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‘Such Editorial Liberties’: Scott And The Textual Afterlives Of Thomas The Rhymer, David Selfe Dec 2018

‘Such Editorial Liberties’: Scott And The Textual Afterlives Of Thomas The Rhymer, David Selfe

Studies in Scottish Literature

This essay discusses from his Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border (1802 etc) Walter Scott's version of the ballad "Thomas the Rhymer" (or "True Thomas") tracing the ballad's history within the social context of its reception, and then comparing Scott’s version with the orally-transmitted version "Thomas Rhymer and the Queen of Elfland",written down by Anna Gordon Brown in 1800, for differences both in wording and in punctuation choices as the “apologetic apostrophe,” to suggest how such textual traces show the changing relationship between textual form and textual function. [essay still in final proof stage]


Claimed By The Stage: Popular Dramatization And The Legacy Of The Lady Of The Lake, Mary Nestor Dec 2018

Claimed By The Stage: Popular Dramatization And The Legacy Of The Lady Of The Lake, Mary Nestor

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses three stage adaptations of Scott's poem The Lady of the Lake, by Thomas Dibdin for the Surrey Theatre, London, John Edmund Eyre, for the Theatre Royal, Edinburgh, and Thomas Morton for Covent Garden, arguing that these popular melodramas shaped popular perception of how Scott's poem engaged the Highland landscape.

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'Like Pushkin, I': Hugh Macdiarmid And Russia, Patrick Crotty Dec 2018

'Like Pushkin, I': Hugh Macdiarmid And Russia, Patrick Crotty

Studies in Scottish Literature

A detailed discussion of the poetic development of the Scottish poet Hugh MacDiamid (1892-1978), drawing on research for the forthcoming Complete Collected Poems of Hugh MacDiarmid to chart the changing ways in which he encountered, read, and responded to Russian writing, philosophy and culture in different phases of his career.


Translations Of Robert Burns In The Russian Book Market: The Old And The New, Natalia Kaloh Vid Dec 2018

Translations Of Robert Burns In The Russian Book Market: The Old And The New, Natalia Kaloh Vid

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the influence of Samuil Marshak's long-dominant Russian translations of Robert Burns's poems and the more recent anthologies and translations that "broke the Marshak monopoly," and briefly examines why, in publishing terms, the Marshak translations are still the most widely available.


An Ssl Research Symposium: Introduction: New Developments In Robert Burns Bibliography, Gerard Carruthers Dec 2017

An Ssl Research Symposium: Introduction: New Developments In Robert Burns Bibliography, Gerard Carruthers

Studies in Scottish Literature

Introduces four talks given at the National Library of Scotland on March 16, 2017, at a workshop on New Developments in Robert Burns Bibliography, jointly convened by Robert Betteridge of the National Library and by Prof. Carruthers, as general editor of the AHRC-funded project Editing Robert Burns for the 21st Century, arguing that "every bit as much as literary criticism or textual editing, bibliographical studies need generational renewal."


Towards A New Bibliography Of Robert Burns, Craig Lamont Dec 2017

Towards A New Bibliography Of Robert Burns, Craig Lamont

Studies in Scottish Literature

Introduces and describes the first phase of a new, free on-line resource from the University of Glasgow, A Bibliography of Robert Burns for the 21st Century: 1786-1802, based on fresh examination of multiple copies in several Scottish libraries, as well as in collections in the US and Canada, providing significantly-expanded entries for the early book-publication of Burns's poetry, and so allowing textual editors a more complete record of the textual history of Burns's work.


'Upon The Decaying Kirk': A Footnote To Ane Dialogue, Jamie Reid Baxter Dec 2017

'Upon The Decaying Kirk': A Footnote To Ane Dialogue, Jamie Reid Baxter

Studies in Scottish Literature

Prints a short Scottish verse-fragment from the 1630s, "Upon the Decaying Kirk," and discusses its relation to an earlier, longer workAne Dialogue (1619: see SSL 43:1) and to presbyterian protests in the Edinburgh High Kirk against the introduction of episcopalianism under King Charles I.


The Scotch Bard And 'The Planting Line': New Documents On Burns And Jamaica, Clark Mcginn Dec 2017

The Scotch Bard And 'The Planting Line': New Documents On Burns And Jamaica, Clark Mcginn

Studies in Scottish Literature

Based on newly-identified documents, reexamines Burns's plan in 1786 to emigrate to Jamaica to take a job on a Scottish-owned slave plantation, and the timing and circumstances of his eventual decision to stay in Scotland, concluding that Burns "kept his options open to the last moment," and that the new documents might mean Burns "sought to prosper from chattel slavery," and "only dropped the opportunity because a better offer came along, not because of any moral scruples."


Gavin Douglas's Aeneados: Caxton's English And 'Our Scottis Langage', Jacquelyn Hendricks Dec 2017

Gavin Douglas's Aeneados: Caxton's English And 'Our Scottis Langage', Jacquelyn Hendricks

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the Scots poet Gavin Douglas's translation of Virgil's Aeneid into Scots, and Douglas's treatment of his predecessor William Caxton's translation of Virgil into English, arguing that Douglas associates Caxton's English with a barbaric world of monsters and beasts, in contrast to Scots which is seen as expressing civilized classical values, and that Douglas's translation, by enhancing and showcasing the literary power of Scots for a wider audience, successfully resisted for at least forty years the linguistic standardization initiated by the burgeoning print industry.


Beattie's The Minstrel: A Missing Link In Scottish Poetry, Ian C. Robertson Dec 2017

Beattie's The Minstrel: A Missing Link In Scottish Poetry, Ian C. Robertson

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the Scottish poet James Beattie's poetry, especially his major work The Minstrel, and his shorter poem in Scots, "To Mr Alexander Ross," in terms of his connections, role and influence within the Scottish poetry and culture of the mid- to late 18th century, arguing that without taking into account Beattie's complex relationship to Scottish, and specifically Aberdonian, culture, the development of 18th century Scottish poetry between Ramsay and Burns cannot be adequately understood.


'Not In Egerer'? (Some Of) What We Still Don't Know About Burns Bibliography, Patrick Scott Dec 2017

'Not In Egerer'? (Some Of) What We Still Don't Know About Burns Bibliography, Patrick Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Briefly reviews developments in Burns bibliography since J.W. Egerer's Bibliography of Robert Burns (1964), examines the kinds of material that Egerer aimed to include and exclude, and presents a series of brief case-studies illustrating the desirability of additional research, especially on early publication in non-book formats, for obtaining a fuller picture of Burns's textual history and readership.


Robert Burns In Print At The National Library Of Scotland, Robert Betteridge Dec 2017

Robert Burns In Print At The National Library Of Scotland, Robert Betteridge

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the early Burns editions now in the National Library of Scotland, compares the NLS holdings to those of other major UK research libraries, examines the limited role of the deposit privilege in bring early Burns editions to the Advocates' Library before the founding of the NLS, and provides examples of significant early editions that were subsequently acquired for the library by purchase and donation.


Books Noted And Received, Patrick Scott Dec 2017

Books Noted And Received, Patrick Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Short reviews and brief notices of twenty-one recent books in Scottish literary studies.


Tom Scott As Religious Poet: 'The Paschal Candill' In Context, Richie Mccaffery Dec 2017

Tom Scott As Religious Poet: 'The Paschal Candill' In Context, Richie Mccaffery

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the religious beliefs and writings of the Scottish poet Tom Scott (1918-1995), both as a continuing concern and during a period of explicitly Catholic belief in the 1950, examining in detail his Catholic poem 'The Paschal Candill' in relation to his much more widely-recognized political comments.


Burns And Chapbooks: A Bibliographer's Twilight Zone, Iain Beavan Dec 2017

Burns And Chapbooks: A Bibliographer's Twilight Zone, Iain Beavan

Studies in Scottish Literature

Based on records for 358 chapbooks containing material by Robert Burns, published in Scotland, England and Ireland, between the 1780s and the 1880s, provides statistical information on their distribution by date and place of publication, and discusses some of the special research issues raised by this publication format, especially relating to the attribution (and misattribution) of authorship.


Robert Burns's Hand In 'Ay Waukin, O': The Roy Manuscript And William Tytler's Dissertation (1779), Patrick G. Scott May 2017

Robert Burns's Hand In 'Ay Waukin, O': The Roy Manuscript And William Tytler's Dissertation (1779), Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses Robert Burns's sources and manuscripts for his expansion of the song "Ay waukin, O," first published as song 213 in James Johnson's Scots Musical Museum, III (1790); highlights an often neglected and misdated printed item, William Tytler’s Dissertation, as Burns's source for two of the four stanzas; considers the two full-length manuscripts, identifying one as being an Antique Smith forgery, and detailing the provenance and purpose, of the other, now at the Birthplace Museum; examines and reproduces the Roy manuscript and its pencilled additions; and so clarifies the relationship among the three genuine manuscripts to ...


Scots Take The Wheel: The Problem Of Period And The Medieval Scots Alliterative Thirteen-Line Stanza, Andrew W. Klein May 2017

Scots Take The Wheel: The Problem Of Period And The Medieval Scots Alliterative Thirteen-Line Stanza, Andrew W. Klein

Studies in Scottish Literature

Examines distinctively Scottish forms of the alliterative thirteen-line stanza, best known in standard English surveys from Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and argues that the stanza has a longer, more varied, independent use in Scottish poetry that should not be treated primarily in terms of English parallels.


Sorley Maclean's Other Clearance Poems, Petra Johana Poncarová May 2017

Sorley Maclean's Other Clearance Poems, Petra Johana Poncarová

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the treatment of the Highland Clearances, specifically the clearances from his home-island of Raasay, in the work of the Gaelic poet Sorley MacLean (Somhairle MacGill-Eain, 1911-1996), not only in his best-known Clearance poem "Hallaig," but in his prose writings, his major early sequence An Cuilithionn (1939, but not fully published till 2011), and several important shorter poems, “Am Putan Airgid” (“The Silver Button”), “‘Tha na beanntan gun bhruidhinn,’” and (more fully) “Sgreapadal.”


Scotland And The Caribbean, Jo Durant Dec 2016

Scotland And The Caribbean, Jo Durant

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses (and summarizes) Michael Morris's recent book Scotland and the Caribbean, c. 1740-1833, concluding that it should be welcomed, not only as an introduction to specific writers, but as a good introduction to recent debates on the legacy of Caribbean slavery, as seen from a Scottish perspective.


Alexander Arbuthnot And The Lyric In Post-Reformation Scotland, Joanna Martin Dec 2016

Alexander Arbuthnot And The Lyric In Post-Reformation Scotland, Joanna Martin

Studies in Scottish Literature

Presents the first critical discussion of manuscript poems in the Maitland Quarto attributable to Alexander Arbuthnot (1538-1583), the first Protestant principal of King's College, Aberdeen; gives detailed discussion of attribution and textual issues; and discusses the effects of religious change on Arbuthnot's writing of amatory, ethical and devotional lyric in post-Reformation Scotland.


William Reid And The First Newspaper And Chapbook Publication Of Robert Burns's "Written In Friar's Carse Hermitage", Patrick G. Scott Nov 2016

William Reid And The First Newspaper And Chapbook Publication Of Robert Burns's "Written In Friar's Carse Hermitage", Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Traces the first newspaper and chapbook publication of Robert Burns's poem "Written in Friar's Carse Hermitage," written in 1788 and first published in September 1791 in the Glasgow Courier; links the publication to that of Burns's "Ode to the Shade [or in Memory] of [James] Thomson," written for the Earl of Buchan's Thomson commemoration that year; and connects publication in both formats to Burns's friend the Glasgow publisher William Reid, although this date for the chapbook antedates by several years the date usually given for the first chapbook publications by the firm of Brash and ...


Tam O' Shanter And Aesthetic Cultural Nationalism, Gerard Lee Mckeever May 2016

Tam O' Shanter And Aesthetic Cultural Nationalism, Gerard Lee Mckeever

Studies in Scottish Literature

Drawing on recent debates about Burns and Scottish romanticism, particularly comments by Murray Pittock, Nigel Leask, and Ian Duncan, discusses the pivotal scene in Robert Burns's poem "Tam o' Shanter," in which Tam's vision of the witches' carnival is framed by the window of Alloway Kirk, and argues that this can be read as a framing and aestheticization not only of folk heritage, but of a national self-image, a recalibration of nationhood.


'As I Walk'd By Mysel': A Burns Autograph Manuscript And The Problem Of Attribution, Patrick G. Scott May 2016

'As I Walk'd By Mysel': A Burns Autograph Manuscript And The Problem Of Attribution, Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Describes and illustrates Robert Burns's autograph manuscript of the song "As I walk'd by mysel'" (Kinsley 686), reviews the issues and problems in attributing manuscript songs to Burns, traces the provenance of the unique manuscript, and compares the Burns version to that published by David Herd's Antient and Modern Scotish Songs (1776 etc.), concluding that the manuscript was sent by Burns to James Johnson for possible inclusion in the Scots Musical Museum, and that, while the song is not original with Burns, he may have tinkered with specific phrases to improve it.


"A Flame That Is Burning The World": Edwin Muir, War, And History, Margery Palmer Mcculloch May 2016

"A Flame That Is Burning The World": Edwin Muir, War, And History, Margery Palmer Mcculloch

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the impact of successive wars on the Scottish poet, translator and critic Edwin Muir (1887-1959), with especial focus on his experiences in post-World War II Prague and his response to the threat of nuclear warfare and human annihilation.


Books Noted And Received, Patrick G. Scott May 2016

Books Noted And Received, Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Brief reviews of twenty-five recent publications in Scottish literary studies, including editions of works by Burns, Hogg, and Stevenson, and biographies of John Moore, John Pinkerton, and Alexander Smith.


Ossianic Telegraphy: Bardic Networks And Imperial Relays, Eric Gidal Dec 2015

Ossianic Telegraphy: Bardic Networks And Imperial Relays, Eric Gidal

Studies in Scottish Literature

Relates James Macpherson's Fragments of Ancient Poetry (1760) and other Ossianic poems to evolving Scottish networks of commerce and communication, especially commercial telegraphy and the postal system, and posits associations also with comments in Adam Smith's Lectures on Jurisprudence and Theory of Moral Sentiments, to suggest that Macpherson's remediation of oral poetry asserted ideas of authorial identity and readership as "relays" in a new imperial network.


Radical Attribution: Robert Burns And 'The Liberty Tree', Corey E. Andrews Dec 2015

Radical Attribution: Robert Burns And 'The Liberty Tree', Corey E. Andrews

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the political symbolism of liberty trees in the American and French revolutions, and in Scotland in Burns's period, as background to reconsidering the song "The Liberty Tree," first printed among Burns's work by Robert Chambers in 1838, the authorship of which has remained a subject for debate among Burnsians; examines the song closely in terms of phrasing to argue that it is unlikely to be by Burns; and draws a distinction between attributing the song to Burns and its evident reliance on his iconic standing both in his own time and among later Scottish radicals.


'Epitaph' On Grizzel Grim: A Newly-Discovered Manuscript In The Hand Of Robert Burns, Jonathan Henderson, Pauline Mackay, Pamela Mcintyre Dec 2015

'Epitaph' On Grizzel Grim: A Newly-Discovered Manuscript In The Hand Of Robert Burns, Jonathan Henderson, Pauline Mackay, Pamela Mcintyre

Studies in Scottish Literature

Describes and reproduces a newly-discovered Burns manuscript, with notes and numerical calculations relating to his work as an Excise Officer, and the four-line 'Epitaph' on Grizzel Grim (Kinsley II:926); discusses its publication history, attribution to Burns, and relation to Burns's ballad of similar title; gives a collation of variant readings; and transcribes related notes about the manuscript from the Craufurdland Castle papers.


Burns's Politics 'In Another View': Late 1792/Early 1793, Robert P. Irvine Dec 2015

Burns's Politics 'In Another View': Late 1792/Early 1793, Robert P. Irvine

Studies in Scottish Literature

Presents a reconsideration of Burns's political views in 1792-1793, examining in detail the original performance context of his poem "The Rights of Woman," in the Dumfries Theatre in November 1792, and the political context of his song "Why should na poor people mow," as first sent in letters to Robert Cleghorn in December 1792 and to Robert Graham of Fintry in January 1793, arguing that such "political" poems might be read less in terms of French or metropolitan revolutionary politics than in terms of major cultural and social changes in the Scottish community and networks to which Burns belonged.


In The Midst Of Our Human Civil War: Hamish Henderson’S War Poetry And Soldier’S Songs, Corey Gibson Nov 2014

In The Midst Of Our Human Civil War: Hamish Henderson’S War Poetry And Soldier’S Songs, Corey Gibson

Studies in Scottish Literature

Surveys the war poetry of the Scottish poet, folklorist, and folk-singer Hamish Henderson (1919-2002), including his service with the 51st Highland Division in the Western Desert and Sicily, drawing a contrast between his long modernist poem Elegies for the Dead in Cyrenaica (1948) and the songs in his collection Ballads of World War II (Glasgow: Lili Marleen Club, 1947), in light of Henderson's developing political ideas and engagement with the Italian cultural theorist Antonio Gramsci.