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Studies in Scottish Literature

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Translations Of Robert Burns In The Russian Book Market: The Old And The New, Natalia Kaloh Vid Dec 2018

Translations Of Robert Burns In The Russian Book Market: The Old And The New, Natalia Kaloh Vid

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the influence of Samuil Marshak's long-dominant Russian translations of Robert Burns's poems and the more recent anthologies and translations that "broke the Marshak monopoly," and briefly examines why, in publishing terms, the Marshak translations are still the most widely available.


From Meyerhold And Blue Blouse To Mcgrath And 7:84: Political Theatre In Russia And Scotland, Rania Karoula Dec 2018

From Meyerhold And Blue Blouse To Mcgrath And 7:84: Political Theatre In Russia And Scotland, Rania Karoula

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the 1920s Russian political theatre movement Blue Blouse, as seen in 1926 by the American Hallie Flanagan (later director of the Federal Theatre Project), the Scottish radical theatre group 7:84, the Scottish company's successful Russian tour in 1982, and parallels between the two in approach and staging as analysed by 7:84's John McGrath.


‘The Shadow And The Law’: Stevenson, Nabokov And Dostoevsky, Rose France Dec 2018

‘The Shadow And The Law’: Stevenson, Nabokov And Dostoevsky, Rose France

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses Vladimir Nabokov's comments in lectures at Cornell praising Robert Louis Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde while condemning Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, and compares the two novels' treatment of the double in their central character with Nabokov's Humbert Humbert in Lolita.


Introduction: Scotland And Russia Since 1900, Anna Vaninskaya Dec 2018

Introduction: Scotland And Russia Since 1900, Anna Vaninskaya

Studies in Scottish Literature

Introduces the project "Scottish-Russian Cultural Relations since 1900," based at the University of Edinburgh, the series of related symposia in Edinburgh, Dundee and Aberdeen, and its extensive web-site of translations and other resources, and provides a brief narrative of cultural interactions between Scotland and Russia in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including such key examples as the Russian presence at the Glasgow International Exhibition of 1901, Korney Chukovsky's account of visiting Scottish troops in 1916, and the the Scotland-USSR Society's welcome to the Russian Burns translator Samuil Marshak and Burns biographer Anna Elistratova during the International Burns Festival ...


'Like Pushkin, I': Hugh Macdiarmid And Russia, Patrick Crotty Dec 2018

'Like Pushkin, I': Hugh Macdiarmid And Russia, Patrick Crotty

Studies in Scottish Literature

A detailed discussion of the poetic development of the Scottish poet Hugh MacDiamid (1892-1978), drawing on research for the forthcoming Complete Collected Poems of Hugh MacDiarmid to chart the changing ways in which he encountered, read, and responded to Russian writing, philosophy and culture in different phases of his career.


Preface To Ssl 44.1, Patrick G. Scott, Tony Jarrells Dec 2018

Preface To Ssl 44.1, Patrick G. Scott, Tony Jarrells

Studies in Scottish Literature

Brief introductory comments on the inclusion of comparative studies in Studies in Scottish Literature, and, through a reference to G.S. Fraser's poem "Meditation of a Patriot" (1944), on how perspectives on Scottish-Russian literary interrelationships changed from the 19th to the 20th centuries.


Contributors To Ssl 44.1 Dec 2018

Contributors To Ssl 44.1

Studies in Scottish Literature

No abstract provided.


Scottish Demotics And Russian Soul: Liz Lochhead’S Adaptation Of Chekhov's Three Sisters, Ksenija Horvat Dec 2018

Scottish Demotics And Russian Soul: Liz Lochhead’S Adaptation Of Chekhov's Three Sisters, Ksenija Horvat

Studies in Scottish Literature

Explores theatrical issues and theoretical approaches to translating, adapting and staging Chekhov's classic play Three Sisters, through adaptations by the Irish playwright Brian Friel and (briefly) the Scot John Byrne, and then discusses more fully the adaptation by Liz Lochhead, premiered at the Royal Lyceum Theatre, Edinburgh, in 2000.


Scotland’S Top Ten & The Inadequacy Of A National Canon: Alasdair Gray’S Lanark (1981), Scott Lyall Dec 2017

Scotland’S Top Ten & The Inadequacy Of A National Canon: Alasdair Gray’S Lanark (1981), Scott Lyall

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the healthy overlap in the recent BBC Scotland poll on Scotland's Favourite Novel between popular appeal and critical recognition; judges Gray's Lanark as "Scotland's greatest modern novel," which "deserves to be much better known internationally," as "the outstanding postmodern challenge to the global conformism of capitalist hyper-individualism," laments that, despite their usefulness, such curated polls and lists are self-perpetuating, to the neglect of many distinctive Scottish novels, and concludes by asking "what would a truly uncurated top 30 look like?"


Writing On The Margins: Luke Sutherland, Venus As A Boy (2004), Manfred Malzahn Dec 2017

Writing On The Margins: Luke Sutherland, Venus As A Boy (2004), Manfred Malzahn

Studies in Scottish Literature

Recommends Sutherland's "epiphanic" short novel, which received rave reviews on publication, as a novel that should have been "an almost mandatory selection" for the BBC poll ballot, suggesting that it was excluded, not only because of length, explicit language, and violence, but because its island setting and depiction of "the fuzzy margins of sexual and racial identity" made it wrongly seem peripheral to the Scottish "mainland and mainstream."


'Not In Egerer'? (Some Of) What We Still Don't Know About Burns Bibliography, Patrick Scott Dec 2017

'Not In Egerer'? (Some Of) What We Still Don't Know About Burns Bibliography, Patrick Scott

Studies in Scottish Literature

Briefly reviews developments in Burns bibliography since J.W. Egerer's Bibliography of Robert Burns (1964), examines the kinds of material that Egerer aimed to include and exclude, and presents a series of brief case-studies illustrating the desirability of additional research, especially on early publication in non-book formats, for obtaining a fuller picture of Burns's textual history and readership.


Preface To Ssl 43:2, Patrick G. Scott, Anthony Jarrells Dec 2017

Preface To Ssl 43:2, Patrick G. Scott, Anthony Jarrells

Studies in Scottish Literature

Introduces the two special sections in this issue, on Scottish fiction and Burns bibliography, and briefly describes the range of other contributions, noting the wide international range of contributors.


Regaining Control: Jenni Fagan, The Panopticon (2012), Marie-Odile Pittin-Hedon Dec 2017

Regaining Control: Jenni Fagan, The Panopticon (2012), Marie-Odile Pittin-Hedon

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses Fagan's groundbreaking novel about an Edinburgh teenager as "an important landmark of contemporary literature," "a performative act of resistance ... over the forces of oppression," and "an invitation to reconsider the ethics of our contemporary world."


Eric Linklater, Private Angelo (1946), Gill Plain Dec 2017

Eric Linklater, Private Angelo (1946), Gill Plain

Studies in Scottish Literature

Recommends Linklater's novel about World War II in Italy as "a book that cherishes national difference while utterly condemning nationalism," "as much a book for 2017 as it was for 1946," and "a sharply observant satire dissecting the male vanity, national hubris and hypocrisy behind the 'logic' of war."


James Robertson, The Fanatic (2000), Silvia Mergenthal Dec 2017

James Robertson, The Fanatic (2000), Silvia Mergenthal

Studies in Scottish Literature

Suggests that Robertson's first novel, chiefly concerned with 17th century Scotland, already shows the complex intertextual relationships with earlier Scottish works by Scott, Hogg, and Stevenson that marks his subsequent writing, and comments particularly on its question "What happens later?," in relation to the Scottish vote for political devolution in May 1997.


Nan Shepherd, The Quarry Wood (1928), Carole Jones Dec 2017

Nan Shepherd, The Quarry Wood (1928), Carole Jones

Studies in Scottish Literature

Recommends Shepherd's novel about an independent woman in north-east Scotland as "vivid in delineating its female central character, its local language, and what is undoubtedly a radical engagement with sexual politics," that "examines closely issues of sexual identity and gender relations, and ... comes to its own thoughtful conclusions on women's place in the world."


Beattie's The Minstrel: A Missing Link In Scottish Poetry, Ian C. Robertson Dec 2017

Beattie's The Minstrel: A Missing Link In Scottish Poetry, Ian C. Robertson

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the Scottish poet James Beattie's poetry, especially his major work The Minstrel, and his shorter poem in Scots, "To Mr Alexander Ross," in terms of his connections, role and influence within the Scottish poetry and culture of the mid- to late 18th century, arguing that without taking into account Beattie's complex relationship to Scottish, and specifically Aberdonian, culture, the development of 18th century Scottish poetry between Ramsay and Burns cannot be adequately understood.


Immigrant Communities, Cultural Conflicts, And Intermarriage In Ann Marie Di Mambro's Tally's Blood, Ian Brown Dec 2017

Immigrant Communities, Cultural Conflicts, And Intermarriage In Ann Marie Di Mambro's Tally's Blood, Ian Brown

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the stage history, structure and themes of Anne Marie Di Mambro’s play Tally’s Blood (1990), especially in terms of the cultural stresses on Italian immigrant families in Scotland in the 1930s and the impact on them of the Second World War.


Towards A New Bibliography Of Robert Burns, Craig Lamont Dec 2017

Towards A New Bibliography Of Robert Burns, Craig Lamont

Studies in Scottish Literature

Introduces and describes the first phase of a new, free on-line resource from the University of Glasgow, A Bibliography of Robert Burns for the 21st Century: 1786-1802, based on fresh examination of multiple copies in several Scottish libraries, as well as in collections in the US and Canada, providing significantly-expanded entries for the early book-publication of Burns's poetry, and so allowing textual editors a more complete record of the textual history of Burns's work.


'Upon The Decaying Kirk': A Footnote To Ane Dialogue, Jamie Reid Baxter Dec 2017

'Upon The Decaying Kirk': A Footnote To Ane Dialogue, Jamie Reid Baxter

Studies in Scottish Literature

Prints a short Scottish verse-fragment from the 1630s, "Upon the Decaying Kirk," and discusses its relation to an earlier, longer workAne Dialogue (1619: see SSL 43:1) and to presbyterian protests in the Edinburgh High Kirk against the introduction of episcopalianism under King Charles I.


Digital Resources For Scottish Neo-Latin Literature, Ralph Mclean Dec 2017

Digital Resources For Scottish Neo-Latin Literature, Ralph Mclean

Studies in Scottish Literature

Provides an annotated guide to the Scottish neo-Latin texts and translations now available in two major digital projects, the Philological Museum (University of Birmingham) and Bridging the Continental Divide (University of Glasgow), with briefer notes on other related print and digital resources, commenting on the importance of fully-annotated editorial and translation projects now fewer students and researchers can tackle such texts in the original Latin.


Gaelic Scotland And Post-Colonial Readings, Carla Sassi Dec 2017

Gaelic Scotland And Post-Colonial Readings, Carla Sassi

Studies in Scottish Literature

A review of Silke Strohe's book Gaelic Scotland in the Colonial Imagination: Anglophone Writing from 1600 to 1900 (2017), setting it in the context of Strohe's earlier work on Gaelic literature in the same period and of developments in the post-colonial theory as applied in interdisciplinary Scottish studies.


Jackie Kay, Trumpet (1998), Marie Hologa Dec 2017

Jackie Kay, Trumpet (1998), Marie Hologa

Studies in Scottish Literature

Argues that Kay's acclaimed novel about a celebrated black jazz trumpeter, who is transgender, presents "an alternative construction of masculinity to the stereotypical Scottish 'hard man' of tartan noir, " dealing with "questions of identity that go beyond Scottishness," and unmasking "the emptiness of normative categories like gender, sexuality, ‘race’ and ethnic origins in a postmodern ... society."


The Scotch Bard And 'The Planting Line': New Documents On Burns And Jamaica, Clark Mcginn Dec 2017

The Scotch Bard And 'The Planting Line': New Documents On Burns And Jamaica, Clark Mcginn

Studies in Scottish Literature

Based on newly-identified documents, reexamines Burns's plan in 1786 to emigrate to Jamaica to take a job on a Scottish-owned slave plantation, and the timing and circumstances of his eventual decision to stay in Scotland, concluding that Burns "kept his options open to the last moment," and that the new documents might mean Burns "sought to prosper from chattel slavery," and "only dropped the opportunity because a better offer came along, not because of any moral scruples."


A New Dimension Of Scottishness? Iain Banks, The Algebraist (2004), Martin Procházka Dec 2017

A New Dimension Of Scottishness? Iain Banks, The Algebraist (2004), Martin Procházka

Studies in Scottish Literature

Argues that Iain Banks's experimental science fiction, often disguised as the pop-culture genre of “space opera,” changes the frame of reference for Scottishness, linking it with a plurality of fictitious worlds, presenting the gradual erosion, subversion and deconstruction of the anthropomorphic perspective, to reveal the limitations of humanist ideologies.


James Robertson, Joseph Knight (2003), Ilka Schwittlinsky Dec 2017

James Robertson, Joseph Knight (2003), Ilka Schwittlinsky

Studies in Scottish Literature

Recommends Robertson's novel, based on the true story of the Jamaican slave who in 1778 successfully asserted his freedom in the Scottish Court of Session, and the intertwined story of John Wedderburn, the Scottish plantation owner whose slave he had been, as "an eminently enjoyable historical novel which tackles a difficult subject matter [Scotland’s complicity in slavery and the slave trade] with astonishing humanity."


Muriel Spark, The Prime Of Miss Jean Brodie (1961), Katrin Berndt Dec 2017

Muriel Spark, The Prime Of Miss Jean Brodie (1961), Katrin Berndt

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses Spark's well-known novel, recognizing its "curious amalgamation of acerbic humour, elegance of style, Calvinist spirit, and careful poignancy of plot development," but pointing also to "the pleasurable challenge" offered by its "charismatic" protagonist, Jean Brodie, "glamorous and romantic," "with a proud self-assurance rarely bestowed on female characters," which nonetheless "eludes everyone’s emotional grasp."


Gavin Douglas's Aeneados: Caxton's English And 'Our Scottis Langage', Jacquelyn Hendricks Dec 2017

Gavin Douglas's Aeneados: Caxton's English And 'Our Scottis Langage', Jacquelyn Hendricks

Studies in Scottish Literature

Discusses the Scots poet Gavin Douglas's translation of Virgil's Aeneid into Scots, and Douglas's treatment of his predecessor William Caxton's translation of Virgil into English, arguing that Douglas associates Caxton's English with a barbaric world of monsters and beasts, in contrast to Scots which is seen as expressing civilized classical values, and that Douglas's translation, by enhancing and showcasing the literary power of Scots for a wider audience, successfully resisted for at least forty years the linguistic standardization initiated by the burgeoning print industry.


Venturing A Little Further: Margaret Elphinstone, The Sea Road (2000), Matthew Wickman Dec 2017

Venturing A Little Further: Margaret Elphinstone, The Sea Road (2000), Matthew Wickman

Studies in Scottish Literature

Proposes that Margaret Elphinstone’s historical novel about Gudrid of Iceland, an eleventh-century female explorer of Greenland and North America, is "a novel for many seasons: the eleventh century, the early and late twentieth, and far into the twenty-first," judging it "one of the great Scottish novels about the unknown," and "perhaps the nation’s greatest contribution to the modern zeitgeist."


Robin Jenkins, The Thistle And The Grail (1954) With A Comment On Sunset Song, David E. Latane Dec 2017

Robin Jenkins, The Thistle And The Grail (1954) With A Comment On Sunset Song, David E. Latane

Studies in Scottish Literature

Recommends Robin Jenkins's story of a Scottish football (soccer) team, Drumsagart Thistle, and its quest to win the Scottish Junior Cup, as "a marvelous compendium of Roy of the Rovers improbabilities, Our Town ethnography, critiques of gender relations, subtle and broad satire, and laugh outloud comedy."