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The Ssl Symposium, 2014: Creative Writing, The Academy, And The Scottish Literary Canon: Introduction, Patrick G. Scott Nov 2014

The Ssl Symposium, 2014: Creative Writing, The Academy, And The Scottish Literary Canon: Introduction, Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Reviews the parallel growth of creative writing courses and Scottish literary studies since the 1960s, with reference to the changing influence of Scottish writers in the definition of the field and the reputation of earlier literary works.


Regina Hewitt, Ed., John Galt: Observations And Conjectures, Anthony Jarrells Nov 2014

Regina Hewitt, Ed., John Galt: Observations And Conjectures, Anthony Jarrells

Studies in Scottish Literature

Review of collection of scholarly essays on the Scottish novelist and poet John Galt (1779-1839), who was also a pioneer in Canadian fiction.


“The Future Of The Planet”− Scottish Cosmopolitanism/ Cosmofeminism And Environmentalism In Theresa Breslin’S Saskia’S Journey, Fiona Mcculloch Nov 2014

“The Future Of The Planet”− Scottish Cosmopolitanism/ Cosmofeminism And Environmentalism In Theresa Breslin’S Saskia’S Journey, Fiona Mcculloch

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses major themes and concerns in the young adult novel Saskia's Journey, by Theresa Breslin, with special attention to the relation between Breslin's environmental themes (and Scottish setting) with her portrayal of the novel's central character and multigenerational family relationships.


Hobsbaum And His Legacy, Adrian Hunter Nov 2014

Hobsbaum And His Legacy, Adrian Hunter

Studies in Scottish Literature

Recounts and assesses the impact of the poet and critic Philip Hobsbaum (1932-2005) on the development and role of creative writing within university English departments, both at Queern's University, Belfast, but more especially after he moved to the University of Glasgow.


Books Noted And Received, Patrick G. Scott, John T. Knox Nov 2014

Books Noted And Received, Patrick G. Scott, John T. Knox

Studies in Scottish Literature

Brief reviews of twenty-four recent books in Scottish literary and cultural studies.


Notes On Contributors To Ssl 40 Nov 2014

Notes On Contributors To Ssl 40

Studies in Scottish Literature

No abstract provided.


Tollerators And Con-Tollerators (1703) And Archibald Pitcairne: Text, Background And Authorship, John Macqueen Nov 2014

Tollerators And Con-Tollerators (1703) And Archibald Pitcairne: Text, Background And Authorship, John Macqueen

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the historical background and theatrical characteristics of a short satirical play set in Edinburgh in 1703, giving the background to the Scottish Parliament's divisions over (and presbyterian hostility to) an act to give religious toleration to Episcopalian ministers; argues that the most probable author is the Jacobite poet and playwright Dr. Archibald Pitcairne (1652-1713); and presents the first modern annotated text of the play.


After Macdiarmid: Creative Writers, The Canon, And The Academy, Alan Riach Nov 2014

After Macdiarmid: Creative Writers, The Canon, And The Academy, Alan Riach

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the changed situation of writers within Scottish universities since the 1960s, the role of creative writers in introducing American poets into the Scottish teaching canon, and the value of creative writing in stimulating critical reading.


Doing And Teaching, Roderick Watson Nov 2014

Doing And Teaching, Roderick Watson

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the decision at the University of Stirling, Scotland, in the late 1960s, to appoint a Scottish poet, Norman MacCaig, to the permanent faculty, and to include creative writing options within the English studies degree program. Assesses subsequent developments and argues for the value of such integration for all literature undergraduates.


How Scottish Is The Scottish Psalter? William Mure Of Rowallan, Zachary Boyd, And The Metrical Psalter Of 1650, Peter Auger Nov 2014

How Scottish Is The Scottish Psalter? William Mure Of Rowallan, Zachary Boyd, And The Metrical Psalter Of 1650, Peter Auger

Studies in Scottish Literature

Reassesses the origin and sources for the Scottish metrical psalter of 1650, in particular the contributions and influence of Sir William Mure of Rowallan and Zachary Boyd, questioning the statistical analysis of specific phrases by William Rorison on which most previous discussions have relied, and focusing instead on circumstances of the revision, the complex interrelation of multiple available versions, and the significance of Mure's version as a model of what Scottish psalmody could be, rather than as a source for particular verses or lines.


David Masson And Thomas Carlyle, Ian M. Campbell Nov 2014

David Masson And Thomas Carlyle, Ian M. Campbell

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the forty-year friendship between the Scottish historian and essayist Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881) and the critic and literary scholar David Masson (1822-1907), regius professor of rhetoric and English literature at the University of Edinburgh, and explores their correspondence, their interactions (especially Masson's first visit to the Carlyle household, as reported by Jane Welsh Carlyle, and Carlyle's visit to Edinburgh to give his inaugural address at Rector of the University), and the influence of Carlyle on Masson's writing, especially his monumental Life of John Milton.


In The Midst Of Our Human Civil War: Hamish Henderson’S War Poetry And Soldier’S Songs, Corey Gibson Nov 2014

In The Midst Of Our Human Civil War: Hamish Henderson’S War Poetry And Soldier’S Songs, Corey Gibson

Studies in Scottish Literature

Surveys the war poetry of the Scottish poet, folklorist, and folk-singer Hamish Henderson (1919-2002), including his service with the 51st Highland Division in the Western Desert and Sicily, drawing a contrast between his long modernist poem Elegies for the Dead in Cyrenaica (1948) and the songs in his collection Ballads of World War II (Glasgow: Lili Marleen Club, 1947), in light of Henderson's developing political ideas and engagement with the Italian cultural theorist Antonio Gramsci.


Tartan Noir And The Scottish Literary Canon, Matt Mcguire Nov 2014

Tartan Noir And The Scottish Literary Canon, Matt Mcguire

Studies in Scottish Literature

Takes up Willy Maley's recent critique of Scottish university literature teaching (in SSL 38) and argues that Scottish creative writing, especially the crime novels that James Ellroy labelled Tartan Noir, has stimulated new critical readings of such earlier Scottish writers as James Hogg and Robert Louis Stevenson.


The First Publication Of Burns's 'Tam O' Shanter', Bill Dawson Nov 2014

The First Publication Of Burns's 'Tam O' Shanter', Bill Dawson

Studies in Scottish Literature

Examines the early publication history of Robert Burns's poem "Alloway Kirk" or "Tam o' Shanter," which Burns wrote for Francis Grose's illustrated Antiquities of Scotl;and (1789-1791), describing Grose's method of publication in parts, restoring the priority of Grose's publication of the poem, and refuting assertions that the poem has appeared slightly earlier in two Edinburgh periodicals.


An Autograph Manuscript Of Robert Burns’S “Afton Braes”, Patrick G. Scott Nov 2014

An Autograph Manuscript Of Robert Burns’S “Afton Braes”, Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Describes and illustrates the autograph manuscript of the song "Afton Braes" ("Flow gently, sweet Afton"), by the Scottish poet Robert Burns (1759-1796), recently acquired by the G. Ross Roy Collection, University of South Carolina Libraries, giving a collation of variants against the other major sources, examining the paper's watermark and excise stamping, and exploring both the provenance of the manuscript itself and its significance for the University of South Carolina.


George Mackay Brown’S “Celia”: The Creative Conversion Of A Catholic Heroine, Linden Bicket Nov 2014

George Mackay Brown’S “Celia”: The Creative Conversion Of A Catholic Heroine, Linden Bicket

Studies in Scottish Literature

Compares the early manuscript and published text of a short story "Celia," by the Scottish Orcadian writer, poet, and Catholic convert George Mackay Brown (1921-1996), to examine the depiction of alcoholism in the story, the influence of Graham Greene, and Brown's softening or repression of his original explicit Catholic themes and imagery when revising the story for publication.


Archibald Pitcairne’S The Phanaticks, Ed. John Macqueen, Murray Pittock Nov 2014

Archibald Pitcairne’S The Phanaticks, Ed. John Macqueen, Murray Pittock

Studies in Scottish Literature

Review of the first scholarly edition of a satirical play The Phanaticks (1691) [previously titled "The Assembly"] by the Scottish Jacobite poet and physician Dr. Archibald Pitcairne (1652-1713).


Hamish Henderson And Nelson Mandela: Notes For “Rivonia”, Patrick G. Scott Nov 2014

Hamish Henderson And Nelson Mandela: Notes For “Rivonia”, Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Describes and reproduces manuscript notesin the G. Ross Roy Collection University of South Carolina Libraries, for the protest song "Rivonia" ("Free Mandela"), written by the Scottish poet, folklorist and folksinger Hamish Henderson (1919-2002) in 1963-64 in response to the trial of Nelson Mandela and other leaders of the African National Congress who had been arrested at Rivonia, South Africa and sentenced to life imprisonment on Robben Island; assesses the influence of Henderson's song, which was recorded in 1964 by the Corries Trio, and sung at the anti-apartheid protests at Murrayfield, Edinburgh, against the visit of the Springboks rugby team ...


Authorial Disguise And Intertextuality: Scott’S The Lay Of The Last Minstrel, Coleridge, And Keats, Beth Lau Nov 2014

Authorial Disguise And Intertextuality: Scott’S The Lay Of The Last Minstrel, Coleridge, And Keats, Beth Lau

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses Walter Scott's first published poem The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), exploring the relation between Scott's use of disguise and distancing devices with his use of anonymity in his fiction, and explores the intertextual relationships between his poem and other poems of the romantic era.


The Popular Voice In Sir David Lyndsay's Satire Of The Thrie Estaitis, Greg Walker Nov 2014

The Popular Voice In Sir David Lyndsay's Satire Of The Thrie Estaitis, Greg Walker

Studies in Scottish Literature

Analyzes the representation of the Scottish people in the 16th century Scottish drama A Satire of the Thrie Estaitis by Sir David Lyndsay [or Lindsay] (1490-1555), through the figure of the Pauper or Poor Man in the first version (the 1540 interlude performed at Linlithgow), and the character of John of the Commonwealth in the two fuller versions (at Cupar in 1552 and Edinburgh in 1554). Distinguishes Lyndsay's Pauper from equivalent figures in plays by John Bale and Nicholas Udall, and argues (by contrast with Tyrone Guthrie's famous 1948 Edinburgh festival production) that John of the Commonwealth is ...


'They Gang In Stirks And Come Out Asses': Creative Writing And Scottish Studies, Liam Mcilvanney Nov 2014

'They Gang In Stirks And Come Out Asses': Creative Writing And Scottish Studies, Liam Mcilvanney

Studies in Scottish Literature

Recounts the experience as a student of the New Zealand poet James K. Baxter and discusses the interrelation of creative writing and literary scholarship, in Scottish universities and in New Zealand.


Prelims, Preface To Ssl 40, Patrick G. Scott, Anthony Jarrells Nov 2014

Prelims, Preface To Ssl 40, Patrick G. Scott, Anthony Jarrells

Studies in Scottish Literature

No abstract provided.


Three Books On The Scottish Sixties, Greg Thomas Nov 2014

Three Books On The Scottish Sixties, Greg Thomas

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses three recent books about Scottish culture in the 1960s: a collection of documents and interviews, The International Writers' Conference Revisited, ed. Bartie and Bell; a collection of essays, The Scottish Sixties, ed. Bell and Gunn; and a monograph, The Edinburgh Festivals, by Angela Bartie.