Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Arts and Humanities Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

‘A’ That’S Past Forget – Forgie’: National Drama And The Construction Of Scottish National Identity On The Nineteenth-Century Stage, Paula Sledzinska Dec 2018

‘A’ That’S Past Forget – Forgie’: National Drama And The Construction Of Scottish National Identity On The Nineteenth-Century Stage, Paula Sledzinska

Studies in Scottish Literature

Focused on dramatic adaptations of Walter Scott’s Rob Roy and Waverley for the Theatre Royal, Edinburgh, by Isaac Pocock and John W. Calcraft, this essay explores "how the conflicted Lowland and Highland traditions became incorporated into the new image of the nation," offering "a theatrical reflection of the dynamic process of identity building in the nineteenth-century Scotland."


Authority And The Narrative Voice In Stevenson's Weir Of Hermiston, Gillian Hughes Nov 2016

Authority And The Narrative Voice In Stevenson's Weir Of Hermiston, Gillian Hughes

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses and analyzes Robert Louis Stevenson's use of the narrator's voice in his short, unfinished novel Weir of Hermiston, comparing his narrative strategies with those of Walter Scott, George Moore, George Douglas Brown, D.H. Lawrence, and Lewis Grassic Gibbon, concluding that "Stevenson’s fictions are experimental works," that "respond ingeniously to the dominant and quasi-official formulae and assumptions of writers of classic Victorian novels, and in turn establish an important model from which subsequent British novelists ... could learn."


Authorial Disguise And Intertextuality: Scott’S The Lay Of The Last Minstrel, Coleridge, And Keats, Beth Lau Nov 2014

Authorial Disguise And Intertextuality: Scott’S The Lay Of The Last Minstrel, Coleridge, And Keats, Beth Lau

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses Walter Scott's first published poem The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), exploring the relation between Scott's use of disguise and distancing devices with his use of anonymity in his fiction, and explores the intertextual relationships between his poem and other poems of the romantic era.


Textual Messages: Scholarly Editions And Their Role In Literary Criticism, Alison Lumsden Aug 2013

Textual Messages: Scholarly Editions And Their Role In Literary Criticism, Alison Lumsden

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the editing of Scottish literary texts, specifically recent editions of Walter Scott and James Hogg, and argues that textual investigation is not simply technical and preliminary but an integral part of literary criticism.


Deficiencies: Mental Disability And The Imagination In Scott's Waverley Novels, Colin Carman Aug 2013

Deficiencies: Mental Disability And The Imagination In Scott's Waverley Novels, Colin Carman

Studies in Scottish Literature

Argues that Walter Scott's novels, especially Waverley and The Heart of Midlothian, represent a shift in Anglo-scottish attitudes towards the mentally ill, and that mental disability, operating in Scott's novels under the guises of idiocy and insanity, was integral to Scott’s articulations of the romantic imagination.


Books Received, John T. Knox, Patrick G. Scott Aug 2013

Books Received, John T. Knox, Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Publication details and short descriptions of over thirty recently-published books in Scottish literature and related fields.


The Ssl Symposium On Editing: A Commentary, Ian Duncan Aug 2013

The Ssl Symposium On Editing: A Commentary, Ian Duncan

Studies in Scottish Literature

Reviews and comments on the preceding essays in the SSL Symposium on Editing Scottish Literary Texts, setting them in the wider context of critical discussion, responding to some of the earlier comments comparing the recent collected editions of Walter Scott and James Hogg, and arguing that the "authentically democratic" work of making a fuller range of Scottish literary texts available moves critical discussion forward from the "tedious zero-sum game" of debating a static canon.


Sir Walter Scott And John Clare: An Unpublished Letter, Ian D. Kane Aug 2013

Sir Walter Scott And John Clare: An Unpublished Letter, Ian D. Kane

Studies in Scottish Literature

Reports an autograph letter written by Walter Scott, now in the G. Ross Roy Collection at the University of South Carolina, dated May 31, 1820, and sent to Captain Markham Shirwill, responding to Shirwill's request that Scott foster Clare's writing career; along with a transcription and illustration of the letter, the note discusses what was previously known about this incident and its context based on the letters of Clare.


Writer, Reader, And Rhetoric In John Gibson Lockhart's Memoirs Of The Life Of Sir Walter Scott, Bart., Gerald P. Mulderig Jan 2012

Writer, Reader, And Rhetoric In John Gibson Lockhart's Memoirs Of The Life Of Sir Walter Scott, Bart., Gerald P. Mulderig

Studies in Scottish Literature

No abstract provided.


"A Very Curious Emptiness": Walter Scott And The Twentieth-Century Scottish Renaissance Movement, Margery Palmer Mcculloch Jan 2007

"A Very Curious Emptiness": Walter Scott And The Twentieth-Century Scottish Renaissance Movement, Margery Palmer Mcculloch

Studies in Scottish Literature

No abstract provided.


"Hab Nab At A Venture": Scott On The Creative Process, David Hewitt Jan 2007

"Hab Nab At A Venture": Scott On The Creative Process, David Hewitt

Studies in Scottish Literature

No abstract provided.


Hogg, Byron, Scott, And John Murray Of Albemarle Street, Douglas S. Mack Jan 2007

Hogg, Byron, Scott, And John Murray Of Albemarle Street, Douglas S. Mack

Studies in Scottish Literature

No abstract provided.