Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Arts and Humanities Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

The W. Ormiston Roy Memorial Lecture: Who Wrote The Scots Musical Museum? Challenging Editorial Practice In The Presence Of Authorial Absence, Murray Pittock May 2016

The W. Ormiston Roy Memorial Lecture: Who Wrote The Scots Musical Museum? Challenging Editorial Practice In The Presence Of Authorial Absence, Murray Pittock

Studies in Scottish Literature

James Johnson’s Scots Musical Museum, published in six parts in Edinburgh over the period 1787-1803, is now inextricably linked to its greatest contributor, the poet, song-writer and song-collector Robert Burns. This lecture builds from Murray Pittock’s recent editorial work on Johnson’s collection, forthcoming in the new multivolume Oxford Edition of Robert Burns, based at the University of Glasgow. The lecture shows that the apparently-innocent question “Who wrote the Scots Musical Museum?” is a complex one, raising very fundamental questions about the nature of authorship and editorship in the necessarily collaborative and social enterprise of song publication, and ...


Robert Burns, James Johnson, And The Manuscript Of "The German Lairdie", Patrick G. Scott Aug 2013

Robert Burns, James Johnson, And The Manuscript Of "The German Lairdie", Patrick G. Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Reports, illustrates, and assesses a fragment of manuscript music now in the G. Ross Roy Collection at the University of South Carolina, for Burns's song "The German Lairdie," headed in Burns's hand, and possibly with the music in his hand also. A note with the fragment, which was exhibited as Burns's autograph in 1896, states that it had been sent by Burns to the Edinburgh editor and publisher James Johnson, for inclusion in his Scots Musical Museum.


On Editing The Merry Muses, Valentina Bold Aug 2012

On Editing The Merry Muses, Valentina Bold

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the sources and issues in reediting the late 18th century Scottish song collection, The Merry Muses of Caledonia (1799), in connection the 50th anniversary of the first modern scholarly edition, edited by Sydney Goodsir Smith, James Barke, and J. Delancey Ferguson in 1959.


On Translating Burns: A Heavenly Paradise And Two Versions Of "A Red, Red, Rose", Marco Fazzini Aug 2012

On Translating Burns: A Heavenly Paradise And Two Versions Of "A Red, Red, Rose", Marco Fazzini

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses, and prints, two different verse-translations from Scots into Italian of Robert Burns's well-known song "O, My Luve is Like a Red, Red, Rose," with brief comment on earlier Italian Burns translations. .


Back To Burns, Fred Freeman Aug 2012

Back To Burns, Fred Freeman

Studies in Scottish Literature

Argues that the published settings of the songs written and collected by the Scottish poet Robert Burns (1759-1796), especially the settings in George Thomson's series A Select Collection of Original Scottish Airs, conceal Burns's original intentions, and traces this to anti-Scottish critical prejudice that had driven the genuine folk tradition underground.


"O My Luve's Like A Red, Red Rose": Does Burns's Melody Really Matter, Kirsteen Mccue Aug 2012

"O My Luve's Like A Red, Red Rose": Does Burns's Melody Really Matter, Kirsteen Mccue

Studies in Scottish Literature

Examines the musical sources and later published settings for Robert Burns's song "O, my luve is like a red, red rose," with particular focus on Niel Gow's setting "Major Graham's Strathspey."