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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Prelims, Preface To Ssl 39: G. Ross Roy And Susan Manning, Patrick G. Scott, Anthony Jarrells Aug 2013

Prelims, Preface To Ssl 39: G. Ross Roy And Susan Manning, Patrick G. Scott, Anthony Jarrells

Studies in Scottish Literature

Preface includes information on usage of the digital version of Studies in Scottish Literature in its first year, together with short tributes to two board members who recently died, the journal's founder G. Ross Roy, and Prof. Susan Manning of the University of Edinburgh.


Divergent Authenticities: Editing Scottish Literary Texts: Introduction: How Editorial Theories Have Changed, Patrick G. Scott Aug 2013

Divergent Authenticities: Editing Scottish Literary Texts: Introduction: How Editorial Theories Have Changed, Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Reviews changing approaches to the editing of Scottish literary texts, from the dominance of the Greg-Bowers theory of copytext to the emergence of the Social Text theory associated with Mackenzie and McGann; illustrates the developments from a variety of major Scottish authors and scholarly editions (specifically Thomas Carlyle and Walter Scott); and concludes by discussing the critical implications of differing approaches to editing two frequently-taught Scottish works, Robert Burns's "Tam o' Shanter" and Hugh MacDiarmid's A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle.


Textual Messages: Scholarly Editions And Their Role In Literary Criticism, Alison Lumsden Aug 2013

Textual Messages: Scholarly Editions And Their Role In Literary Criticism, Alison Lumsden

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the editing of Scottish literary texts, specifically recent editions of Walter Scott and James Hogg, and argues that textual investigation is not simply technical and preliminary but an integral part of literary criticism.


Editing The Letters Of A Scottish Author, Gillian Hughes Aug 2013

Editing The Letters Of A Scottish Author, Gillian Hughes

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the issues and techniques in finding, researching, transcribing, editing, formatting and annotating the letters of a nineteenth-century Scottish author, drawing on experience in editing The Collected Letters of James Hogg, 3 vols. (Edinburgh University Press, 2004-2008).


Wraiths, Rhetoric, And "The Sin Of Rhyme"" The Shaping Of The Burns Of The Kilmarnock Edition, Kenneth G. Simpson Aug 2013

Wraiths, Rhetoric, And "The Sin Of Rhyme"" The Shaping Of The Burns Of The Kilmarnock Edition, Kenneth G. Simpson

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses rhetorical self-consciousness in letters and poems of the Scottish poet Robert Burns (1759-1796), in contrast to earlier simplified romantic portrayals, and draws a comparison between Burns and Montaigne.


Deficiencies: Mental Disability And The Imagination In Scott's Waverley Novels, Colin Carman Aug 2013

Deficiencies: Mental Disability And The Imagination In Scott's Waverley Novels, Colin Carman

Studies in Scottish Literature

Argues that Walter Scott's novels, especially Waverley and The Heart of Midlothian, represent a shift in Anglo-scottish attitudes towards the mentally ill, and that mental disability, operating in Scott's novels under the guises of idiocy and insanity, was integral to Scott’s articulations of the romantic imagination.


Preventing Revolution: Cato Street, Bonnymuir, And Cathkin, John Gardner Aug 2013

Preventing Revolution: Cato Street, Bonnymuir, And Cathkin, John Gardner

Studies in Scottish Literature

Argues, from a range of evidence including popular poetry and woodcuts, that popular risings in 1820 in Scotland, England, and Ireland were produced as a coordinated strategy by central government in the aftermath of Peterloo to instigate (through agents provocateurs) local popular uprisings and then brutally suppress them, with show trials and public executions, in order to deter or forestall larger social unrest or revolution.


On Vernacular Scottishness And Its Limits: Devolution And The Spectacle Of "Voice", Scott Hames Aug 2013

On Vernacular Scottishness And Its Limits: Devolution And The Spectacle Of "Voice", Scott Hames

Studies in Scottish Literature

This essay asks why vernacular cultural expression has been so central to discussion of Scottish national autonomy, traces the literary and political contours of vernacular discourse in the period of Scottish devolution, and concludes with a provisional sketch of three "vernacularities" (democratic, romantic and identitarian) and with reflections on how literary criticism might move beyond the "representative” paradigms of vernacular voice to engage with voice as a principle of agency and action.


Books Received, John T. Knox, Patrick G. Scott Aug 2013

Books Received, John T. Knox, Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Publication details and short descriptions of over thirty recently-published books in Scottish literature and related fields.


For "The Prosperity Of Scotland": Mediating National Improvement In The Scots Magazine, 1739-49, Alex Benchimol Aug 2013

For "The Prosperity Of Scotland": Mediating National Improvement In The Scots Magazine, 1739-49, Alex Benchimol

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the early years the the Scots Magazine, founded in Edinburgh in 1739, examining the aims of its publishers, and the development of its political and economic views before and after the Jacobite Rising of 1745-46, in light of contemporary Scottish ideas of social and economic improvement.


G. Ross Roy As Editor, A Tribute, Carol Mcguirk Aug 2013

G. Ross Roy As Editor, A Tribute, Carol Mcguirk

Studies in Scottish Literature

Reviews the fifty-year history of the journal Studies in Scottish Literature since 1963 and pays tribute to the editorial work of its founder G. Ross Roy (1924-2013), sole editor of the journal 1963-2008, drawing attention to the range of subjects and approaches he welcomed and to his encouragement of women scholars.


The Ssl Symposium On Editing: A Commentary, Ian Duncan Aug 2013

The Ssl Symposium On Editing: A Commentary, Ian Duncan

Studies in Scottish Literature

Reviews and comments on the preceding essays in the SSL Symposium on Editing Scottish Literary Texts, setting them in the wider context of critical discussion, responding to some of the earlier comments comparing the recent collected editions of Walter Scott and James Hogg, and arguing that the "authentically democratic" work of making a fuller range of Scottish literary texts available moves critical discussion forward from the "tedious zero-sum game" of debating a static canon.


The Renaissance Uses Of A Medieval Seneca: Murder, Stoicism, And Gender In The Marginalia Of Glasgow Hunter 297, Theo Van Heijnsbergen Aug 2013

The Renaissance Uses Of A Medieval Seneca: Murder, Stoicism, And Gender In The Marginalia Of Glasgow Hunter 297, Theo Van Heijnsbergen

Studies in Scottish Literature

Examines, transcribes, and annotates the extensive marginalia in a medieval manuscript of Seneca's tragedies made by Sir William Sinclair of Mey (1582-1643), exploring some of the links between the original text, the marginal additions, the events of Sinclair's life, and the culture of Renaissance Scotland.


The Modern Athenians: The Edinburgh Review In The Knowledge Economy Of The Early Nineteenth Century, William Christie Aug 2013

The Modern Athenians: The Edinburgh Review In The Knowledge Economy Of The Early Nineteenth Century, William Christie

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the role of intellectual periodicals, specifically the edinburgh Review, in creating and representing the interdisciplinary knowledge economy of early 19th century Edinburgh, and proposes the term "the Periodical Enlightenment" to represent this distinctive phase in Scottish culture.


"And The Roadside Fire": Portrayals Of Home Through National Song In Stevenson's Scottish Adventures, Christy Danelle Di Frances Aug 2013

"And The Roadside Fire": Portrayals Of Home Through National Song In Stevenson's Scottish Adventures, Christy Danelle Di Frances

Studies in Scottish Literature

This article considers allusions to popular Scottish song in Stevenson’s work, especially in Kidnapped, to interrogate Stevenson’s broader configuration of home, as both personal and engaged with the Scottish national consciousness, exploring how he preserves home within his modern adventure aesthetic through reference to popular Scottish song, ballads and folk songs.


The Missing Manuscript Of Robert Burns's "Patriarch" Letter, Gerard Carruthers, Pauline Mackay Aug 2013

The Missing Manuscript Of Robert Burns's "Patriarch" Letter, Gerard Carruthers, Pauline Mackay

Studies in Scottish Literature

Reports the discovery of a previously-lost early transcription of a Burns letter, held by a private owner in Dumfries, records its textual variants, and discusses its relation to the previously-known versions on which editors have had to rely.


Court Poetry In Late Medieval England And Scotland, By Anthony Hasler, Holly A. Crocker Aug 2013

Court Poetry In Late Medieval England And Scotland, By Anthony Hasler, Holly A. Crocker

Studies in Scottish Literature

Review of Court Poetry in Late Medieval England and Scotland, by Anthony Hasler.


Robert Burns, James Johnson, And The Manuscript Of "The German Lairdie", Patrick G. Scott Aug 2013

Robert Burns, James Johnson, And The Manuscript Of "The German Lairdie", Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Reports, illustrates, and assesses a fragment of manuscript music now in the G. Ross Roy Collection at the University of South Carolina, for Burns's song "The German Lairdie," headed in Burns's hand, and possibly with the music in his hand also. A note with the fragment, which was exhibited as Burns's autograph in 1896, states that it had been sent by Burns to the Edinburgh editor and publisher James Johnson, for inclusion in his Scots Musical Museum.


A "Quarrell Sett Out In Metre": Towards A New Edition Of Scottish Reformation Satirical Literature, Tricia A. Mcelroy Aug 2013

A "Quarrell Sett Out In Metre": Towards A New Edition Of Scottish Reformation Satirical Literature, Tricia A. Mcelroy

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the issues of definition and genre in preparing a new edition for the Scottish Text Society of satirical poems (and prose) from the Scottish Reformation period, and also comments on decisions about editing Scottish Renaissance manuscript poetry.


Contributors To Ssl 39 Aug 2013

Contributors To Ssl 39

Studies in Scottish Literature

No abstract provided.


Sir Walter Scott And John Clare: An Unpublished Letter, Ian D. Kane Aug 2013

Sir Walter Scott And John Clare: An Unpublished Letter, Ian D. Kane

Studies in Scottish Literature

Reports an autograph letter written by Walter Scott, now in the G. Ross Roy Collection at the University of South Carolina, dated May 31, 1820, and sent to Captain Markham Shirwill, responding to Shirwill's request that Scott foster Clare's writing career; along with a transcription and illustration of the letter, the note discusses what was previously known about this incident and its context based on the letters of Clare.


Prelims, Prefatory Note To Ssl 37, Preface To Robert Burns & Friends, Patrick G. Scott, Anthony Jarrells, Kenneth G. Simpson Jul 2013

Prelims, Prefatory Note To Ssl 37, Preface To Robert Burns & Friends, Patrick G. Scott, Anthony Jarrells, Kenneth G. Simpson

Studies in Scottish Literature

Prefatory note by Patrick Scott and Tony Jarrells, preface by Patrick Scott and Kenneth Simpson


Footnoted Folklore: Robert Burns's "Hallowe'en", Corey E. Andrews Jul 2013

Footnoted Folklore: Robert Burns's "Hallowe'en", Corey E. Andrews

Studies in Scottish Literature

Examines Robert Burns's poem "Hallowe'en," first published in the Kilmarnock edition (1786), both in relation to its background in Scottish folklore and in terms of the way Burns presented it on the page, with numerous footnotes, arguing that "throughout the poem Burns acts as a participant observer in the classic anthropological sense."