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Edinburgh Monuments, The Literary Canon, And Cultural Nationalism: A Comparative Perspective, Silvia Mergenthal Dec 2016

Edinburgh Monuments, The Literary Canon, And Cultural Nationalism: A Comparative Perspective, Silvia Mergenthal

Studies in Scottish Literature

Building on comparative studies of the "memory landscapes" of cities and monuments, describes three different monument series in Edinburgh, the Canongate Wall at the Scottish Parliament building at Holyrood, the flagstone quotations in Makar's Court near the Writers' Museum, and the grouped herms in the Edinburgh Business Park; discusses how the authors included in each series were selected and how each relates to the formal and informal Scottish literary canon; and briefly indicates what comparative scholarship suggests about the relation of such monuments to the development of cultural nationalism.


Mobbing, (Dis)Order And The Literary Pig In The Tale Of Colkelbie Sow, Pars Prima, Caitlin Flynn Dec 2016

Mobbing, (Dis)Order And The Literary Pig In The Tale Of Colkelbie Sow, Pars Prima, Caitlin Flynn

Studies in Scottish Literature

Sets the portrayal of the pig in the anonymous Scots fifteenth-century poem The Tale of Colkelbie Sow in the context of medieval fears of social disorder and mob rule, drawing on medieval accounts of the criminal trials of unruly pigs and other animals, and recent discussions of Scottish and medieval literary humour.


'Rebellious Highlanders': The Reception Of Corsica In The Edinburgh Periodical Press, 1730-1800, Rhona Brown Dec 2016

'Rebellious Highlanders': The Reception Of Corsica In The Edinburgh Periodical Press, 1730-1800, Rhona Brown

Studies in Scottish Literature

Examines the way Scottish periodicals, especially the Weekly Magazine and the Caledonian Mercury, reported and discussed the nationalist resistance in Corsica against first Genoese and then French rule; recalibrates the role of James Boswell in shaping Scottish opinion about Corsica, especially in his Account of Corsica (1768); notes the parallels made by Scottish commentators between the Corsican resistance under Pascal Paoli and the Scottish highlands, especially the Jacobite risings of 1715 and 1745; and suggests the value of looking at the distinctive responses of Scottish periodicals, not just the print networks based on London.


Scotland And The Caribbean, Jo Durant Dec 2016

Scotland And The Caribbean, Jo Durant

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses (and summarizes) Michael Morris's recent book Scotland and the Caribbean, c. 1740-1833, concluding that it should be welcomed, not only as an introduction to specific writers, but as a good introduction to recent debates on the legacy of Caribbean slavery, as seen from a Scottish perspective.


Alexander Arbuthnot And The Lyric In Post-Reformation Scotland, Joanna Martin Dec 2016

Alexander Arbuthnot And The Lyric In Post-Reformation Scotland, Joanna Martin

Studies in Scottish Literature

Presents the first critical discussion of manuscript poems in the Maitland Quarto attributable to Alexander Arbuthnot (1538-1583), the first Protestant principal of King's College, Aberdeen; gives detailed discussion of attribution and textual issues; and discusses the effects of religious change on Arbuthnot's writing of amatory, ethical and devotional lyric in post-Reformation Scotland.


Introduction: Spatial Humanities And Scottish Studies, Eric Gidal, Michael Gavin Nov 2016

Introduction: Spatial Humanities And Scottish Studies, Eric Gidal, Michael Gavin

Studies in Scottish Literature

Introduces the 2016 SSL Symposium on Spatial Humanities and Scottish Studies, reviewing recent discussion on the spatial understanding of Scottish history and culture and providing extensive references to relevant geographical and digital humanities scholarship.


Topic Modeling And The Historical Geography Of Scotland, Michael Gavin, Eric Gidal Nov 2016

Topic Modeling And The Historical Geography Of Scotland, Michael Gavin, Eric Gidal

Studies in Scottish Literature

Presents selected findings from a larger project using topic modeling for clusters of keywords from a defined corpus of 18th and 19th century Scottish topographical sources (including the Old and New Statistical Surveys), linked to GIS mapping, to explore such topics as Scottish industry, transport, antiquities, print culture, and religion, with 10 maps included in the article text.


Imagining Evil: George Macdonald's The Wise Woman: A Parable (1875), Colin Manlove Nov 2016

Imagining Evil: George Macdonald's The Wise Woman: A Parable (1875), Colin Manlove

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses a neglected and uncharacteristic children's story, The Wise Woman, by the Victorian Scottish novelist and fantasy writer George MacDonald, setting it in the context of MacDonald's own development and of other Victorian children's moral fantasy, concluding that "The Wise Woman is not simply a story of the attempted correction of two children, but a vision of good and evil in the mind and in God’s creation.... In its moral and spiritual complexity, and its picture of divine grace all about us if we will open our hearts, The Wise Woman has a profundity and a ...


Preface To Ssl 42:2, Patrick G. Scott, Tony Jarrells Nov 2016

Preface To Ssl 42:2, Patrick G. Scott, Tony Jarrells

Studies in Scottish Literature

Preface articulating the purpose of the SSL symposium series and the symposium on Spatial Humanities, and a brief introduction to the other articles in the issue.


Curious Travellers: Thomas Pennant And The Welsh And Scottish Tour (1760-1820), Alex Deans, Nigel Leask Nov 2016

Curious Travellers: Thomas Pennant And The Welsh And Scottish Tour (1760-1820), Alex Deans, Nigel Leask

Studies in Scottish Literature

Describes the digital mapping element in a collaborative AHRC-funded project Curious Travellers, that combines the editing and critical interpretation of early Romantic-period travel writing with cartographical work involving digitized historic maps, especially in the correspondence and manuscript and published travel journals of the Welsh naturalist Thomas Pennant (1726-1798), and provides examples of the issues involved in matching texts and maps, particularly for Gaelic place-names.


English Literature And Scottish University Reform: David Masson's State Of Learning In Scotland, Jack M. Downs Nov 2016

English Literature And Scottish University Reform: David Masson's State Of Learning In Scotland, Jack M. Downs

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the role of the Victorian critic David Masson, Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature at the University of Edinburgh, in the mid-Victorian reform of the Scottish university curriculum, as mandated by the Scottish Universities Act (1858), in light of the late George Elder Davie's influential study The Democratic Intellect and subsequent scholarship, and examines Masson's two inaugural lectures, particularly his State of Learning in Scotland (1866), and his inclusion in his Edinburgh lectures of Scottish literature within a British teaching canon.


Authority And The Narrative Voice In Stevenson's Weir Of Hermiston, Gillian Hughes Nov 2016

Authority And The Narrative Voice In Stevenson's Weir Of Hermiston, Gillian Hughes

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses and analyzes Robert Louis Stevenson's use of the narrator's voice in his short, unfinished novel Weir of Hermiston, comparing his narrative strategies with those of Walter Scott, George Moore, George Douglas Brown, D.H. Lawrence, and Lewis Grassic Gibbon, concluding that "Stevenson’s fictions are experimental works," that "respond ingeniously to the dominant and quasi-official formulae and assumptions of writers of classic Victorian novels, and in turn establish an important model from which subsequent British novelists ... could learn."


William Reid And The First Newspaper And Chapbook Publication Of Robert Burns's "Written In Friar's Carse Hermitage", Patrick G. Scott Nov 2016

William Reid And The First Newspaper And Chapbook Publication Of Robert Burns's "Written In Friar's Carse Hermitage", Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Traces the first newspaper and chapbook publication of Robert Burns's poem "Written in Friar's Carse Hermitage," written in 1788 and first published in September 1791 in the Glasgow Courier; links the publication to that of Burns's "Ode to the Shade [or in Memory] of [James] Thomson," written for the Earl of Buchan's Thomson commemoration that year; and connects publication in both formats to Burns's friend the Glasgow publisher William Reid, although this date for the chapbook antedates by several years the date usually given for the first chapbook publications by the firm of Brash and ...


Books Noted And Received, Patrick G. Scott Nov 2016

Books Noted And Received, Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Short reviews or brief notices of seventeen books published or received since publication of Studies in Scottish Literature, 42:1 (Spring 2016).


Contributors To Ssl 42:2 Nov 2016

Contributors To Ssl 42:2

Studies in Scottish Literature

Brief biographical notes on the literary scholars and digital humanists contributing to the volume.


Digital Literary Geography And The Difficulties Of Locating 'Redgauntlet Country', Christopher Donaldson, Sally Bushell, Ian N. Gregory, Joanna E. Taylor, Paul Rayson Nov 2016

Digital Literary Geography And The Difficulties Of Locating 'Redgauntlet Country', Christopher Donaldson, Sally Bushell, Ian N. Gregory, Joanna E. Taylor, Paul Rayson

Studies in Scottish Literature

Presents a case study about Sir Walter Scott's Jacobite novel Redgauntlet (1824), drawn from larger grant-funded projects in historical geographical information systems based at Lancaster University, reviewing a variety of other historic literary mapping projects, describing the text corpus of Lake District sources and models used in the larger projects, and contrasting the location of Scott's fictional geography and places in the Solway Firth area of South-West Scotland with the historic places, largely across the border in North-West England, to which he also refers.


Writing Scotland's Future: Speculative Fiction And The National Imagination, Timothy C. Baker Nov 2016

Writing Scotland's Future: Speculative Fiction And The National Imagination, Timothy C. Baker

Studies in Scottish Literature

Explores the fictional treatment of future Scotlands in the wake of the 2014 Referendum, through discussion of varied speculative novels or stories by Graham Dunstan, Paul Johnston, Ken Macleod, Matthew Fitt, Julie Bertagna, Momus, Andrew Crumey, A.L.Kennedy, Michael Faber, and Sarah Hall, arguing that "the relation between Scottish literature and Scottish politics is more complex than is often thought," that "rather than simply commenting on current political situations, much contemporary Scottish fiction offers a rethinking of politics entirely," and that "Scotland’s future is not, and cannot be, confined to a single narrative."


Spatial Humanities And Memory Studies: Mapping Edinburgh In The First Age Of The Enlightenment, Murray Pittock, Craig Lamont Nov 2016

Spatial Humanities And Memory Studies: Mapping Edinburgh In The First Age Of The Enlightenment, Murray Pittock, Craig Lamont

Studies in Scottish Literature

Describes the first phase of a digital project mapping social and cultural relationships in early 18th century Edinburgh, Scotland, part of a larger AHRC grant-funded study Allan Ramsay and Edinburgh in the First Age of the Enlightenment; explores interrelations between urban history, digital mapping, and emerging interest in the field of memory studies; and suggests links between the heterogeneous and cosmopolitan nature of housing in early 18th century Edinburgh and the Scottish Enlightenment culture of innovation.


Tam O' Shanter And Aesthetic Cultural Nationalism, Gerard Lee Mckeever May 2016

Tam O' Shanter And Aesthetic Cultural Nationalism, Gerard Lee Mckeever

Studies in Scottish Literature

Drawing on recent debates about Burns and Scottish romanticism, particularly comments by Murray Pittock, Nigel Leask, and Ian Duncan, discusses the pivotal scene in Robert Burns's poem "Tam o' Shanter," in which Tam's vision of the witches' carnival is framed by the window of Alloway Kirk, and argues that this can be read as a framing and aestheticization not only of folk heritage, but of a national self-image, a recalibration of nationhood.


'As I Walk'd By Mysel': A Burns Autograph Manuscript And The Problem Of Attribution, Patrick G. Scott May 2016

'As I Walk'd By Mysel': A Burns Autograph Manuscript And The Problem Of Attribution, Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Describes and illustrates Robert Burns's autograph manuscript of the song "As I walk'd by mysel'" (Kinsley 686), reviews the issues and problems in attributing manuscript songs to Burns, traces the provenance of the unique manuscript, and compares the Burns version to that published by David Herd's Antient and Modern Scotish Songs (1776 etc.), concluding that the manuscript was sent by Burns to James Johnson for possible inclusion in the Scots Musical Museum, and that, while the song is not original with Burns, he may have tinkered with specific phrases to improve it.


Scotland In European Perspective: The Mainz-Germersheim Conference Before The Referendum, Patrick G. Scott May 2016

Scotland In European Perspective: The Mainz-Germersheim Conference Before The Referendum, Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Reviews the published papers on political, literary, and cultural aspects of Scottish cultural identity from a conference held at Johnannes Gutenberg University-Mainz at Germersheim, Germany, in October 2013, before the narrowly-unsuccessful Scottish Independence referendum of the following year ["Indyref"], and discusses their continuing relevance in Scottish attitudes to the upcoming United Kingdom referendum on British withdrawal from the European Union ["Brexit"].


Contributors To Ssl 42:1 May 2016

Contributors To Ssl 42:1

Studies in Scottish Literature

No abstract provided.


The W. Ormiston Roy Memorial Lecture: Who Wrote The Scots Musical Museum? Challenging Editorial Practice In The Presence Of Authorial Absence, Murray Pittock May 2016

The W. Ormiston Roy Memorial Lecture: Who Wrote The Scots Musical Museum? Challenging Editorial Practice In The Presence Of Authorial Absence, Murray Pittock

Studies in Scottish Literature

James Johnson’s Scots Musical Museum, published in six parts in Edinburgh over the period 1787-1803, is now inextricably linked to its greatest contributor, the poet, song-writer and song-collector Robert Burns. This lecture builds from Murray Pittock’s recent editorial work on Johnson’s collection, forthcoming in the new multivolume Oxford Edition of Robert Burns, based at the University of Glasgow. The lecture shows that the apparently-innocent question “Who wrote the Scots Musical Museum?” is a complex one, raising very fundamental questions about the nature of authorship and editorship in the necessarily collaborative and social enterprise of song publication, and ...


James Hogg's The Brownie Of Bodsbeck: An Unconventional National Tale, Barbara Leonardi May 2016

James Hogg's The Brownie Of Bodsbeck: An Unconventional National Tale, Barbara Leonardi

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses James Hogg's historical novel The Brownie of Bodsbeck (1818), set in the time of the religious Covenanters in late 17th century Scotland, with particular attention to the central woman character, Katharine Laidlaw; traces contemporary comment on the novel; and contrasts Hogg's distinctive portrayal of marriage with its use by other writers (particularly Scott) to plot national (and historical) reconciliation, arguing that Hogg uses the marriage plot to critique the emergent ideology of the national tale.


"A Flame That Is Burning The World": Edwin Muir, War, And History, Margery Palmer Mcculloch May 2016

"A Flame That Is Burning The World": Edwin Muir, War, And History, Margery Palmer Mcculloch

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the impact of successive wars on the Scottish poet, translator and critic Edwin Muir (1887-1959), with especial focus on his experiences in post-World War II Prague and his response to the threat of nuclear warfare and human annihilation.


Adam Smith For Our Time, I: Necroeconomics, Patrick G. Scott May 2016

Adam Smith For Our Time, I: Necroeconomics, Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Reviews a wide-ranging new American study of the Scottish philosopher and economist Adam Smith (1723-1790), examining its treatment of Smith as critic and rhetorical theorist, as well as of his better-known writings on moral philosophy in his Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759) and economic theory in The Wealth of Nations (1776), and discusses briefly the value for Scottish cultural history of interpretative practices developed originally in other national traditions, concluding that the book is "important for scholars of 18th century Scottish literature... because it approaches Smith’s work through disciplinary practices that are common enough in other literary fields ...


Books Noted And Received, Patrick G. Scott May 2016

Books Noted And Received, Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Brief reviews of twenty-five recent publications in Scottish literary studies, including editions of works by Burns, Hogg, and Stevenson, and biographies of John Moore, John Pinkerton, and Alexander Smith.


Recovering The Reformation Heritage In George Mackay Brown's Greenvoe, Richard Rankin Russell May 2016

Recovering The Reformation Heritage In George Mackay Brown's Greenvoe, Richard Rankin Russell

Studies in Scottish Literature

Suggests that attitudes to Presbyterianism and the Scottish Kirk in much 20th century Scottish literary criticism have been too negative, and explores the religious heritage and selected writings of the Orcadian poet and novelist George Mackay Brown (1921-1996), a Catholic convert, to argue that Brown's best-known novel, Greenvoe (1972), draws not only on Catholic, and older pagan, symbolism, but also on aspects of the Reformed or Calvinist tradition.


Preface To Ssl 42:1, Patrick G. Scott, Anthony Jarrells May 2016

Preface To Ssl 42:1, Patrick G. Scott, Anthony Jarrells

Studies in Scottish Literature

No abstract provided.


Adam Smith For Our Times, Ii: Of Sympathy And Selfishness, Michael Gavin Mar 2016

Adam Smith For Our Times, Ii: Of Sympathy And Selfishness, Michael Gavin

Studies in Scottish Literature

Summarizes the published proceedings of a recent conference at Mercer University discussing the significance for 21st century America of the 18th century Scottish philosopher and economist Adam Smith, and offers a critical perspective.