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Studies in Scottish Literature

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The Sunset Song Of Religion, Or, Have We Ever Been Post-Secular?, Matthew Wickman Dec 2020

The Sunset Song Of Religion, Or, Have We Ever Been Post-Secular?, Matthew Wickman

Studies in Scottish Literature

A discussion of the treatment and presence of religion in Sunset Song, the first novel in Lewis Grassic Gibbon's trilogy A Scots Quair, with some general reflections on religion and literature, and discussion of "post-secularity"


Introduction: A Glorious Phantom: Insurrections In Scottish Literature, Tony Jarrells Aug 2020

Introduction: A Glorious Phantom: Insurrections In Scottish Literature, Tony Jarrells

Studies in Scottish Literature

Introduces the SSL symposium on Insurrections by tracing themes from James Kelman's play Hardie and Baird: the Last Days (1978), about the Scottish Insurrection of 1820.


Paper Monuments: The Latin Elegies Of Thomas Chambers, Almoner To Cardinal Richelieu, Kelsey Jackson Williams Aug 2020

Paper Monuments: The Latin Elegies Of Thomas Chambers, Almoner To Cardinal Richelieu, Kelsey Jackson Williams

Studies in Scottish Literature

Examines the Latin poems by Thomas Chambers (or Chalmers), the younger, a well-connected mid-17th century Catholic priest who spent time in Rome and Scotland as well as in France, where he was almoner to Cardinal Richelieu, based on a manuscript collection of elegies Chalmers copied into George Strachan’s manuscript album amicorum, and on other elegies known from their use on monuments or tombs.


Performing Authenticity In The 19th-Century Short Story: Walter Benjamin, James Hogg, And The Spy, Duncan Hotchkiss Aug 2020

Performing Authenticity In The 19th-Century Short Story: Walter Benjamin, James Hogg, And The Spy, Duncan Hotchkiss

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses periodical short stories by the Scottish writer James Hogg (1770-1835), and his periodical The Spy, arguing that these textually perform oral story-telling features within the print medium, problematize Walter Benjamin’s distinction between traditional oral storytelling and the printed short story as vanguard of modernity, and show the periodical short story as a form embodies modernity while performing tradition.


Eadar Canaan Is Garrabost (Between Canaan And Garrabost): Religion In Derick Thomson’S Lewis Poetry, Petra Johana Poncarová Aug 2020

Eadar Canaan Is Garrabost (Between Canaan And Garrabost): Religion In Derick Thomson’S Lewis Poetry, Petra Johana Poncarová

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the treatment of religious belief in the Gaelic poetry of Derick Thomson (1921-2012), from the Outer Hebridean island of Lewis, off the northwest coast of Scotland, surveying Thomson's poems about his encounters with varieties of Presbyterianism, notably the Free Church, and exploring also nuances and religious allusions in poems about his own experience.


‘Yon High Mossy Mountains’: A Burns Song Manuscript From The Roy Collection, Patrick Scott Aug 2020

‘Yon High Mossy Mountains’: A Burns Song Manuscript From The Roy Collection, Patrick Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses and collates variants from a second autograph manuscript of Burns's song "Yon High..." or "Yon Wild Mossy Mountains," in the Roy Collection, University of South Carolina, reviewing the evidence on provenance, and assessing the purpose of the variants in the Roy manuscript.


The Reputation Of David Gray, David Mcvey Aug 2020

The Reputation Of David Gray, David Mcvey

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses responses to the poetry, including the death, of the Scottish poet David Gray (1838-1861), primarily with reference to his longer poem The Luggie and his sonnet sequence In The Shadows, exploring the extent to which Gray himself consciously constructed a reputation around his own imminent death from TB, through reference to the career and death of earlier sufferers, including Michael Bruce, Robert Pollock, and John Keats.


Contributors To Ssl 46.1 Aug 2020

Contributors To Ssl 46.1

Studies in Scottish Literature

Brief biographical notes on contributors to SSL 46.1.


Books Noted And Received, Patrick Scott Aug 2020

Books Noted And Received, Patrick Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Shorter reviews and notices of recent books in Scottish literature and adjacent disciplines.


Preface To Ssl 46.1, Patrick Scott, Tony Jarrells Aug 2020

Preface To Ssl 46.1, Patrick Scott, Tony Jarrells

Studies in Scottish Literature

Introducing the issue, with brief tributes to three Scottish literature scholars who died in summer 2020: Colin Manlove, Aileen Christianson, and Douglas Gifford.


Debating Insurrection In Galt's Ringan Gilhaize, Padma Rangarajan Aug 2020

Debating Insurrection In Galt's Ringan Gilhaize, Padma Rangarajan

Studies in Scottish Literature

Argues that John Galt's novel Ringan Gilhaize (1823), answering Walter Scott's Old Mortality (1816), a counternarrative about the Scottish Covenanters, their defeat at Bothwell Brig (1679), and the history of the Presbyterian establishment in Scotland, attempts a delicate dialectic, less imitative homage to Scott than "winking ventriloquism," presenting three generations of filial and social history filtered through the perspective of a single, idiosyncratic narrative voice,


The King And The People In Burns And Lady Nairne, With A Coda On Jane Austen’S Favorite Burns Song, Carol Mcguirk Aug 2020

The King And The People In Burns And Lady Nairne, With A Coda On Jane Austen’S Favorite Burns Song, Carol Mcguirk

Studies in Scottish Literature

Explores the treatment of the monarchy, and the Jacobite song tradition, in Robert Burns (who "refuses political silence yet ... embraces indirection, even contradiction") and Caroline Oliphant, Lady Nairne (whose "lyrics highlight Scottish solidarity... offering her readers [and the performers of her songs] an immersion experience in being Jacobite"), with discussion also of Jane Austen's favourite Burns song "“Their Groves of Sweet Myrtle,” suggesting that this is echoed in Austen's Emma.


“Black Coat” Scottish Spies: Clerical Informers In 1820, John Gardner Aug 2020

“Black Coat” Scottish Spies: Clerical Informers In 1820, John Gardner

Studies in Scottish Literature

This essay reviews modern debate about the use of government spies during the Scottish risings of 1819-1820; discusses the reliability of contemporary sources identifying Scottish clergy as government agents (notably Peter Mackenzie's An Exposure of the Spy System Pursued in Glasgow, 1835); turns to poetry from the period by Janet Hamilton and Alexander Rodger that insists that spies were used, including clergymen; and examines evidence of clerical espionage from the National Archives at Kew.


'You Must Fire On Them': Protest And Repression In Pulteneytown, Caithness, In 1847, James Hunter Aug 2020

'You Must Fire On Them': Protest And Repression In Pulteneytown, Caithness, In 1847, James Hunter

Studies in Scottish Literature

Examines based on contemporary accounts the protests in the small coastal town Pulteneytown, Caithness, on Wednesday, 24 February, 1847, against the export of grain; the circumstances in which a small detachment from the British Army’s 76th Regiment opened fire on the protesters; and local and London newspaper comments about the confrontation and the military response.


Joe Corrie’S In Time O’ Strife, The General Strike Of 1926, And The Impasse Of Insurgent Masculinity, Paul Malgrati Aug 2020

Joe Corrie’S In Time O’ Strife, The General Strike Of 1926, And The Impasse Of Insurgent Masculinity, Paul Malgrati

Studies in Scottish Literature

Examines the ex-miner and labour journalist Joe Corrie's three-act play In Time o’ Strife, set in West Fife ("the most significant working-class play written about the 1926 General Strike"), setting it in the context of Corrie's writing career, and exploring the psychological, familial, and political conflicts, including conflicts of gender roles, which it dramatizes.


Afterword: 'A Wrong-Resenting People': Writing Insurrectionary Scotland, Christopher A. Whatley Aug 2020

Afterword: 'A Wrong-Resenting People': Writing Insurrectionary Scotland, Christopher A. Whatley

Studies in Scottish Literature

A broadranging review of "conflictual events" in Scottish history from the late 17th to the early 20th centuries, exploring attitudes towards protest or insurrection, both on the part of the protesters and of the local and central governmental authorities, arguing for the value of interdisciplinary research on the sources, and providing references for literary students to some of the relevant historical scholarship.


The Path To Quarry Wood: Nan Shepherd’S Short Fiction In Alma Mater, Graham Stephen Aug 2020

The Path To Quarry Wood: Nan Shepherd’S Short Fiction In Alma Mater, Graham Stephen

Studies in Scottish Literature

Explores the literary development of the Scottish novelist Nan Shepherd (1893-1981), in particular her path towards such novels as The Quarry Wood (1928), through her notebooks, correspondence, and early university writings, particularly in a series of overlooked short stories published in special annual charity numbers of Alma Mater, the University of Aberdeen’s student magazine.


Bliadhna Nan Caorach/The Year Of The Sheep: Reading Highland Protest In The 1790s, Alexander Dick Aug 2020

Bliadhna Nan Caorach/The Year Of The Sheep: Reading Highland Protest In The 1790s, Alexander Dick

Studies in Scottish Literature

Describes Bliadhna nan Caorach, the Year of the Sheep, in Ross-shire in the summer of 1792 when about 200 Highland farmers from Strathrusdale and other communities drove as many as 10,000 cheviot and blackface sheep toward Inverness to protest their intrusion on to Highland lands; discusses the difference between protest, riot, and insurrection; and examines a poetic response by Ailean Dughallach (Allan MacDougall) and two sympathetic prose reactions, by Anne Grant, of Laggan, and a touring English clergyman John Lettice (who attended the subsequent trials, but took some of his information from the Statistical Account).


Alasdair Gray (1934-2019), Patrick Scott Aug 2020

Alasdair Gray (1934-2019), Patrick Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

A short tribute to the Scottish artist and writer Alasdair Gray, his friendship with and portrait of G. Ross Roy, the illustrations he did for Studies in Scottish Literature, and other Gray drawings in the Roy Collection at the University of South Carolina.


Writing The Highland Tour: A Story Of A Deeply Troubling Kind, Andrew Hook Aug 2020

Writing The Highland Tour: A Story Of A Deeply Troubling Kind, Andrew Hook

Studies in Scottish Literature

Review and discussion of Nigel Leask, Stepping Westward: Writing the Highland Tour c.1720-1830 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020), from Burt and Pennant to Dr Johnson, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, and John Keats, praising the book as timely, and suggesting that in discussing attitudes to the people of the Scottish Highlands it tells "a story of a deeply troubling kind."


‘...Arranged In A Fanciful Manner And In An Ancient Style’: The First Scenic Realisations Of Scott’S Work And The Desire For A New “Realism” On Scottish Stages, Barbara Bell Dec 2019

‘...Arranged In A Fanciful Manner And In An Ancient Style’: The First Scenic Realisations Of Scott’S Work And The Desire For A New “Realism” On Scottish Stages, Barbara Bell

Studies in Scottish Literature

An illustrated essay examining the stage design and scenery in early dramatizations of Scott's fiction, specifically the designs by Alexander Nasmyth for versions of Scott's stage adaptations of Scott's The Heart of Mid-Lothian, in London in 1819 and in Edinburgh in 1820, arguing that the rise of scenic realism strengthened the relationship between the theatre and the broader population.


The Chartist Robin Hood: Thomas Miller’S Royston Gower; Or, The Days Of King John (1838), Stephen Basdeo Dec 2019

The Chartist Robin Hood: Thomas Miller’S Royston Gower; Or, The Days Of King John (1838), Stephen Basdeo

Studies in Scottish Literature

Walter Scott's reinvention in Ivanhoe (1819) of Robin Hood as an Anglo-Saxon freedom fihghter had a lasting impact on later portrayal's of the outlaw. Thomas Miller's novel Royston Gower (1838) reworks Scott's idea of racial conflict between Saxons and Normans to cast Robin Hood as a Saxon freedom fighter to serve the Chartist cause. Where Scott’s portrayal served a conservative agenda of reconciliation, leading to one nation under a just and benevolent king, Miller draws parallels between Norman oppressors and the early Victorian political elite, between Saxon poverty and 19th century hunger, and between ...


Oldbuck And Ochiltree: Scott, History, And The Antiquary’S Doppelgänger, John Williams Dec 2019

Oldbuck And Ochiltree: Scott, History, And The Antiquary’S Doppelgänger, John Williams

Studies in Scottish Literature

Argues that, in The Antiquary, Scott creatively explores and reworks earlier literary forms, particularly Shakespearean and Gothic tropes (double identity, hero/anti-hero, tainted familial relationships, shape-shifting), injecting a note of sober realism into Romantic self-indulgence, and contributing significantly to the evolution of subsequent European literary culture, just as his own work was reworked by others.


Flora Annie Steel: The Walter Scott Of The Punjab?, Juliet Shields Dec 2019

Flora Annie Steel: The Walter Scott Of The Punjab?, Juliet Shields

Studies in Scottish Literature

Suggests that Flora Ann Steel Steel’s late Victorian historical novels about India, usually discussed in terms of gender, race, or postcolonial criticism, are more usefully compared to Walter Scott than to Rudyard Kipling, arguing that Steel's novels, like Scott’s about Scotland, formalize an understanding of historical change that derives from the Scottish Enlightenment.


Hearing Competing Voices In James Robertson’S The Fanatic, Alison Jack Dec 2019

Hearing Competing Voices In James Robertson’S The Fanatic, Alison Jack

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses critical responses to James Robertson’s novels The Fanatic (2000) and The Testament of Gideon Mack (2006), and with particular reference to the character of John Lauder in The Fanatic, arguing that, rather than the political and psychological aspects represented by other characters, the religious perspective of Lauder offers a relevant creative alternative.


Afterword: Finding Religion In Scottish Literary History, Crawford Gribben Dec 2019

Afterword: Finding Religion In Scottish Literary History, Crawford Gribben

Studies in Scottish Literature

Looks back at the author's original article on the marginalization of Calvinist beliefs in earlier Scottish literature and comments on issues raised by the contributors to the SSL symposium.


‘Weill Auchtyn Eldris Exemplis Ws To Steir’: Aeneas And The Narrator In The Prologues To Gavin Douglas’S Eneados, P. J. Klemp Dec 2019

‘Weill Auchtyn Eldris Exemplis Ws To Steir’: Aeneas And The Narrator In The Prologues To Gavin Douglas’S Eneados, P. J. Klemp

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the translation of Virgil's Aeneid into Middle Scots by Gavin Douglas (1474-1522), the first translation of a major classical work into either Scots or English, analyzing the role of the narrator/translator in the prologues Douglas wrote, and arguing that by blurring the boundary between his own prefatory material and the Virgil text he was translating, Douglas brought the two elements into relationship to form a unified epic masterpiece.


The Poetry Of William Forbes Of Disblair (1661-1740), William Donaldson Dec 2019

The Poetry Of William Forbes Of Disblair (1661-1740), William Donaldson

Studies in Scottish Literature

Arguing that the early 18th century Scottish poet William Forbes has been given too little attention, introduces some of the issues in settling the canon of Forbes's work, and discusses both Forbes's anti-Union political poetry, notably The True Scots Genius, Reviving (1704), and A Pil for Pork-Eaters (1705), and his later dialogue on marriage, Xantippe: or the Scolding Wife (1724), an original development from a Latin dialogue by Erasmus. An appendix gives details of the eleven published poems attributable to Forbes.


‘I Am Just As Typically Scottish’: G.S. Fraser As Scottish Poet, Richie Mccaffery Dec 2019

‘I Am Just As Typically Scottish’: G.S. Fraser As Scottish Poet, Richie Mccaffery

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the poetry and poetic career of G. S. Fraser (1915-1980), both in the 1940s when he was regularly identified as a Scottish poet, and later in his life, arguing that the hostility of Scottish critics to his poetry in the 1950s (when he also built a substantial reputation as a London-based critic and reviewer) was unjustified, leading to the neglect of his substantial and continuing poetic achievement, and encouraging too narrow a definition of Scottish poetry.


The Roy Manuscript Of Burns’S 'To John Syme', Patrick Scott Dec 2019

The Roy Manuscript Of Burns’S 'To John Syme', Patrick Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Describes the only known authorial manuscript of a short poem by Robert Burns, now in the G. Ross Roy Collection at the University of South Carolina, providing a collation of variants among the early texts, and discussing the reliability of the transcripts of such Burns epigrams or versicles made by Burns's friend John Syme, on which editors must rely for other Burns items.