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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Scottish Demotics And Russian Soul: Liz Lochhead’S Adaptation Of Chekhov's Three Sisters, Ksenija Horvat Dec 2018

Scottish Demotics And Russian Soul: Liz Lochhead’S Adaptation Of Chekhov's Three Sisters, Ksenija Horvat

Studies in Scottish Literature

Explores theatrical issues and theoretical approaches to translating, adapting and staging Chekhov's classic play Three Sisters, through adaptations by the Irish playwright Brian Friel and (briefly) the Scot John Byrne, and then discusses more fully the adaptation by Liz Lochhead, premiered at the Royal Lyceum Theatre, Edinburgh, in 2000.


Immigrant Communities, Cultural Conflicts, And Intermarriage In Ann Marie Di Mambro's Tally's Blood, Ian Brown Dec 2017

Immigrant Communities, Cultural Conflicts, And Intermarriage In Ann Marie Di Mambro's Tally's Blood, Ian Brown

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the stage history, structure and themes of Anne Marie Di Mambro’s play Tally’s Blood (1990), especially in terms of the cultural stresses on Italian immigrant families in Scotland in the 1930s and the impact on them of the Second World War.


John Byrne's The Slab Boys: Technicolored Hell-Hole In A Town Called Malice, William Donaldson Dec 2015

John Byrne's The Slab Boys: Technicolored Hell-Hole In A Town Called Malice, William Donaldson

Studies in Scottish Literature

Presents a detailed discussion and appreciation of the Slab Boys tetralogy, a sequence of four plays by the Scottish playwright and painter John Byrne, beginning with The Slab Boys (1978), focused on a group of apprentices in the color-mixing room of a Paisley carpet-factory in the 1950s, and then tracing the divergence of their lives through three later plays, The Loveliest Night of the Year (1979, later titled Cuttin' A Rug), Still Life (1982), and Nova Scotia (2008); examines Byrne's characterization, "excoriatingly destructive wit," and "rambunctiously demotic language"; analyzes the tetralogy's continuing major themes of the relation between ...


Robert Burns As Dramatic Poet, R. D. S. Jack Aug 2012

Robert Burns As Dramatic Poet, R. D. S. Jack

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses Burns's skill in creating dramatic voice in his poetry, and what can be learned about the poems in their performance. Examples include "My luve is like a red, red rose," "John Anderson, my jo," "Robert Burns's March to Bannockburn," and "Tam o' Shanter."