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Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Adam Smith For Our Time, I: Necroeconomics, Patrick G. Scott May 2016

Adam Smith For Our Time, I: Necroeconomics, Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Reviews a wide-ranging new American study of the Scottish philosopher and economist Adam Smith (1723-1790), examining its treatment of Smith as critic and rhetorical theorist, as well as of his better-known writings on moral philosophy in his Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759) and economic theory in The Wealth of Nations (1776), and discusses briefly the value for Scottish cultural history of interpretative practices developed originally in other national traditions, concluding that the book is "important for scholars of 18th century Scottish literature... because it approaches Smith’s work through disciplinary practices that are common enough in other literary fields ...


Adam Smith For Our Times, Ii: Of Sympathy And Selfishness, Michael Gavin Mar 2016

Adam Smith For Our Times, Ii: Of Sympathy And Selfishness, Michael Gavin

Studies in Scottish Literature

Summarizes the published proceedings of a recent conference at Mercer University discussing the significance for 21st century America of the 18th century Scottish philosopher and economist Adam Smith, and offers a critical perspective.


Ossianic Telegraphy: Bardic Networks And Imperial Relays, Eric Gidal Dec 2015

Ossianic Telegraphy: Bardic Networks And Imperial Relays, Eric Gidal

Studies in Scottish Literature

Relates James Macpherson's Fragments of Ancient Poetry (1760) and other Ossianic poems to evolving Scottish networks of commerce and communication, especially commercial telegraphy and the postal system, and posits associations also with comments in Adam Smith's Lectures on Jurisprudence and Theory of Moral Sentiments, to suggest that Macpherson's remediation of oral poetry asserted ideas of authorial identity and readership as "relays" in a new imperial network.