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Civil War

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Articles 1 - 30 of 1543

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

The Colfax Massacre: A Culmination Of Political And Racial Disparity, Lian F. Mitzian Dec 2018

The Colfax Massacre: A Culmination Of Political And Racial Disparity, Lian F. Mitzian

Line by Line: A Journal of Beginning Student Writing

I wrote this paper for the interdisciplinary humanities course The Development of Western Culture in a Global Context. My writing process consisted of first examining various primary and secondary sources on Southern Reconstruction and the Colfax Massacre. This gave me an understanding of how historians have come to understand the event throughout time. In my research, I found two categories of interpretations, which I then used to organize my ideas and develop my own understanding of the implications of the event.


Hobson, William Edward, 1844-1909 - Relating To (Sc 3283), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Oct 2018

Hobson, William Edward, 1844-1909 - Relating To (Sc 3283), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3283. Certificate of Honorable Discharge, 23 January 1899, issued to William E. Hobson, Bowling Green, Kentucky, by Post No. 55, Grand Army of the Republic, Department of Kentucky. The certificate includes data about Hobson’s service and the date he joined the Post.


Row, Jacob D., 1835-1910 (Sc 3281), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Oct 2018

Row, Jacob D., 1835-1910 (Sc 3281), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3281. Letter, 4 December 1864, of Jacob D. Row, 17th Indiana Infantry, to his wife Hannah in Lakeville, Indiana. Writing from Louisville, Kentucky, he tells of improving from an illness but complains of weakness and tremors. He advises her to “sell our corn for what you can get” prior to a trip to Ohio, as he will not be coming home on furlough.


Ligon, Lucy Ann (Parker) Robbins, 1833-1891 - Letters To (Sc 3278), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Oct 2018

Ligon, Lucy Ann (Parker) Robbins, 1833-1891 - Letters To (Sc 3278), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3278. Letters to Lucy Ann Robbins Ligon, the daughter of Fulton County, Kentucky judge Josiah Parker and his wife Lucy A. Parker, written while she lived in Crittenden County, Arkansas with her late husband’s brother, and in Hickman, Kentucky after her remarriage. Lucy’s parents relay news of her siblings and of pre-Civil War Hickman, and at the outbreak of war dramatically describe the division of loyalties, the townspeople’s fear and uncertainty as invasion threatens from the North, the enlistment of local men, two destructive fires, economic conditions, the suspension of ...


Ballew, William A., 1842-1915 (Sc 3277), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Oct 2018

Ballew, William A., 1842-1915 (Sc 3277), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3277. Letter, 12 November 1864, from William A. Ballew to Thomas Hopkins, Clinton County, Kentucky. Writing from Spring Hill, Tennessee, where he is serving with the 12th Kentucky Infantry, Ballew notes his regiment’s support of presidential candidate George B. McClellan (“little mack”). Although they were not yet enfranchised, he cites a mock election held by African Americans in Nashville as evidence for President Abraham Lincoln’s likely reelection. He notes the good health of his fellow soldiers, including Hopkins’ two sons, Lewis and Shelby.


Fry, Samuel Van Buren, 1840-1903 (Sc 3276), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Oct 2018

Fry, Samuel Van Buren, 1840-1903 (Sc 3276), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3276. Letter, 31 July 1864, of Samuel V. Fry, 16th Kentucky Infantry, to Ruth Jane Sapp. From Dalton, Georgia, he writes of engaging Confederate forces near Atlanta in a "big fight every day” and hopes to see her if he survives the war. He urges her not to “give me up for lost and take some other gentle man in my place.”


Hopkins, Lewis Franklin, 1841-1921 (Sc 3275), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Oct 2018

Hopkins, Lewis Franklin, 1841-1921 (Sc 3275), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3275. Letter, 18 April 1864, to his parents in Clinton County, Kentucky, from Lewis F. Hopkins, 12th Kentucky Infantry. Encamped at Burnside’s Point, Kentucky, he reports on the construction of fortifications and the soldiers’ demand for horses. He finds the food plentiful, but is unhappy that civilians in the vicinity who have come from Tennessee and are likely to have Confederate sympathies are drawing from the camp commissary.


Review, Surveillance And Spies In The Civil War: Exposing Confederate Conspiracies In America’S Heartland, By Stephen E. Towne, Evan Rothera Sep 2018

Review, Surveillance And Spies In The Civil War: Exposing Confederate Conspiracies In America’S Heartland, By Stephen E. Towne, Evan Rothera

Secrecy and Society

Review of Stephen E. Towne's Surveillance and Spies in the Civil War: Exposing Confederate Conspiracies in America’s Heartland.


Helm Family Papers (Mss 633), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Sep 2018

Helm Family Papers (Mss 633), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscript Collection 633. Correspondence, business papers, deeds, and miscellaneous records of the Helm family of Butler County, Kentucky, and related families.


Chapin, Margaret (Terwillinger) (Sc 3239), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jul 2018

Chapin, Margaret (Terwillinger) (Sc 3239), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection SC 3239. Letter, dated November 16, 1862, by Margaret T. Chapin, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, to her husband, David S. Chapin, at Camp Despair in Kentucky. Margaret copies a section of a song from a hymnbook. David S. Chapin writes back to Margaret, on the other side of the paper, dated December 22, 1862, from Camp Despair. He writes that Margaret would receive his pension if he dies. He tells her that she would earn $96 a year, or $11 a month. He reminds her to send stamps in her next letter, he ...


Morgan, William Montrose, 1842-1926 (Sc 3231), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jul 2018

Morgan, William Montrose, 1842-1926 (Sc 3231), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3231. Letter, February 2, 1862, of William Montrose Morgan to his parents and sisters, of Wisconsin. From Camp Wood, Kentucky, he writes of the rainy and snowy weather; the number of soldiers sick in company regiments; he describes his regiment and his brigade commander as being the best in the division. He comments about the regiment being on guard duty and held in reserve to protect a bridge and ferry on Green River. The letter describes that there are 20,000 men in his regiment under General Negley; Union materials were being transported ...


Kibbee, Amos Watson, 1828-1915 (Sc 3230), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jul 2018

Kibbee, Amos Watson, 1828-1915 (Sc 3230), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3230. Letter, 26 January 1862, of Amos Watson Kibbee to his cousin, Hattie Tuttle, of Painesville, Ohio. From Camp Barker in Cairo, Illinois, he writes about camp life and rumors of possible cavalry soldiers being discharged and his experiences of late-night scouting duties. He also describes being in an advance guard with other soldiers, taking the town of Blandville, Kentucky, and arresting suspicious civilians. He writes about guarding a prisoner of war, and his change of religious views. Includes an Illinois Union envelope.


Our Country: Northern Evangelicals And The Union During The Civil War Era [Bibliography], Grant Brodrecht Jun 2018

Our Country: Northern Evangelicals And The Union During The Civil War Era [Bibliography], Grant Brodrecht

History

On March 4, 1865, the day Abraham Lincoln delivered his second inaugural address, Reverend Doctor George Peck put the finishing touches on a collection of his sermons that he intended to send to the president. Although the politically moderate Peck had long opposed slavery, he, along with many other northern evangelicals, was not an abolitionist. During the Civil War he had come to support emancipation, but, like Lincoln, the conflict remained first and foremost about preserving the Union. Believing their devotion to the Union was an act of faithfulness to God first and the Founding Fathers second, Our Country explores ...


Civil War, 1861-1865 - Reenactors (Sc 3228), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jun 2018

Civil War, 1861-1865 - Reenactors (Sc 3228), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3228. “26th Kentucky Volunteers: To Save the Union,” a handbook for a company of Civil War reenactors based in Owensboro, Kentucky. Includes a history of the 26th Kentucky Volunteers and a guide to aspects of reenacting including uniforms, equipment, camp setup and rules of conduct.


Hebron, John L., 1842-1914 (Sc 3226), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jun 2018

Hebron, John L., 1842-1914 (Sc 3226), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3226. Letter, 31 January 1862, of John Hebron to his mother, written from Camp Jefferson, Bacon Creek, Hart County, Kentucky. He thanks her for a food package, comments on his health and, in response to her question, replies that he knows of no one being confined for failing to keep his gun clean.


Warren, Kaye (Fa 1150), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives May 2018

Warren, Kaye (Fa 1150), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

FA Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Folklife Archives Project 1150. Student folk studies project titled “From Slavery to Freedom for the Negro Race in Logan County [Kentucky]” which includes survey sheets with a brief description of African American life in Logan County, Kentucky. Sheets may include interviews, written records, photographs, informant’s name, age, and address.


The Soldiers & Sailors Monument: A County-Wide Civil War Memorial, Matthew R. Ballard May 2018

The Soldiers & Sailors Monument: A County-Wide Civil War Memorial, Matthew R. Ballard

Pioneer Record

The Soldiers and Sailors Monument is perhaps one of the most impressive and beautiful war memorials in our area, but the true significance of the shrine is often overshadowed by the novelty and "thrill of the climb" up the winding steel staircase. In the face of grave sacrifice, a community struggled to memorialize the hundreds of young men, sons, brothers, and fathers, who left the security of home for ideals far greater than themselves.


The Relationship Between The Methodist Church, Slavery And Politics, 1784-1844, Brian D. Lawrence May 2018

The Relationship Between The Methodist Church, Slavery And Politics, 1784-1844, Brian D. Lawrence

Theses and Dissertations

The Methodist church split in 1844 was a cumulative result of decades of regional instability within the governing structure of the church. Although John Wesley had a strict anti-slavery belief as the leader of the movement in Great Britain, the Methodist church in America faced a distinctively different dilemma. Slavery proved to be a lasting institution that posed problems for Methodism in the United States and in the larger political context. The issue of slavery plagued Methodism from almost its inception, but the church functioned well although conflicts remained below the surface. William Capers, James Osgood Andrew, and Freeborn Garrettson ...


Webster, Mrs. William - Letter To (Sc 3221), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives May 2018

Webster, Mrs. William - Letter To (Sc 3221), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3221. Letter written by “Ann” to her sister, Mrs. William Webster in Lorain County, Ohio, apparently after leaving home to join her husband Ed, stationed at a garrison in Columbus, Kentucky. Ann writes of her recent illness and the frequency of sickness in women coming from the North; of Ed’s military duties; of a “boy” back home; and of her lack of fear when alarms are raised at the garrison. In an apparent reference to Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest, she doubts that he will “gobble” them up. Ed adds a postscript ...


Miller, George W., B. 1843? (Sc 3220), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives May 2018

Miller, George W., B. 1843? (Sc 3220), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 3220. Letter, 19 January 1863, of George W. Miller to his sister. In camp at Bowling Green, Kentucky, the unhappy soldier writes of the threat of death from battle and disease, of “tyrannical” officers, and of a debt owed to him at home. He is angered to learn that an uncle in Fostoria, Ohio is a secessionist. He also mentions his brother Jacob’s engagement in a “big fight” lasting five days.


A Dagger Through The Heartland: The Louisville & Nashville Railroad In The Civil War, Gared N. Dalton May 2018

A Dagger Through The Heartland: The Louisville & Nashville Railroad In The Civil War, Gared N. Dalton

The Gettysburg College Journal of the Civil War Era

The Civil War was a defining moment in American history. What began as a sectional debate over states’ rights transformed itself into a bloody odyssey that would alter the national character itself. Within the wide scope of this conflict, scholars have sought to answer the multifaceted question of how the Union triumphed, often citing the proficient management of the railways as a key contribution to victory. Within this logistical network of rails, the Louisville & Nashville Railroad served as a vital mode of transportation for supplies and troop mobility through the heartland states of Kentucky and Tennessee. The Union exploited this ...


Rewriting History: A Study Of How The History Of The Civil War Has Changed In Textbooks From 1876 To 2014, Skyler A. Campbell May 2018

Rewriting History: A Study Of How The History Of The Civil War Has Changed In Textbooks From 1876 To 2014, Skyler A. Campbell

The Gettysburg College Journal of the Civil War Era

History textbooks provide an interesting perspective into the views and attitudes of their respective time period. The way textbooks portray certain events and groups of people has a profound impact on the way children learn to view those groups and events. That impact then has the potential to trickle down to future generations, fabricating a historical narrative that sometimes avoids telling the whole truth, or uses selective wording to sway opinions on certain topics. This paper analyzes the changes seen in how the Civil War is written about in twelve textbooks dated from 1876 to 2014. Notable topics of discussion ...


Condemning Colonization: Abraham Lincoln’S Rejected Proposal For A Central American Colony, Matthew Harris May 2018

Condemning Colonization: Abraham Lincoln’S Rejected Proposal For A Central American Colony, Matthew Harris

The Gettysburg College Journal of the Civil War Era

This article focuses on a proposal by Abraham Lincoln to settle freed African Americans in Central American countries. The backlash from several countries reveals that other countries besides the warring United States were also struggling with reconciling racial issues. This also reveals how interwoven racial issues were with political crises during the Civil War because it not only effected domestic policies but also international relations.


After Andersonville: Survivors, Memory And The Bloody Shirt, Kevin S. Nicholson May 2018

After Andersonville: Survivors, Memory And The Bloody Shirt, Kevin S. Nicholson

The Gettysburg College Journal of the Civil War Era

This article details the experiences of survivors of the Andersonville prison camp after the Civil War. Feeling marginalized by the public after returning to the North, prisoners of war worked to demonstrate that their experiences were exceptional enough to merit the same kind of respect and adoration given to other war veterans. In particular survivors utilized the strategy of "waving the bloody shirt," describing purported Confederate atrocities at the camp to a Northern audience looking for figures to blame for the horrors of war. Through prison narratives, veteran organizations, the erection of memorials, and reunions years later, Andersonville survivors worked ...


Albion Native Was Present At Capture Of John Wilkes Booth, Matthew R. Ballard May 2018

Albion Native Was Present At Capture Of John Wilkes Booth, Matthew R. Ballard

Pioneer Record

Just as many men claimed they were present at the Battle of Gettysburg when they were not, some members of the 16th New York Cavalry claimed to have participated in the capture of John Wilkes Booth. William Collins of Albion, a veteran of the 16th New York Cavalry, claimed that he was present when Boston Corbett shot Booth at the Garrett Farm despite a lack of evidence to support his participation.


"Did You Ever Hear Of A Man Having A Child?": An Examination Of The Risk And Benefits Of Being An African American Female Soldier During America's Civil War, Kirsten Chaney May 2018

"Did You Ever Hear Of A Man Having A Child?": An Examination Of The Risk And Benefits Of Being An African American Female Soldier During America's Civil War, Kirsten Chaney

Graduate Theses

The purpose of this paper is to explore the social, economic, and political benefits for African American females who cross-dressed to join both the Confederate and Union Armies during the American Civil War. The benefits gained by the African American women who disguised themselves as males improved their overall quality of life when compared to other African American women of their era. The improved quality of life for these disguised women was made available through the increased number of options granted to African American males in the social, economic, and political spheres that were denied to African American women. The ...


Millville Cemetery Monument Stands As A Remarkable Local Landmark, Matthew R. Ballard Apr 2018

Millville Cemetery Monument Stands As A Remarkable Local Landmark, Matthew R. Ballard

Pioneer Record

The headstone of Asa C. Hill, buried at Millville Cemetery in Shelby, maybe the only local cemetery marker crafted in the likeness of the deceased. A member of the 28th New York Infantry during the Civil War, Hill lost his leg during the Battle of Cedar Mountain, an injury that would have a lasting impact on his life.


Messer, George, 1833-1863 (Sc 3211), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Apr 2018

Messer, George, 1833-1863 (Sc 3211), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid and full text transcription (Click on "Additional Files" below) for Manuscripts Small Collection 3211. Letters, 6 January-31 May 1863, of George Messer to his wife Lottie in DeWitt County, Illinois, while encamped in Hart County, Kentucky and at Camp Hobson, Glasgow, Kentucky. He writes of illness and death among his comrades, troop strength, wage payments, food, and his commanding officers. Weary of a soldier’s life and anxious for the South’s total defeat, he criticizes conscription laws that allow exemption on payment of a fee, and accuses politicians and “Eastern men” of prolonging the war. He notes ...


Irish Journalists And Journalism During The American Civil War, Michael Foley Apr 2018

Irish Journalists And Journalism During The American Civil War, Michael Foley

Conference Papers

Irish journalists played a significant role in the lead up to the US Civil War in ensuring the Irish population supported the Union and volunteered for the army.


“Books Like This Cannot Be Useless”: The Political And Popular Reception Of Victor Hugo’S Les Misérables In Civil War America, Emily S. Turner Apr 2018

“Books Like This Cannot Be Useless”: The Political And Popular Reception Of Victor Hugo’S Les Misérables In Civil War America, Emily S. Turner

Senior Theses and Projects

Senior thesis completed at Trinity College for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in English.