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'Poetry That Does Not Die': Andrew Lang And Walter Scott’S 'Immortal' Antiquarianism, Lucy Wood Dec 2018

'Poetry That Does Not Die': Andrew Lang And Walter Scott’S 'Immortal' Antiquarianism, Lucy Wood

Studies in Scottish Literature

The late 19th century essayist Andrew Lang, born in the Scottish borders, shared with Walter Scott a passionate devotion for the Borders landscape, mapped and mediated by Scott’s fictions; in his introductions to the Border Edition of Scott's novels, Lang argued that, by “immortalising” national antiquities, Scott ensured that Scotland's geographical and architectural heritage would be preserved.


'Upon The Decaying Kirk': A Footnote To Ane Dialogue, Jamie Reid Baxter Dec 2017

'Upon The Decaying Kirk': A Footnote To Ane Dialogue, Jamie Reid Baxter

Studies in Scottish Literature

Prints a short Scottish verse-fragment from the 1630s, "Upon the Decaying Kirk," and discusses its relation to an earlier, longer workAne Dialogue (1619: see SSL 43:1) and to presbyterian protests in the Edinburgh High Kirk against the introduction of episcopalianism under King Charles I.


Posthumous Preaching: James Melville's Ghostly Advice In Ane Dialogue (1619), With An Edition From The Manuscript, Jamie Reid Baxter May 2017

Posthumous Preaching: James Melville's Ghostly Advice In Ane Dialogue (1619), With An Edition From The Manuscript, Jamie Reid Baxter

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the use of the dialogue in Renaissance Scotland, and explores the background, themes, and dramatic art of Ane Dialogue (1619), concerning the Five Articles of Perth (1618), and resistance to the church policies of King James VI & I; gives character-sketches of the four speakers, James Melville, William Balcanquhall, Archibald Johnstone, and John Smyth, and of their satiric target, the Edinburgh minister William Struthers; concludes by providing an annotated edition of the dialogue transcribed from the sole manuscript, National Library of Scotland, Wodrow Quarto LXXXIV, ff. 19-25.


'A Thin And Tattered Veil': Lewis Grassic Gibbon And The Church Of Scotland, Ian Campbell May 2017

'A Thin And Tattered Veil': Lewis Grassic Gibbon And The Church Of Scotland, Ian Campbell

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the changes in Scottish religious practice and adherence from just before the First World War, through to the early 1930s, through the representation of the Church of Scotland in Lewis Grassic Gibbon's Scots Quair trilogy: Sunset Song (1932), Cloud Howe (1933), and Grey Granite (1934), with briefer comment on other writings by the same author writing as J. L. Mitchell. and a final comparison between Gibbon's portrayal of religious change and that in an earlier Scottish novel, John Galt's Annals of the Parish(1821).


Topic Modeling And The Historical Geography Of Scotland, Michael Gavin, Eric Gidal Nov 2016

Topic Modeling And The Historical Geography Of Scotland, Michael Gavin, Eric Gidal

Studies in Scottish Literature

Presents selected findings from a larger project using topic modeling for clusters of keywords from a defined corpus of 18th and 19th century Scottish topographical sources (including the Old and New Statistical Surveys), linked to GIS mapping, to explore such topics as Scottish industry, transport, antiquities, print culture, and religion, with 10 maps included in the article text.


Scotland In European Perspective: The Mainz-Germersheim Conference Before The Referendum, Patrick G. Scott May 2016

Scotland In European Perspective: The Mainz-Germersheim Conference Before The Referendum, Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Reviews the published papers on political, literary, and cultural aspects of Scottish cultural identity from a conference held at Johnannes Gutenberg University-Mainz at Germersheim, Germany, in October 2013, before the narrowly-unsuccessful Scottish Independence referendum of the following year ["Indyref"], and discusses their continuing relevance in Scottish attitudes to the upcoming United Kingdom referendum on British withdrawal from the European Union ["Brexit"].


Adam Smith For Our Time, I: Necroeconomics, Patrick G. Scott May 2016

Adam Smith For Our Time, I: Necroeconomics, Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Reviews a wide-ranging new American study of the Scottish philosopher and economist Adam Smith (1723-1790), examining its treatment of Smith as critic and rhetorical theorist, as well as of his better-known writings on moral philosophy in his Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759) and economic theory in The Wealth of Nations (1776), and discusses briefly the value for Scottish cultural history of interpretative practices developed originally in other national traditions, concluding that the book is "important for scholars of 18th century Scottish literature... because it approaches Smith’s work through disciplinary practices that are common enough in other literary fields ...


Adam Smith For Our Times, Ii: Of Sympathy And Selfishness, Michael Gavin Mar 2016

Adam Smith For Our Times, Ii: Of Sympathy And Selfishness, Michael Gavin

Studies in Scottish Literature

Summarizes the published proceedings of a recent conference at Mercer University discussing the significance for 21st century America of the 18th century Scottish philosopher and economist Adam Smith, and offers a critical perspective.


Hamish Henderson And Nelson Mandela: Notes For “Rivonia”, Patrick G. Scott Nov 2014

Hamish Henderson And Nelson Mandela: Notes For “Rivonia”, Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Describes and reproduces manuscript notesin the G. Ross Roy Collection University of South Carolina Libraries, for the protest song "Rivonia" ("Free Mandela"), written by the Scottish poet, folklorist and folksinger Hamish Henderson (1919-2002) in 1963-64 in response to the trial of Nelson Mandela and other leaders of the African National Congress who had been arrested at Rivonia, South Africa and sentenced to life imprisonment on Robben Island; assesses the influence of Henderson's song, which was recorded in 1964 by the Corries Trio, and sung at the anti-apartheid protests at Murrayfield, Edinburgh, against the visit of the Springboks rugby team ...


Preventing Revolution: Cato Street, Bonnymuir, And Cathkin, John Gardner Aug 2013

Preventing Revolution: Cato Street, Bonnymuir, And Cathkin, John Gardner

Studies in Scottish Literature

Argues, from a range of evidence including popular poetry and woodcuts, that popular risings in 1820 in Scotland, England, and Ireland were produced as a coordinated strategy by central government in the aftermath of Peterloo to instigate (through agents provocateurs) local popular uprisings and then brutally suppress them, with show trials and public executions, in order to deter or forestall larger social unrest or revolution.


"The Poor Man's Friend In Need": Baird, Burns And Miller, David Robb Aug 2012

"The Poor Man's Friend In Need": Baird, Burns And Miller, David Robb

Studies in Scottish Literature

Surveys the career of the Rev. George Baird (1761-1840), principal of the University of Edinburgh and minister of Edinburgh's High Kirk, assessing Baird's edition of the poems of Michael Bruce (1796), tracing his early encounter with the Scottish poet Robert Burns and his later connection with the self-educated Scottish writer and geologist Hugh Miller, and describing his efforts to relieve destitution and improve education in the west and north of Scotland and his extensive travels on behalf of the General Assembly's Highlands and Islands Committee.


A Ukranian Version Of Scotland's Liberator, Bruce, Wolodymyr T. Zyla Oct 1973

A Ukranian Version Of Scotland's Liberator, Bruce, Wolodymyr T. Zyla

Studies in Scottish Literature

No abstract provided.