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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Travels With My Art: Moya Dyring And Margaret Olley, Melissa J. Boyde Jan 2015

Travels With My Art: Moya Dyring And Margaret Olley, Melissa J. Boyde

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Moya Dyring (1909–1967) was born in Melbourne where she studied at the National Art School. After a successful solo show of her early experimental cubist paintings, she travelled to France where she remained for most of her life. From 1949 Dyring lived in an apartment/studio on the Ile Saint-Louis, a small island on the Seine behind Notre Dame. The apartment became widely known as Chez Moya - an Australian salon in the heart of Paris. Over the next two decades Dyring hosted a transient coterie of Australian artists at Chez Moya. Margaret Olley was one of the young artists ...


Getting My Hands Dirty: Research And Writing, Shady E. Cosgrove Jan 2014

Getting My Hands Dirty: Research And Writing, Shady E. Cosgrove

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Biographical note:

Shady Cosgrove is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Wollongong. Her novel What the Ground Can’t Hold (Picador 2013) tells the story of a group of people stranded in the Andes, all of whom have links to Argentina’s Dirty War. Her memoir She Played Elvis (Allen and Unwin, 2009) was shortlisted for the Australian Vogel Literary Prize, and her short stories and articles have appeared in Best Australian Stories, Antipodes, Southerly, Overland, the Sydney Morning Herald and the Melbourne Age. She has also written about the ethics of representation and teaching of creative writing. For ...


"It Was Filmed In My Home Town": Diasporic Audiences And Foreign Locations In Indian Popular Cinema, Andrew Hassam Jan 2012

"It Was Filmed In My Home Town": Diasporic Audiences And Foreign Locations In Indian Popular Cinema, Andrew Hassam

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The defining feature of Hindi cinema for commentators in the West is the 'interruption' of the narrative, as Gopalan (2002) terms it, by the visualization of songs through dance. Headlines such as 'India's New Cinema has a Global Script' (Pfanner 2006) have, for the past decade, been proclaiming the birth of a globalized Bollywood, but the Bollywood that is 'globalizing' the UK and North America is the Bollywood culture industry of transcultural bhangra, dance fitness classes, and the celebrity world of Aishwarya Rai rather than Hindi cinema, notwithstanding the Oscar nomination of Lagaan (2001) for Best Foreign Language Film ...


My Time; Your Time; The Time Of Living With Myeloma, Moira Stephens, Christopher F. Jordens, Ian Kerridge, Stacy J. Carter, Heather Mckenzie, Tracy King Jan 2012

My Time; Your Time; The Time Of Living With Myeloma, Moira Stephens, Christopher F. Jordens, Ian Kerridge, Stacy J. Carter, Heather Mckenzie, Tracy King

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Abstract of a poster presentation presented at the Joint Meeting of the COSA 39th Annual Scientific Meeting and IPOS 14th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology, 13-15 November 2012, Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre.


My Island Home: Indigenous Festivals And Archipelago Australia, Lisa Slater Jan 2007

My Island Home: Indigenous Festivals And Archipelago Australia, Lisa Slater

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

It’s raining in sunny Queensland. Rain wasn’t on my mind when I left wintry Sydney; then I was wondering: why so many Indigenous festivals now? What are they doing? Where did they come from? To what effect? Having fled a chilly Sydney mid-morning, I arrive Friday afternoon (Day 1 of the Dreaming Festival): after an easy one-hour flight to Brisbane, a clean and surprisingly on-time train to Caboolture, a local school bus toWoodford, I shareWoodford’s only taxi to the festival grounds.My companions are a motley crew; only later do I appreciate that they are somewhat representative ...


Over My Dead Body: Multicultural Social Cohesion In Veronica Mars, Debra Dudek Jan 2007

Over My Dead Body: Multicultural Social Cohesion In Veronica Mars, Debra Dudek

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This paper argues that Veronica Mars foregrounds the notion that multiculturalism is a "field of accumulating whiteness," to borrow Ghassan Hage's phrase, and that multicultural cohesion exists primarily when Brown and Black bodies gain cultural and symbolic capital by accumulating Whiteness.


Review: Jolley, Elizabeth, My Father's Moon, Dorothy L. Jones Jan 1990

Review: Jolley, Elizabeth, My Father's Moon, Dorothy L. Jones

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In My Father's Moon Elizabeth Jolley presents a discontinuous narrative where readers must piece together, through a series of short stories, the life of the narrator, Vera Wright, as schoolgirl, student nurse and young mother. We shift back and forward in time not only between stories but within many of the individual stories as well. Most of the action is set in a period before, quring and just after the Second World War, but the second story, 'My Father's Moon', with its allusions to television, break dance and esoteric religious sects who go in for communal living and ...


Talking About My Childhood: Tacky, Jonathan P. Cockburn Jan 1981

Talking About My Childhood: Tacky, Jonathan P. Cockburn

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The work by Jon Cockburn exhibited in the Wynne Competition at the AGNSW (1981-82) was entitled Talking About my Childhood: Tacky, and this relief sculpture explores the fragmentation of self that accompanies shifting meanings of place. The work takes its title from an instance in 1981 when Joan Brassil, Judith Blackall and Jon Cockburn went to the Australia Hotel, at the Rocks, for a few beers after completing respective projects in their shared studio space (Cumberland Street). Jon Cockburn got talking about his childhood in Papua New Guinea and Joan said: “Jon you have got to be where your soul ...