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1990

Journal

John Finnis

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

A Critical Legal Studies Perspective, Mark Tushnet Jan 1990

A Critical Legal Studies Perspective, Mark Tushnet

Cleveland State Law Review

In this comment I want to address two points suggested by Professor Finnis's essay "Natural Law and Legal Reasoning." I say "suggested by" deliberately, for I do not want to attribute the points in their full force to him, although I believe that his essay lends itself to a reading in which those points would be given their full force. The points deal with the question of "easy questions" and what Professor Finnis calls the "sufficient and necessarily artificial clarity and definiteness" that yields answers to such questions, and with the way in which legal professionals are likely to ...


Whose Nature - Practical Reason And Patriarchy, Lynne Henderson Jan 1990

Whose Nature - Practical Reason And Patriarchy, Lynne Henderson

Cleveland State Law Review

My comments on John Finnis's Natural Law and Legal Reasoning grow out my concern about the relationship of law to authoritarianism. In this comment, I do not intend to go deeply into the relationship of law to authoritarianism but rather to sketch out the background of the argument. It seems to me that authoritarianism, properly understood, is of great relevance to a symposium on jurisprudence and legal reasoning, because at a minimum, authoritarianism overlaps with legality's ethic of rule-following and obedience to authority. Authoritarian attitudes about authority and morality also are relevant to the jurisprudential concern with the ...


Justification In The Killing Of An Innocent Person, John Makdisi Jan 1990

Justification In The Killing Of An Innocent Person, John Makdisi

Cleveland State Law Review

It is appropriate to call Finnis' approach to life as an incommensurable basic human good a natural law approach. It suggests that there is more to life than just an accumulation of wealth, happiness, value, etc. There is something about life that we cannot value, that we cannot measure, that we cannot fathom, that is mysterious. While contract and even some tort law are readily adaptable to arguments of economic efficiency, there are areas where such arguments do not belong. Specifically, where the end result cannot be measured because the values at stake are incommensurable, there may be no best ...


Natural Law Without Metaphysics: The Case Of John Finnis, Jeremy Shearmur Jan 1990

Natural Law Without Metaphysics: The Case Of John Finnis, Jeremy Shearmur

Cleveland State Law Review

Finnis, in Natural Law and Natural Right, sidesteps certain problems by taking a largely internalist view of natural law. First, for Finnis there is no problem of moving from facts to values, because within his starting-point-the "internal" reflective analysis of action-values are already there to be found. Second, Finnis suggests that what is today often cited as "the" statement of a fact/value problem, Hume's analysis, is in fact better understood as directed towards a different problem: one of the relation between truth and motivation. Here Finnis also offers a solution, suggesting that "one is motivated according to one ...