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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Does Social Media Make Us More Or Less Lonely? Depends On How You Use It, Roger Patulny Jan 2020

Does Social Media Make Us More Or Less Lonely? Depends On How You Use It, Roger Patulny

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Humans are more connected to each other than ever, thanks to smartphones, the web and social media. At the same time, loneliness is a huge and growing social problem. Why is this so? Research shows social media use alone can't cure loneliness - but it can be a tool to build and strengthen our genuine connections with others, which are important for a happy life. To understand why this is the case, we need to understand more about loneliness, its harmful impact, and what this has to do with social media.


At A Performance Of The White Album, I Found The Community I Needed In A Time Of Crisis, Karen Cummings Jan 2020

At A Performance Of The White Album, I Found The Community I Needed In A Time Of Crisis, Karen Cummings

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Theatre can be many things. It can provide a catalyst to action, help us make sense of the world, make us feel part of a broader human experience. Sometimes, what happens on stage is the catalyst. Other times it happens because of the gathering theatre creates.


Miss Fisher And Her Fans: How A Heroine On Australia's Small Screen Became A Global Phenomenon, Sue Turnbull Jan 2020

Miss Fisher And Her Fans: How A Heroine On Australia's Small Screen Became A Global Phenomenon, Sue Turnbull

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

A heavily disguised Phryne (Essie Davis) is racing through the streets of Palestine, pursued by armed men. Excitement mounts. Having athletically eluded all attempts to capture her, Phryne sheds her indigo robes to emerge in a sparkling gold dress framed against the skyline like the superhero she has indubitably become.


Capitalized Money, Austerity And The Math Of Capitalism, Timothy Dimuzio, Richard Robbins Jan 2020

Capitalized Money, Austerity And The Math Of Capitalism, Timothy Dimuzio, Richard Robbins

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The Author(s) 2020. This article seeks to contribute to the existing critical debates on money and debt by advancing three main arguments. First, largely due to such debates' tendency for description, the article argues that in in the heterodox literature on money and debt there is no convincing critical theory of money creation. For this reason the authors introduce the theory of capital as power and how it can help us theorize the consequences of present money creation. Second, the authors demonstrate how the capitalization of money creation by a minority of investors not only leads to the political ...


Malnutrition In Rural Solomon Islands: An Analysis Of The Problem And Its Drivers, Joelle Albert, Jessica Bogard, Faye Siota, Joe Mccarter, Salome Diatalau, Josephine Maelaua, Thomas D. Brewer, Neil L. Andrew Jan 2020

Malnutrition In Rural Solomon Islands: An Analysis Of The Problem And Its Drivers, Joelle Albert, Jessica Bogard, Faye Siota, Joe Mccarter, Salome Diatalau, Josephine Maelaua, Thomas D. Brewer, Neil L. Andrew

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

2020 The Authors. Maternal & Child Nutrition published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Solomon Islands, like many Pacific Island nations, suffer from the burden of malnutrition. External drivers including population growth, declining agriculture and fisheries productivity and global food trade have contributed to the transition to greater reliance on imported foods. Globally, diets are recognized as both a cause of and solution to the burden of malnutrition. Using a mixed-method approach this study assessed nutritional status and key determinants of malnutrition among women and young children in rural Solomon Island communities. Quantitative 24-hour recall surveys identified diets of women and young children in these communities to be very limited in diversity. Typical daily diets comprised of fish, sweet potato (and/or rice) and slippery cabbage (a leafy green) usually boiled in coconut milk or baked. Participatory research using problem tree and biocultural approaches identified basic determinants of poor diets and opportunities to address these challenges. We highlight three domains of opportunity to improve diets across multiple scales; 1) improve nutrition-sensitive agriculture and fisheries to produce and distribute diverse, productive and nutrient rich foods; 2) nutrition education and empowerment, focusing on the first 1000 days of life, to influence and inform choices regarding food consumption; and 3) reducing the consumption of imported, energy-rich nutrient poor foods through national and regional policies. These multi-scale domains highlight that food system approaches that strengthen integrated policy and empower people are essential for healthy and sustainable diets in Solomon Islands and more broadly in the Pacific region.


Getting Creative With Less. Recipe Lessons From The Australian Women's Weekly During Wartime, Lauren Samuelsson Jan 2020

Getting Creative With Less. Recipe Lessons From The Australian Women's Weekly During Wartime, Lauren Samuelsson

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Over the past few weeks, Australians have become used to seeing empty shelves in their local supermarkets. Coronavirus-induced panic buying has quickly depleted stocks of products like pasta, rice and flour. Major supermarket chains Coles and Woolworths have introduced restrictions on the purchase of these staple ingredients. Coles has also introduced "rationing" of minced meats. While this is not a genuine food crisis, these limitations will lead Australians to ponder the culinary possibilities of their pantries. Looking at Australia's most widely read women's magazine, the Australian Women's Weekly, shows us how Australians have dealt with food shortages ...


Economic Cognitive Institutions, Enrico Petracca, Shaun Gallagher Jan 2020

Economic Cognitive Institutions, Enrico Petracca, Shaun Gallagher

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Copyright © Millennium Economics Ltd 2020. This paper introduces the notion of 'cognitive' institution and discusses its relevance to institutional economics. Cognitive institutions are conceptually founded on the philosophy of mind notion of extended mind, broadened to also include the distinctly social, institutional, and normative dimensions. Cognitive institutions are defined as institutions that not just allow agents to perform certain cognitive processes in the social domain but, more importantly, without which some of the agents' cognitive processes would not exist or even be possible. The externalist point of view of the extended mind has already had some influence in institutional economics ...


Great Time To Try: 5½ Ways To Make Movie Masterpieces At Home, Aaron L. Burton Jan 2020

Great Time To Try: 5½ Ways To Make Movie Masterpieces At Home, Aaron L. Burton

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Isolation is a common theme in cinema: stranded on an island (Cast Away), in space (Gravity or The Martian), on a boat (Life of Pi), stuck in the desert (127 hours), or simply confined to an apartment (Rear Window). But what about when the filmmakers themselves are stranded?


Killed In The Line Of Work Duties: We Need To Fix Dangerous Loopholes In Health And Safety Laws, Diana J. Kelly Jan 2019

Killed In The Line Of Work Duties: We Need To Fix Dangerous Loopholes In Health And Safety Laws, Diana J. Kelly

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

There is a pressing need to define employer responsibility when there is a "triangulated" employment relationship - such as between a worker, labour hire organisation and a host employer. This is an area where unions have rightly been calling for greater clarity and specificity.


Securing A Just Space For Small-Scale Fisheries In The Blue Economy, Philippa J. Cohen, Edward H. Allison, Neil L. Andrew, Joshua E. Cinner, Louisa S. Evans, Michael Fabinyi, Len R. Garces, Stephen J. Hall, Christina C. Hicks, Terry P. Hughes, Svein Jentoft, David J. Mills, Rosalie Masu, Emmanuel K. Mbaru, Blake D. Ratner Jan 2019

Securing A Just Space For Small-Scale Fisheries In The Blue Economy, Philippa J. Cohen, Edward H. Allison, Neil L. Andrew, Joshua E. Cinner, Louisa S. Evans, Michael Fabinyi, Len R. Garces, Stephen J. Hall, Christina C. Hicks, Terry P. Hughes, Svein Jentoft, David J. Mills, Rosalie Masu, Emmanuel K. Mbaru, Blake D. Ratner

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The vast developmental opportunities offered by the world's coasts and oceans have attracted the attention of governments, private enterprises, philanthropic organizations, and international conservation organizations. High-profile dialogue and policy decisions on the future of the ocean are informed largely by economic and ecological research. Key insights from the social sciences raise concerns for food and nutrition security, livelihoods and social justice, but these have yet to gain traction with investors and the policy discourse on transforming ocean governance. The largest group of ocean-users - women and men who service, fish and trade from small-scale fisheries (SSF) - argue that they have ...


The Impending Demise Of The Wto Appellate Body: From Centrepiece To Historical Relic?, Markus Wagner Jan 2019

The Impending Demise Of The Wto Appellate Body: From Centrepiece To Historical Relic?, Markus Wagner

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The current crisis engulfing the multilateral trading system has crystalized in the dispute over the (re-)appointment of the members of the World Trade Organization's Appellate Body. While the legislative arm of the organization has never lived up to its potential, its dispute settlement arm with the Appellate Body at its apex was seen as a lodestar for other international courts and tribunals. The United States has taken issue not only with individual decisions of the Appellate Body (as well as individual Appellate Body members), but with the institution as such. The article recounts the important institutional redesign that ...


Colonialism And Male Domestic Service Across The Asia Pacific, Julia T. Martinez, Claire K. Lowrie, Frances Steel, Victoria Haskins Jan 2019

Colonialism And Male Domestic Service Across The Asia Pacific, Julia T. Martinez, Claire K. Lowrie, Frances Steel, Victoria Haskins

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Examining the role of Asian and indigenous male servants across the Asia Pacific from the late-19th century to the 1930s, this study shows how their ubiquitous presence in these purportedly 'humble' jobs gave them a degree of cultural influence that has been largely overlooked in the literature on labour mobility in the age of empire. With case studies from British Hong Kong, Singapore, Northern Australia, Fiji and British Columbia, French Indochina, the American Philippines and the Dutch East Indies, the book delves into the intimate and often conflicted relationships between European and American colonists and their servants. It explores the ...


On The Margins, Rowan Cahill Jan 2019

On The Margins, Rowan Cahill

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

An overview of the work of Iain McIntyre, and a review of his anthology, On the Fly! Hobo Literature and Songs, 1879-1941.


Making States Accountable For Deliberate Forced Displacement, Philip C. Orchard Jan 2019

Making States Accountable For Deliberate Forced Displacement, Philip C. Orchard

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

How should we respond to states that deliberately displace their own populations? While the international refugee regime is anchored in the 1951 Refugee Convention and the work of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the Convention is silent on the question of state culpability, and the UNHCR's Statute established its entirely non-political character. Although rarely applied, four forms of complementary enforcement mechanisms already exist that could be used to limit and deter deliberate displacement by states: the UN Human Rights Council's Universal Periodic Review mechanism; soft and regional law, such as the UN Guiding Principles on ...


Over-The-Top Policing Of Bike Helmet Laws Targets Vulnerable Riders, Julia Quilter, Russell G. Hogg Jan 2019

Over-The-Top Policing Of Bike Helmet Laws Targets Vulnerable Riders, Julia Quilter, Russell G. Hogg

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Cycling is often held up as a model of healthy and sustainable urban transport. So why have bike laws become more, not less, draconian? Our ongoing research shows mandatory helmet laws have become a tool of disproportionate penalties and aggressive policing.


Exoticism Or Visceral Cosmopolitanism: Difference And Desire In Chinese Australian Women's Writing, Wenche Ommundsen Jan 2019

Exoticism Or Visceral Cosmopolitanism: Difference And Desire In Chinese Australian Women's Writing, Wenche Ommundsen

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In Visceral Cosmopolitanism, Mica Nava posits a positive and, by her own admission, utopian alternative to postcolonial readings of the sexualisation of difference: a cosmopolitanism located with the antiracist 'micro-narratives and encounters of the emotional, gendered and domestic everyday' (2007: 14). Olivia Khoo, in The Chinese Exotic, defines a new, diasporic Chineseness which 'conceives of women and femininity, not as the oppressed, but as forming part of the new visibility of Asia' (2007: 12). My reading of recent fiction by Chinese Australian women writers proposes to test these theories against more established models for understanding East/West intimate encounters such ...


Xenophobia Towards Asylum Seekers: A Survey Of Social Theories, Michelle A. Peterie, David A. Neil Jan 2019

Xenophobia Towards Asylum Seekers: A Survey Of Social Theories, Michelle A. Peterie, David A. Neil

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In recent decades, there has been a global rise in fear and hostility towards asylum seekers. Xenophobia - or 'fear of the stranger' - has become a pressing issue in a range of disciplines. Several causal models have been proposed to explain this fear and the hostility it produces. However, disciplinary boundaries have limited productive dialogue between these approaches. This article draws connections between four of the main theories that have been advanced in the existing literature: (1) false belief accounts, (2) xenophobia as new racism, (3) sociobiological explanations and (4) xenophobia as an effect of capitalist globalisation. While this article cannot ...


'Rock The Boat': Song-Writing As Geographical Practice, Leah Maree Gibbs, Kim Williams, Sarah Hamylton, Lucas M. Ihlein Jan 2019

'Rock The Boat': Song-Writing As Geographical Practice, Leah Maree Gibbs, Kim Williams, Sarah Hamylton, Lucas M. Ihlein

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Climate change science is unequivocal on the link between fossil fuels and climate change. Yet, some governments - including those in Australia - fail to meet agreed targets and continue to invest in the coal industry. Scientists and other scholars have expressed concern that the science is not prompting shifts in policy adequate to address current and future effects of climate change. Many have called for other tools - specifically, the arts and social sciences - to investigate and communicate about the environmental and social changes underway. In this context, this article explores the potential of interdisciplinary collaborative song-writing as research practice. Beginning on ...


Constructively Tough? Neither Side Has Committed To Fully Adopting Perhaps The Most Important Recommendation Of The Banking Royal Commission, Andrew D. Schmulow Jan 2019

Constructively Tough? Neither Side Has Committed To Fully Adopting Perhaps The Most Important Recommendation Of The Banking Royal Commission, Andrew D. Schmulow

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Among the many recommendations of the banking Royal Commission was a Board of Oversight for the two regulators in charge of financial institutions; the Australian Securities and Investments Commission and the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority: ASIC and APRA. Since then APRA’s own internal review conducted by deputy chairman John Lonsdale and NSW Supreme Court Judge Robert Austin, Australian Competition and Consumer Commission commissioner Sarah Court and UNSW professor Dimity Kingsford-Smith has found APRA to be soft on enforcement and timid by comparison to its international peers. Nonetheless, and to demonstrate that APRA still doesn’t get what it doesn ...


Conceptions Of Human Rights, David A. Neil Jan 2019

Conceptions Of Human Rights, David A. Neil

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This chapter considers moral realism, our capacity for moral judgment, the diversity of systems of moral belief, and the normative force of human rights. It argues that the justification of moral practice, as we ordinarily understand it, does not require belief in God. Indeed, in some areas of ethical theory, atheism has explanatory advantages over theism.


Dynamic Paths Of Innovation In Natural Resource Industries In Australia And Norway Since World War Two, Simon Ville, Olav Wicken, John Dean Jan 2019

Dynamic Paths Of Innovation In Natural Resource Industries In Australia And Norway Since World War Two, Simon Ville, Olav Wicken, John Dean

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This paper challenges Ed Barbier's influential contribution to the resources and economic development debate and extends our understanding of the process of resource-based development in two relevant economies since World War Two. We argue that: the expansion of resource-based industries remained a viable path of economic development in the 'contemporary era' since the 1950s; nations have modernised their economies while continuing to invest in resource industries; and innovation frontiers more than physical frontiers shaped the development of natural resource industries. We build our argument by providing a comparative study of two successful resource-based economies, Australia and Norway. Our focus ...


Consonant Deletion And Eastern Andalusian Spanish Vowels: The Effect Of Word-Final /S/, /R/ And /Θ/ Deletion On /I/, Alfredo Herrero De Haro Jan 2019

Consonant Deletion And Eastern Andalusian Spanish Vowels: The Effect Of Word-Final /S/, /R/ And /Θ/ Deletion On /I/, Alfredo Herrero De Haro

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Syllable-final consonant deletion has been widely documented in Eastern Andalusian Spanish, although the effects of consonant deletion on preceding vowels are still unknown. Studies analyzing syllable-final consonants in Eastern Andalusian Spanish have focused on /-s/, disregarding other consonants which are also deleted in this position. The present paper aims to extend this traditional focus by analyzing how /-s/, /-r/ and /-θ/ deletion affects preceding /i/. After analyzing 383 samples of /i/ word-finally and before underlying word-final /s/, /r/ and /θ/ in Western Almería (Eastern Andalusia), it is confirmed that the deletion of these three consonants changes the quality of preceding ...


Acting Oneself As Another: An Actor's Empathy For Her Character, Shaun Gallagher, Julia Gallagher Jan 2019

Acting Oneself As Another: An Actor's Empathy For Her Character, Shaun Gallagher, Julia Gallagher

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

What does it mean for an actor to empathize with the character she is playing? We review different theories of empathy and of acting. We then consider the notion of "twofoldness" (Wollheim), which has been used to characterize the observer or audience perspective on the relation between actor and character (Smith). This same kind of twofoldness or double attunement applies from the perspective of the actor herself who must, at certain points of preparation, distinguish between the character portrayed and her own portrayal effected in her craft. We argue that this concept helps us to understand how the actor can ...


A Global Review Of Farmers' Perceptions Of Agricultural Risks And Risk Management Strategies, Thi Tam Duong, Thomas D. Brewer, Jo Luck, Kerstin Zander Jan 2019

A Global Review Of Farmers' Perceptions Of Agricultural Risks And Risk Management Strategies, Thi Tam Duong, Thomas D. Brewer, Jo Luck, Kerstin Zander

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Farmers around the world face and manage a wide range of enterprise-related risks. These risks are increasing due to a range of factors including globalisation, increased trade in agricultural products, and climate change, jeopardising agricultural enterprises and forcing farmers to adjust their production and management strategies. Here we present results of a systematic literature review, following PRISMA protocol, of farmers' perceptions of, and responses to, agricultural risks. Using data reduction method (factor analysis) and descriptive statistics, we analysed 197 studies and found that weather-related risk (55%), biosecurity threats (48%), and human risk (35%) are the significant risks perceived by farmers ...


López Obrador Clashes With Courts After Vowing ‘Poverty’ For Mexican Government, Luis Gomez Romero Jan 2019

López Obrador Clashes With Courts After Vowing ‘Poverty’ For Mexican Government, Luis Gomez Romero

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Mexico's new president has reduced his own salary and demanded that all federal workers – including lawmakers and judges – take a massive pay cut, too. That may be illegal.


We're Not Seeing A 'Populist Surge' In This Election. Why Not?, Gregory C. Melleuish Jan 2019

We're Not Seeing A 'Populist Surge' In This Election. Why Not?, Gregory C. Melleuish

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

One of the most significant, and unremarked, features of the 2019 Australian federal election has been the absence of what might be termed a "populist surge".


It's All About The Sex, Or Is It? Humans, Horses And Temperament, Kate Fenner, Georgina Caspar, Michelle Hyde, Cathrynne Henshall, Navneet Dhand, Fiona S. Probyn-Rapsey, Katherine Dashper, Andrew Mclean, Paul Mcgreevy Jan 2019

It's All About The Sex, Or Is It? Humans, Horses And Temperament, Kate Fenner, Georgina Caspar, Michelle Hyde, Cathrynne Henshall, Navneet Dhand, Fiona S. Probyn-Rapsey, Katherine Dashper, Andrew Mclean, Paul Mcgreevy

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

We propose that the anthropomorphic application of gender stereotypes to animals influences human-animal interactions and human expectations, often with negative consequences for female animals. An online survey was conducted to explore riders' perceptions of horse temperament and suitability for ridden work, based on horse sex. The questionnaire asked respondents to allocate three hypothetical horses (a mare, gelding and stallion) to four riders compromising a woman, man, girl and boy. Riders were described as equally capable of riding each horse and each horse was described as suitable for all riders. Participants were also asked which horses (mares, geldings or stallions) were ...


South-South Cooperation In Southeast Asia: From Bandung And Solidarity To Norms And Rivalry, Susan N. Engel Jan 2019

South-South Cooperation In Southeast Asia: From Bandung And Solidarity To Norms And Rivalry, Susan N. Engel

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This article demonstrates how South-South Cooperation (SSC), as it is now constituted in Southeast Asia, is little more than a liberal norm retaining only echoes of its origins in the 1955 Bandung Conference that first created SSC based on solidarity, common interests, and sovereignty. Southeast Asia is a useful case study of SSC's evolution, as its states have been major players over the decades - with Indonesia proposing the Bandung Conference, Malaysia playing a key role in the 1980s, and Indonesia again at the forefront of the region from the first years of the new century onwards. Thailand and Singapore ...


Beyond The Heroic Stereotype: Sidney Jeffryes And The Mythologising Of Australian Antarctic History, Elizabeth Leane, Ben Maddison, Kimberley Norris Jan 2019

Beyond The Heroic Stereotype: Sidney Jeffryes And The Mythologising Of Australian Antarctic History, Elizabeth Leane, Ben Maddison, Kimberley Norris

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In 2010 the Australian Antarctic Names and Medals Committee announced that it had named a glacier near Commonwealth Bay in East Antarctica in honour of Sidney Jeffryes. Jeffryes was a member of Douglas Mawson's Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE), 1911-14, and the decision to attach his name to an Antarctic feature, coming just before the centenary of the AAE's departure, reflected a gradual historical revisionism around the expedition occurring at this time. Seeking to 'honour … historically significant figures … whose contributions [to the AAE] have not yet been recognised', the Committee also attached the names of two other previously ignored ...


Spiral Jetty, Geoaesthetics, And Art: Writing The Anthropocene, Su Ballard, Elizabeth Linden Jan 2019

Spiral Jetty, Geoaesthetics, And Art: Writing The Anthropocene, Su Ballard, Elizabeth Linden

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Despite the call for artists and writers to respond to the global situation of the Anthropocene, the 'people disciplines' have been little published and heard in the major journals of global environmental change. This essay approaches the Anthropocene from a new perspective: that of art. We take as our case study the work of American land artist Robert Smithson who, as a writer and sculptor, declared himself a 'geological agent' in 1972. We suggest that Smithson's land art sculpture Spiral Jetty could be the first marker of the Anthropocene in art, and that, in addition, his creative writing models ...