 (Mss 629), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 629. Writings of John Goodrum Miller, Sr., a lawyer and native of Caldwell County, Kentucky. Includes a family history, a personal memoir, and manuscript chapters on early Kentucky history, English church history, and the U.S. Constitution. Also includes a small amount of material related to The Black Patch War, Miller’s book on the Night Riders.


Messer, George, 1833-1863 (Sc 3163), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jan 2018

Messer, George, 1833-1863 (Sc 3163), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid and full-text typescripts (Click on "Additional Files" below) for Manuscripts Small Collection 3163. Four letters of George Messer to his wife Lottie Messer, written March-May 1863 from Camp Hobson, Glasgow, Kentucky. He describes preparing the camp’s fortifications and accommodations, the arrival of reinforcements, the presence of nearby Confederates, his novel reading, and the prospects of obtaining a furlough. He relates the prevalence of fighting among the local citizenry and discusses affairs at home such as his debts and local elections. His letter of 16 April includes a sketch of the fort.


A Painful History : Symbols Of The Confederacy: A Conversation About The Tension Between Preserving History And Declaring Contemporary Values 1-19-2018, Michael M. Bowden Jan 2018

A Painful History : Symbols Of The Confederacy: A Conversation About The Tension Between Preserving History And Declaring Contemporary Values 1-19-2018, Michael M. Bowden

School of Law Conferences, Lectures & Events

No abstract provided.


Newsroom: A Painful History 1-19-2018, Roger Williams University School Of Law Jan 2018

Newsroom: A Painful History 1-19-2018, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Civil War, 1861-1865 - Lexington, Kentucky (Sc 3173), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jan 2018

Civil War, 1861-1865 - Lexington, Kentucky (Sc 3173), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid and full-text typescript (Click on "Additional Files" below) for Manuscripts Small Collection 3173. Letter, 4 October 1863, from “Albert” to his wife Nellie. From Lexington, Kentucky, he discusses arrangements for her forthcoming visit, describes a painful inflammation affecting his face, and tells her of his military accommodations. He also notes the “howl” of a band in camp expected to play at guard mountings and dress parades.


Williams, Samuel J., D. 1864 (Sc 3167), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jan 2018

Williams, Samuel J., D. 1864 (Sc 3167), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid and full-text typescript (Click on "Additional Files" below) for Manuscripts Small Collection 3167. Letter, 31 October 1861, of Samuel J. Williams, 33rd Indiana Infantry, to “friend Lorinda.” From Camp Calvert in Laurel County, Kentucky, he writes of illness among the soldiers and of preparing the camp’s defenses. He also writes of a nervous sentry’s mistaking a tree stump for an intruder, two orders to prepare for battle, and the capture of two Confederates. The letterhead includes an engraving of a flag-bearing woman and the slogan “Onward to Victory!”


Frazier, William?, D. 1863 (Sc 3168), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jan 2018

Frazier, William?, D. 1863 (Sc 3168), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid and full-text typescript (Click on "Additional Files" below) for Manuscripts Small Collection 3168. Unsigned letter, 31 January 1862, thought to be from William Frazier of the 33rd Indiana Infantry, to a female friend. Writing from Camp Henderson, Kentucky, he sympathizes with her inability to take time from her studies to correspond. He also refers to the weather and his duties as a cook, and mourns the recent deaths of two members of his company.


Hill, John W., 1834-1922 (Sc 3165), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Dec 2017

Hill, John W., 1834-1922 (Sc 3165), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3165. Compilation of military service and pension records of John W. Hill, Warren County, Kentucky. Includes chronologies of Hill’s Civil War service, 1864-1865, and of his disability pension application and subsequent requests for increases, 1888-1922.

Also includes images of Hill, his wife, and selected

documents filed in support of his application.


John E. Davis (William H. Norman) -- A Galvanized Yankee In Utah, Kenneth L. Alford Ph.D. Dec 2017

John E. Davis (William H. Norman) -- A Galvanized Yankee In Utah, Kenneth L. Alford Ph.D.

All Faculty Publications

An interesting and intriguing story about William H. Norman, who served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War as an infantry rifleman from Georgia, was captured by Union troops in December 1864 outside of Nashville, Tennessee, and was then incarcerated as a prisoner-of-war in Camp Douglas, Illinois. As a Confederate prisoner, the federal government gave him the option of remaining in the camp or renouncing his Confederate loyalty and enlisting in the Union Army. Like thousands of his fellow prisoners, he chose the second option and became a "galvanized Yankee." A few months later (after the end of ...


Honor And Compromise, And Getting History Right, Allen C. Guelzo Nov 2017

Honor And Compromise, And Getting History Right, Allen C. Guelzo

Civil War Era Studies Faculty Publications

White House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly does not have a Ph.D. in history, although he does have two master’s degrees, in Strategic Studies (from the National Defense University) and in National Security Affairs from the Georgetown School of Foreign Service. So perhaps it was simply that he believed what he said about the Civil War this past Monday on Laura Ingraham’s new Fox News ‘Ingraham Angle’ was so innocuous that he could also believe that it wouldn’t even become a blip on anyone’s radar screen. (excerpt)


Faust, Burton Sherwood, 1898-1967 (Mss 620), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Nov 2017

Faust, Burton Sherwood, 1898-1967 (Mss 620), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 620. Correspondence, research notes, drafts, photographs, reference works and bibliographic material of Burton S. Faust relating to his studies of the chemical, historical and cultural aspects of saltpetre and of spelean saltpetre mining in the United States.


Forggett, Essie (Fa 1104), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Oct 2017

Forggett, Essie (Fa 1104), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

FA Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Folklife Archives Project 1104. Student paper titled “Slavery in Green County” in which Essie Forggett details the history of the settlement of Green County and its eventual dependence upon slave labor. Forggett also includes stories of slave auctions, punishments, attempted escapes, and religious practices of slaves throughout the region. Paper is based on information collected by Forggett from county clerk records and in-person interviews with slave descendants.


The Duration Of Sub-Saharan African Civil Armed Conflict Episodes, Christian Ilunga-Matthiesen Oct 2017

The Duration Of Sub-Saharan African Civil Armed Conflict Episodes, Christian Ilunga-Matthiesen

The Eastern Illinois University Political Science Review

The socio-economic question which this study intends to answer is one of global relevance. For quite some time now, civil wars on the African continent have been a major source of economic and social destruction resulting in excessive human suffering. The primary objective of this study will constitute the analysis of 32 armed conflict episodes across 17 countries between 1990 and 2014 throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Armed conflicts will be defined as the following: “a contested incompatibility that concerns government and/or territory where the use of armed force between two parties, of which at least one is the government of ...


Hebron, John L., 1842-1914 (Sc 3154), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Oct 2017

Hebron, John L., 1842-1914 (Sc 3154), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid and full-text typescript of letter (Click on "Additional Files" below) for Manuscripts Small Collection 3154. Letter, 26 October 1861, to his mother from John L. Hebron, serving with the 2nd Ohio Infantry at Camp Leslie Combs, West Liberty, Kentucky. He describes a recent engagement with Confederate troops, reports on the killed, wounded and local conditions in the aftermath, and criticizes Confederate battle skills. Expecting to spend the winter at Camp Dennison, Ohio, he expresses satisfaction with his warm clothing but complains of the lack of overcoats.


The Rhetoric Of The Civil War: Literary Devices Of The North And South, Kelsey Williams Oct 2017

The Rhetoric Of The Civil War: Literary Devices Of The North And South, Kelsey Williams

Senior Honors Theses

While both Northern and Southern antebellum writers employed religious imagery for their persuasive purposes, their specific rhetoric differed: Timrod pictured the South romantically, as the revival of Camelot even after the Confederacy’s death; Stowe, heavily influenced by her personal background, enacted emotion accompanied by an appeal to ethics in her fictional apologetic for the end of slavery in Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Although history handed both authors the opportunity to affect the nation’s trajectory, only Stowe achieved this feat, and she owes her triumph over Timrod, the victory of the North over the South, to her emotional rhetoric ...


Messer, George, 1833-1863 (Sc 3138), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Sep 2017

Messer, George, 1833-1863 (Sc 3138), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3138. Letters, 16 December 1862, 13 February 1863 and 6-7 June 1863, of George Messer to his wife Lottie in DeWitt County, Illinois, written while camped near Woodsonville in Hart County, Kentucky and at Camp Hobson, Glasgow, Kentucky. He describes his quarters (his “shebang”), a fire in Woodsonville that burned two hospitals, the remnants of a nearby battlefield, local troop movements, illness, and his finances. He also writes of contributing money to send a soldier’s remains home, and comments on his officers and on domestic matters.


Gordon, George W., 1802?-1862 (Sc 3144), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Sep 2017

Gordon, George W., 1802?-1862 (Sc 3144), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3144. Letter, 26 December 1861, of Captain George W. Gordon to his children. From Camp Bradley at Clarksville, Tennessee, he writes of his enlistment and command of a company in the 48th Tennessee. Mourning the “unnatural war” that is “desolating the Country,” he remarks on the large numbers of troops massing in Kentucky and the expectation of a “bloody conflict.” His pessimistic letter concludes that men may look only to God for mercy.


Buckner, Simon Bolivar, 1823-1914 (Sc 3143), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Sep 2017

Buckner, Simon Bolivar, 1823-1914 (Sc 3143), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3143. Letter, 7 September 1907, of Simon Bolivar Buckner to John H. Weller, former commander of the Orphan Brigade. He suggests that at a forthcoming reunion, the Brigade recommend “the acquiring and improvement” of the birthplace of Jefferson Davis, and notes that an option has already been secured on part of the site. (The Davis Memorial Home movement was subsequently inaugurated at the reunion.)


In Gettysburg, The Confederacy Won, Scott Hancock Aug 2017

In Gettysburg, The Confederacy Won, Scott Hancock

Africana Studies Faculty Publications

Almost every day, I ride my bicycle past some of the over 1,300 statues and monuments commemorating the Civil War in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, where I live. They are everywhere. None of them are of black people.

The Battle of Gettysburg, fought over three days in July of 1863, is often considered the turning point of a war fought over the fate of slavery in America. Black people ultimately were the reason why over 165,000 soldiers came to this Pennsylvania town in the first place. But on the battlefield, as far as the physical memorials, they disappear. (excerpt)


The Buffalo Soldiers, Kenneth Estes Hall Aug 2017

The Buffalo Soldiers, Kenneth Estes Hall

Kenneth Estes Hall

Excerpt: Despite the great success of the Civil War epic Glory, the story of the black troops during and after the War is not well known. This lack of exposure to popular familiarity is especially true of the Buffalo Soldiers who served on the frontier in the late 19th century, chiefly but not exclusively in the Indian Wars.


Should We Banish Robert E. Lee & His Confederate Friends? Let's Talk., Allen C. Guelzo Aug 2017

Should We Banish Robert E. Lee & His Confederate Friends? Let's Talk., Allen C. Guelzo

Civil War Era Studies Faculty Publications

After 152 years, Robert E. Lee is back in the headlines. But not in any way he could have imagined.

The “Unite the Right” forces descended on Charlottesville, Va., to protest calls for the removal of an equestrian statue of Lee that has been sitting in a city park since 1924. The larger question, however, was about whether the famous Confederate general was also a symbol of white supremacy.

The same issues were in play in May when a statue of Lee was removed from Lee Circle in New Orleans. There are also more than two dozen streets and schools ...


Civil War In The Delta: Environment, Race, And The 1863 Helena Campaign, George David Schieffler Aug 2017

Civil War In The Delta: Environment, Race, And The 1863 Helena Campaign, George David Schieffler

Theses and Dissertations

“Civil War in the Delta” describes how the American Civil War came to Helena, Arkansas, and its Phillips County environs, and how its people—black and white, male and female, rich and poor, free and enslaved, soldier and civilian—lived that conflict from the spring of 1861 to the summer of 1863, when Union soldiers repelled a Confederate assault on the town. Scholars have been writing Civil War community studies since the 1960s, but few have investigated communities west of the Mississippi River. Historians also have written widely about Arkansas during the war, but there are no comprehensive studies of ...


Will You...? I Will..., And I Do: Re-Envisioning Matrimony In Civil War-Era Literature, Sherry R. Shindelar Aug 2017

Will You...? I Will..., And I Do: Re-Envisioning Matrimony In Civil War-Era Literature, Sherry R. Shindelar

Theses and Dissertations (All)

This dissertation examines the ramifications that the American Civil War had on the decision to marry--including whether or not to marry, whom to marry, and when, and the role and relationship expectations after vows were said--as reflected or imagined in American fiction from the 1860’s and 1870’s. The focus is on how Civil War-related fiction written by women such as Rebecca Harding Davis, Lydia Maria Child, Louisa May Alcott, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Augusta Jane Evans, E.D.E.N. Southworth, and others portrayed the decision to marry. These authors were responding to the upheaval in their society created ...


What If The South Had Won The Civil War? 4 Sci-Fi Scenarios For Hbo's 'Confederate', Allen C. Guelzo Jul 2017

What If The South Had Won The Civil War? 4 Sci-Fi Scenarios For Hbo's 'Confederate', Allen C. Guelzo

Civil War Era Studies Faculty Publications

“What if” has always been the favorite game of Civil War historians. Now, thanks to David Benioff and D.B. Weiss — the team that created HBO’s insanely popular Game of Thrones — it looks as though we’ll get a chance to see that “what if” on screen. Their new project, Confederate, proposes an alternate America in which the secession of the Southern Confederacy in 1861 actually succeeds. It is a place where slavery is legal and pervasive, and where a new civil war is brewing between the divided sections. (excerpt)


Beninger, John, 1850-1922 (Sc 3133), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jul 2017

Beninger, John, 1850-1922 (Sc 3133), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3133. Notebook containing original and copied poetry by John Beninger, a native of Ohio County, Kentucky. Beninger resided in Versailles, Kentucky, for a number of years, and several of the poems refer to people or places in that community. Beninger often mentions the source of his poem’s inspiration and the date he penned it. Mr. Beninger is buried in the McCord Cemetery in Ohio County, Kentucky.


Messer, George, 1833-1863 (Sc 3129), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jul 2017

Messer, George, 1833-1863 (Sc 3129), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid and transcription (click on "Additional Files" below) for Manuscripts Small Collection 3129. Letter, 26 March 1863, of George Messer to his wife Lottie in DeWitt County, Illinois. From Camp Joe Kelly (the name changed, as he notes, to Camp Hobson) near Glasgow, Kentucky, he describes camp life, including the clearing of timber and his duty in the cold and rainy weather. He also praises the hospital facilities and describes a joke played on an officer who returned to camp without a pass. Expecting the war to end soon, he also writes of matters relating to home.


Vance, Edward Richard, 1833-1902 (Mss 612), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jul 2017

Vance, Edward Richard, 1833-1902 (Mss 612), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 612. Correspondence, diaries, scrapbooks, photographs and family papers of Richard Vance, a Warren County, Kentucky native and U.S. Army officer. After his Civil War service, Vance spent his career at several posts in the South and on the frontier until his retirement in 1892.


Cowing, Rufus Billings, 1840-1920 (Sc 3124), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jun 2017

Cowing, Rufus Billings, 1840-1920 (Sc 3124), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3124. Letter, 21 February 1862, of attorney Rufus B. Cowing, New York City, to his mother. He encloses a letter from his brother (not included), who was then serving in the Union Army and would later be killed at the Battle of Chickamauga. Rufus notes his brother’s arrival in Bowling Green, Kentucky after “the enemy had run away.” Believing the war will soon end, he speculates on his brother’s future in business and writes of his own desire to be financially independent.


Loving, Hector Voltaire, 1839-1913 (Sc 3123), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jun 2017

Loving, Hector Voltaire, 1839-1913 (Sc 3123), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid and full-text typescript (click on "Additional Files" below) for Manuscripts Small Collection 3123. Letter, 31 July 1862, of Hector V. Loving, Bowling Green, Kentucky, to Harlan P. Lloyd, Angelica, New York. He tells his former schoolmate of his law study and practice since graduation from New York’s Hamilton College, and particularly describes the uproar in his home town of Bowling Green, Kentucky at the outbreak of the Civil War: secessionist “treason,” the Confederate occupation, and the rebuilding of the city afterward. He also refers to their classmate and law student Daniel Webster Wright as a “violent” secessionist.


"Cracks In The Melting Pot": Native Americans, Military Service And Citizenship, Brittany A. Kelley Jun 2017

"Cracks In The Melting Pot": Native Americans, Military Service And Citizenship, Brittany A. Kelley

Electronic Theses, Projects, and Dissertations

This paper focuses on Native American military service in Euro-American Wars. It analyzes their reasons for fighting and compares those reasons to the reasons of other racial and ethnic groups. This paper explores how certain racial and ethnic groups are marginalized and “otherized” and how they occasionally attempt to assimilate into mainstream society through military service. Irish Americans and African Americans viewed the Civil War in this way, while Native Americans hoped they would be able to improve their individual situations. Native Americans fought for purposes of assimilation and citizenship in World War I, and while they were technically granted ...