Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Arts and Humanities Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Journal

Studies in Scottish Literature

Scottish women's writing

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Venturing A Little Further: Margaret Elphinstone, The Sea Road (2000), Matthew Wickman Dec 2017

Venturing A Little Further: Margaret Elphinstone, The Sea Road (2000), Matthew Wickman

Studies in Scottish Literature

Proposes that Margaret Elphinstone’s historical novel about Gudrid of Iceland, an eleventh-century female explorer of Greenland and North America, is "a novel for many seasons: the eleventh century, the early and late twentieth, and far into the twenty-first," judging it "one of the great Scottish novels about the unknown," and "perhaps the nation’s greatest contribution to the modern zeitgeist."


Nan Shepherd, The Quarry Wood (1928), Carole Jones Dec 2017

Nan Shepherd, The Quarry Wood (1928), Carole Jones

Studies in Scottish Literature

Recommends Shepherd's novel about an independent woman in north-east Scotland as "vivid in delineating its female central character, its local language, and what is undoubtedly a radical engagement with sexual politics," that "examines closely issues of sexual identity and gender relations, and ... comes to its own thoughtful conclusions on women's place in the world."


Immigrant Communities, Cultural Conflicts, And Intermarriage In Ann Marie Di Mambro's Tally's Blood, Ian Brown Dec 2017

Immigrant Communities, Cultural Conflicts, And Intermarriage In Ann Marie Di Mambro's Tally's Blood, Ian Brown

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the stage history, structure and themes of Anne Marie Di Mambro’s play Tally’s Blood (1990), especially in terms of the cultural stresses on Italian immigrant families in Scotland in the 1930s and the impact on them of the Second World War.


Willa Muir, Imagined Corners (1931), Timothy C. Baker Dec 2017

Willa Muir, Imagined Corners (1931), Timothy C. Baker

Studies in Scottish Literature

Recommends Muir's novel (which came in 30th in the BBC poll), set in a small Scottish town and concerned with "'the ideology of Scotland,' and questions of class, religion, sexuality, politics, and education," as "indisputably a great novel, perhaps equalled in British fiction only by To the Lighthouse, and utterly unique in the Scottish canon,"