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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Introduction: Spatial Humanities And Scottish Studies, Eric Gidal, Michael Gavin Nov 2016

Introduction: Spatial Humanities And Scottish Studies, Eric Gidal, Michael Gavin

Studies in Scottish Literature

Introduces the 2016 SSL Symposium on Spatial Humanities and Scottish Studies, reviewing recent discussion on the spatial understanding of Scottish history and culture and providing extensive references to relevant geographical and digital humanities scholarship.


Topic Modeling And The Historical Geography Of Scotland, Michael Gavin, Eric Gidal Nov 2016

Topic Modeling And The Historical Geography Of Scotland, Michael Gavin, Eric Gidal

Studies in Scottish Literature

Presents selected findings from a larger project using topic modeling for clusters of keywords from a defined corpus of 18th and 19th century Scottish topographical sources (including the Old and New Statistical Surveys), linked to GIS mapping, to explore such topics as Scottish industry, transport, antiquities, print culture, and religion, with 10 maps included in the article text.


Preface To Ssl 42:2, Patrick G. Scott, Tony Jarrells Nov 2016

Preface To Ssl 42:2, Patrick G. Scott, Tony Jarrells

Studies in Scottish Literature

Preface articulating the purpose of the SSL symposium series and the symposium on Spatial Humanities, and a brief introduction to the other articles in the issue.


Curious Travellers: Thomas Pennant And The Welsh And Scottish Tour (1760-1820), Alex Deans, Nigel Leask Nov 2016

Curious Travellers: Thomas Pennant And The Welsh And Scottish Tour (1760-1820), Alex Deans, Nigel Leask

Studies in Scottish Literature

Describes the digital mapping element in a collaborative AHRC-funded project Curious Travellers, that combines the editing and critical interpretation of early Romantic-period travel writing with cartographical work involving digitized historic maps, especially in the correspondence and manuscript and published travel journals of the Welsh naturalist Thomas Pennant (1726-1798), and provides examples of the issues involved in matching texts and maps, particularly for Gaelic place-names.


Contributors To Ssl 42:2 Nov 2016

Contributors To Ssl 42:2

Studies in Scottish Literature

Brief biographical notes on the literary scholars and digital humanists contributing to the volume.


Digital Literary Geography And The Difficulties Of Locating 'Redgauntlet Country', Christopher Donaldson, Sally Bushell, Ian N. Gregory, Joanna E. Taylor, Paul Rayson Nov 2016

Digital Literary Geography And The Difficulties Of Locating 'Redgauntlet Country', Christopher Donaldson, Sally Bushell, Ian N. Gregory, Joanna E. Taylor, Paul Rayson

Studies in Scottish Literature

Presents a case study about Sir Walter Scott's Jacobite novel Redgauntlet (1824), drawn from larger grant-funded projects in historical geographical information systems based at Lancaster University, reviewing a variety of other historic literary mapping projects, describing the text corpus of Lake District sources and models used in the larger projects, and contrasting the location of Scott's fictional geography and places in the Solway Firth area of South-West Scotland with the historic places, largely across the border in North-West England, to which he also refers.


Spatial Humanities And Memory Studies: Mapping Edinburgh In The First Age Of The Enlightenment, Murray Pittock, Craig Lamont Nov 2016

Spatial Humanities And Memory Studies: Mapping Edinburgh In The First Age Of The Enlightenment, Murray Pittock, Craig Lamont

Studies in Scottish Literature

Describes the first phase of a digital project mapping social and cultural relationships in early 18th century Edinburgh, Scotland, part of a larger AHRC grant-funded study Allan Ramsay and Edinburgh in the First Age of the Enlightenment; explores interrelations between urban history, digital mapping, and emerging interest in the field of memory studies; and suggests links between the heterogeneous and cosmopolitan nature of housing in early 18th century Edinburgh and the Scottish Enlightenment culture of innovation.