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Oldbuck And Ochiltree: Scott, History, And The Antiquary’S Doppelgänger, John Williams Dec 2019

Oldbuck And Ochiltree: Scott, History, And The Antiquary’S Doppelgänger, John Williams

Studies in Scottish Literature

Argues that, in The Antiquary, Scott creatively explores and reworks earlier literary forms, particularly Shakespearean and Gothic tropes (double identity, hero/anti-hero, tainted familial relationships, shape-shifting), injecting a note of sober realism into Romantic self-indulgence, and contributing significantly to the evolution of subsequent European literary culture, just as his own work was reworked by others.


The Chartist Robin Hood: Thomas Miller’S Royston Gower; Or, The Days Of King John (1838), Stephen Basdeo Dec 2019

The Chartist Robin Hood: Thomas Miller’S Royston Gower; Or, The Days Of King John (1838), Stephen Basdeo

Studies in Scottish Literature

Walter Scott's reinvention in Ivanhoe (1819) of Robin Hood as an Anglo-Saxon freedom fihghter had a lasting impact on later portrayal's of the outlaw. Thomas Miller's novel Royston Gower (1838) reworks Scott's idea of racial conflict between Saxons and Normans to cast Robin Hood as a Saxon freedom fighter to serve the Chartist cause. Where Scott’s portrayal served a conservative agenda of reconciliation, leading to one nation under a just and benevolent king, Miller draws parallels between Norman oppressors and the early Victorian political elite, between Saxon poverty and 19th century hunger, and between ...


Flora Annie Steel: The Walter Scott Of The Punjab?, Juliet Shields Dec 2019

Flora Annie Steel: The Walter Scott Of The Punjab?, Juliet Shields

Studies in Scottish Literature

Suggests that Flora Ann Steel Steel’s late Victorian historical novels about India, usually discussed in terms of gender, race, or postcolonial criticism, are more usefully compared to Walter Scott than to Rudyard Kipling, arguing that Steel's novels, like Scott’s about Scotland, formalize an understanding of historical change that derives from the Scottish Enlightenment.


‘...Arranged In A Fanciful Manner And In An Ancient Style’: The First Scenic Realisations Of Scott’S Work And The Desire For A New “Realism” On Scottish Stages, Barbara Bell Dec 2019

‘...Arranged In A Fanciful Manner And In An Ancient Style’: The First Scenic Realisations Of Scott’S Work And The Desire For A New “Realism” On Scottish Stages, Barbara Bell

Studies in Scottish Literature

An illustrated essay examining the stage design and scenery in early dramatizations of Scott's fiction, specifically the designs by Alexander Nasmyth for versions of Scott's stage adaptations of Scott's The Heart of Mid-Lothian, in London in 1819 and in Edinburgh in 1820, arguing that the rise of scenic realism strengthened the relationship between the theatre and the broader population.


Twilight Histories: The Waverley Novels And George Eliot’S Fictions Of The Recent Past, Camilla Cassidy Dec 2018

Twilight Histories: The Waverley Novels And George Eliot’S Fictions Of The Recent Past, Camilla Cassidy

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the influence of Scott's Waverley novels on George Eliot, as novels set in recent history, drawing on Eric Hobsbawm's idea of a "twilight zone between history and memory" to examine Eliot's Adam Bede and The Mill on the Floss, and to argue that Eliot in reworking Scott's reimagining of this recent-historical "time-lapse" articulates a psychological experience of historical transition and modernisation.


Preface To Ssl 44.2, Tony Jarrells, Patrick Scott Dec 2018

Preface To Ssl 44.2, Tony Jarrells, Patrick Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

A brief introduction to this special issue, including reference to earlier contributions on the topic in this journal.


Walter Scott And Comics, Christopher Murray Dec 2018

Walter Scott And Comics, Christopher Murray

Studies in Scottish Literature

A wide-ranging survey of the reworking of Scot's novels (and narrative poems) in comic form, in the US and UK.


Contributors To Ssl 44.2 Dec 2018

Contributors To Ssl 44.2

Studies in Scottish Literature

No abstract provided.


‘Such Editorial Liberties’: Scott And The Textual Afterlives Of Thomas The Rhymer, David Selfe Dec 2018

‘Such Editorial Liberties’: Scott And The Textual Afterlives Of Thomas The Rhymer, David Selfe

Studies in Scottish Literature

This essay discusses from his Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border (1802 etc) Walter Scott's version of the ballad "Thomas the Rhymer" (or "True Thomas") tracing the ballad's history within the social context of its reception, and then comparing Scott’s version with the orally-transmitted version "Thomas Rhymer and the Queen of Elfland",written down by Anna Gordon Brown in 1800, for differences both in wording and in punctuation choices as the “apologetic apostrophe,” to suggest how such textual traces show the changing relationship between textual form and textual function. [essay still in final proof stage]


‘A’ That’S Past Forget – Forgie’: National Drama And The Construction Of Scottish National Identity On The Nineteenth-Century Stage, Paula Sledzinska Dec 2018

‘A’ That’S Past Forget – Forgie’: National Drama And The Construction Of Scottish National Identity On The Nineteenth-Century Stage, Paula Sledzinska

Studies in Scottish Literature

Focused on dramatic adaptations of Walter Scott’s Rob Roy and Waverley for the Theatre Royal, Edinburgh, by Isaac Pocock and John W. Calcraft, this essay explores "how the conflicted Lowland and Highland traditions became incorporated into the new image of the nation," offering "a theatrical reflection of the dynamic process of identity building in the nineteenth-century Scotland."


Claimed By The Stage: Popular Dramatization And The Legacy Of The Lady Of The Lake, Mary Nestor Dec 2018

Claimed By The Stage: Popular Dramatization And The Legacy Of The Lady Of The Lake, Mary Nestor

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses three stage adaptations of Scott's poem The Lady of the Lake, by Thomas Dibdin for the Surrey Theatre, London, John Edmund Eyre, for the Theatre Royal, Edinburgh, and Thomas Morton for Covent Garden, arguing that these popular melodramas shaped popular perception of how Scott's poem engaged the Highland landscape.

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Amédée Pichot And Walter Scott’S Parrot: A Fabulous Tale Of Parroting And Pirating, Céline Sabiron Dec 2018

Amédée Pichot And Walter Scott’S Parrot: A Fabulous Tale Of Parroting And Pirating, Céline Sabiron

Studies in Scottish Literature

Describes the background and origin of Le perroquet de Walter Scott (Paris, 1834), by the French writer and translator Amédée Pichot, who had visited Scott (and Scott's home at Abbotsford) in 1822, discussing the complex interrelationship in Pichot's work between parody, translation, and piracy, and also considering more briefly Pichot's work as anticipating the better-known parrots in Flaubert and Julian Barnes.


Croftangry’S Castle And The House Of Usher: Scott, Poe, And ‘Decayed And Lingering Exotics’, George S. Williams Dec 2018

Croftangry’S Castle And The House Of Usher: Scott, Poe, And ‘Decayed And Lingering Exotics’, George S. Williams

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses Poe's reading of Walter Scott, specifically through parallels of plot, setting, phrasing and imagery, between Scott's Chronicles of the Canongate, 1st series (1827) and Poe's short story "The Fall of the House of Usher" (1839), arguing that the two works share psychological preoccupations, also present more widely in the prose works of the writers.


Afterword: New Reworkings Of Walter Scott From Dundee Comics Creative Space, Christopher Murray Dec 2018

Afterword: New Reworkings Of Walter Scott From Dundee Comics Creative Space, Christopher Murray

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses and illustrates a variety of approaches to the reworking of Scott novels by artists working in the Dundee Comics Creative Space, as developed for a sampler publication published by UniVerse Comics (2017), in connection with the Reworking Walter Scott project


Allegories Of The Heart, Fiona Robertson Dec 2018

Allegories Of The Heart, Fiona Robertson

Studies in Scottish Literature

"Allegories of the Heart" uses allegory (or "telling otherwise") as a means of investigating Scott’s presence in literary works which do not specifically adapt or rework his texts, arguing that this is an underexplored area of imaginative and figurative engagement with Scott’s work. Key texts are The Heart of Mid-Lothian, The Monastery, and Hawthorne’s fictions "Earth’s Holocaust" and The Scarlet Letter.


'Poetry That Does Not Die': Andrew Lang And Walter Scott’S 'Immortal' Antiquarianism, Lucy Wood Dec 2018

'Poetry That Does Not Die': Andrew Lang And Walter Scott’S 'Immortal' Antiquarianism, Lucy Wood

Studies in Scottish Literature

The late 19th century essayist Andrew Lang, born in the Scottish borders, shared with Walter Scott a passionate devotion for the Borders landscape, mapped and mediated by Scott’s fictions; in his introductions to the Border Edition of Scott's novels, Lang argued that, by “immortalising” national antiquities, Scott ensured that Scotland's geographical and architectural heritage would be preserved.


Introduction: Reworking Walter Scott, Daniel Cook, Lucy Wood Dec 2018

Introduction: Reworking Walter Scott, Daniel Cook, Lucy Wood

Studies in Scottish Literature

An overview of Walter Scott's contemporary celebrity and evolving reputation, of scholarship on his afterlives, of the way his work has been reshaped in a variety of settings and media, and of the essays collected in this special issue.


Preface To Ssl 44.1, Patrick G. Scott, Tony Jarrells Dec 2018

Preface To Ssl 44.1, Patrick G. Scott, Tony Jarrells

Studies in Scottish Literature

Brief introductory comments on the inclusion of comparative studies in Studies in Scottish Literature, and, through a reference to G.S. Fraser's poem "Meditation of a Patriot" (1944), on how perspectives on Scottish-Russian literary interrelationships changed from the 19th to the 20th centuries.


From Meyerhold And Blue Blouse To Mcgrath And 7:84: Political Theatre In Russia And Scotland, Rania Karoula Dec 2018

From Meyerhold And Blue Blouse To Mcgrath And 7:84: Political Theatre In Russia And Scotland, Rania Karoula

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the 1920s Russian political theatre movement Blue Blouse, as seen in 1926 by the American Hallie Flanagan (later director of the Federal Theatre Project), the Scottish radical theatre group 7:84, the Scottish company's successful Russian tour in 1982, and parallels between the two in approach and staging as analysed by 7:84's John McGrath.


Scottish Demotics And Russian Soul: Liz Lochhead’S Adaptation Of Chekhov's Three Sisters, Ksenija Horvat Dec 2018

Scottish Demotics And Russian Soul: Liz Lochhead’S Adaptation Of Chekhov's Three Sisters, Ksenija Horvat

Studies in Scottish Literature

Explores theatrical issues and theoretical approaches to translating, adapting and staging Chekhov's classic play Three Sisters, through adaptations by the Irish playwright Brian Friel and (briefly) the Scot John Byrne, and then discusses more fully the adaptation by Liz Lochhead, premiered at the Royal Lyceum Theatre, Edinburgh, in 2000.


‘The Shadow And The Law’: Stevenson, Nabokov And Dostoevsky, Rose France Dec 2018

‘The Shadow And The Law’: Stevenson, Nabokov And Dostoevsky, Rose France

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses Vladimir Nabokov's comments in lectures at Cornell praising Robert Louis Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde while condemning Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, and compares the two novels' treatment of the double in their central character with Nabokov's Humbert Humbert in Lolita.


Contributors To Ssl 44.1 Dec 2018

Contributors To Ssl 44.1

Studies in Scottish Literature

No abstract provided.


'Like Pushkin, I': Hugh Macdiarmid And Russia, Patrick Crotty Dec 2018

'Like Pushkin, I': Hugh Macdiarmid And Russia, Patrick Crotty

Studies in Scottish Literature

A detailed discussion of the poetic development of the Scottish poet Hugh MacDiamid (1892-1978), drawing on research for the forthcoming Complete Collected Poems of Hugh MacDiarmid to chart the changing ways in which he encountered, read, and responded to Russian writing, philosophy and culture in different phases of his career.


Introduction: Scotland And Russia Since 1900, Anna Vaninskaya Dec 2018

Introduction: Scotland And Russia Since 1900, Anna Vaninskaya

Studies in Scottish Literature

Introduces the project "Scottish-Russian Cultural Relations since 1900," based at the University of Edinburgh, the series of related symposia in Edinburgh, Dundee and Aberdeen, and its extensive web-site of translations and other resources, and provides a brief narrative of cultural interactions between Scotland and Russia in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including such key examples as the Russian presence at the Glasgow International Exhibition of 1901, Korney Chukovsky's account of visiting Scottish troops in 1916, and the the Scotland-USSR Society's welcome to the Russian Burns translator Samuil Marshak and Burns biographer Anna Elistratova during the International Burns Festival ...


Translations Of Robert Burns In The Russian Book Market: The Old And The New, Natalia Kaloh Vid Dec 2018

Translations Of Robert Burns In The Russian Book Market: The Old And The New, Natalia Kaloh Vid

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the influence of Samuil Marshak's long-dominant Russian translations of Robert Burns's poems and the more recent anthologies and translations that "broke the Marshak monopoly," and briefly examines why, in publishing terms, the Marshak translations are still the most widely available.


The Crème De La Crème: Old Favourites, New-Fangled Works, And Other Fictions, Willy Maley Dec 2017

The Crème De La Crème: Old Favourites, New-Fangled Works, And Other Fictions, Willy Maley

Studies in Scottish Literature

Introduces the SSL Debate, in which 18 contributors react to and add to the BBC Scotland poll on Scotland's Favourite Novel, discussing the purposes and limitations of various lists that have ranked recent Scottish fiction, and commenting briefly on the differences between this debate and the deliberations of a selection panel.


A New Dimension Of Scottishness? Iain Banks, The Algebraist (2004), Martin Procházka Dec 2017

A New Dimension Of Scottishness? Iain Banks, The Algebraist (2004), Martin Procházka

Studies in Scottish Literature

Argues that Iain Banks's experimental science fiction, often disguised as the pop-culture genre of “space opera,” changes the frame of reference for Scottishness, linking it with a plurality of fictitious worlds, presenting the gradual erosion, subversion and deconstruction of the anthropomorphic perspective, to reveal the limitations of humanist ideologies.


Venturing A Little Further: Margaret Elphinstone, The Sea Road (2000), Matthew Wickman Dec 2017

Venturing A Little Further: Margaret Elphinstone, The Sea Road (2000), Matthew Wickman

Studies in Scottish Literature

Proposes that Margaret Elphinstone’s historical novel about Gudrid of Iceland, an eleventh-century female explorer of Greenland and North America, is "a novel for many seasons: the eleventh century, the early and late twentieth, and far into the twenty-first," judging it "one of the great Scottish novels about the unknown," and "perhaps the nation’s greatest contribution to the modern zeitgeist."


Fresh Air: Michel Faber, Under The Skin (2000) With A Comment On Trainspotting, Tony Jarrells Dec 2017

Fresh Air: Michel Faber, Under The Skin (2000) With A Comment On Trainspotting, Tony Jarrells

Studies in Scottish Literature

Comparing Faber's treatment of the Scottish Highlands (his only novel set in Scotland) with a Highland incident in Welsh's Trainspotting, arguing that in Faber the Highlands are "not merely some representation of a romanticized past," but also "represent this present moment,... marked by the class conflicts and near political hopelessness" seen in Welsh, but also "a strong sense of beauty and an appreciation for the environment."


Eric Linklater, Private Angelo (1946), Gill Plain Dec 2017

Eric Linklater, Private Angelo (1946), Gill Plain

Studies in Scottish Literature

Recommends Linklater's novel about World War II in Italy as "a book that cherishes national difference while utterly condemning nationalism," "as much a book for 2017 as it was for 1946," and "a sharply observant satire dissecting the male vanity, national hubris and hypocrisy behind the 'logic' of war."