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Articles 1 - 30 of 6932

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Meeting Students Where They Are: Just In Time Embedded Delivery Of Information And Digital Literacy Skills, Amy Hardy, Clare Mckenzie Jan 2020

Meeting Students Where They Are: Just In Time Embedded Delivery Of Information And Digital Literacy Skills, Amy Hardy, Clare Mckenzie

Senior Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education) - Papers

At the University of Wollongong (UOW) Library we have been exploring ways to deliver information and digital literacy resources at point of need for students. Aligned with the University's strategic direction, the Future Ready Library Strategy points to a digital first mindset and its application to services and resources offered to the UOW community. Combined with the need to embrace the real life challenges faced by higher education students in Australia today, this has led us to develop a suite of digital learning objects in collaboration with teaching academics that can be delivered at scale, enabling a sustainable way ...


Does Social Media Make Us More Or Less Lonely? Depends On How You Use It, Roger Patulny Jan 2020

Does Social Media Make Us More Or Less Lonely? Depends On How You Use It, Roger Patulny

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Humans are more connected to each other than ever, thanks to smartphones, the web and social media. At the same time, loneliness is a huge and growing social problem. Why is this so? Research shows social media use alone can't cure loneliness - but it can be a tool to build and strengthen our genuine connections with others, which are important for a happy life. To understand why this is the case, we need to understand more about loneliness, its harmful impact, and what this has to do with social media.


At A Performance Of The White Album, I Found The Community I Needed In A Time Of Crisis, Karen Cummings Jan 2020

At A Performance Of The White Album, I Found The Community I Needed In A Time Of Crisis, Karen Cummings

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Theatre can be many things. It can provide a catalyst to action, help us make sense of the world, make us feel part of a broader human experience. Sometimes, what happens on stage is the catalyst. Other times it happens because of the gathering theatre creates.


Miss Fisher And Her Fans: How A Heroine On Australia's Small Screen Became A Global Phenomenon, Sue Turnbull Jan 2020

Miss Fisher And Her Fans: How A Heroine On Australia's Small Screen Became A Global Phenomenon, Sue Turnbull

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

A heavily disguised Phryne (Essie Davis) is racing through the streets of Palestine, pursued by armed men. Excitement mounts. Having athletically eluded all attempts to capture her, Phryne sheds her indigo robes to emerge in a sparkling gold dress framed against the skyline like the superhero she has indubitably become.


Capitalized Money, Austerity And The Math Of Capitalism, Timothy Dimuzio, Richard Robbins Jan 2020

Capitalized Money, Austerity And The Math Of Capitalism, Timothy Dimuzio, Richard Robbins

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The Author(s) 2020. This article seeks to contribute to the existing critical debates on money and debt by advancing three main arguments. First, largely due to such debates' tendency for description, the article argues that in in the heterodox literature on money and debt there is no convincing critical theory of money creation. For this reason the authors introduce the theory of capital as power and how it can help us theorize the consequences of present money creation. Second, the authors demonstrate how the capitalization of money creation by a minority of investors not only leads to the political ...


Malnutrition In Rural Solomon Islands: An Analysis Of The Problem And Its Drivers, Joelle Albert, Jessica Bogard, Faye Siota, Joe Mccarter, Salome Diatalau, Josephine Maelaua, Thomas D. Brewer, Neil L. Andrew Jan 2020

Malnutrition In Rural Solomon Islands: An Analysis Of The Problem And Its Drivers, Joelle Albert, Jessica Bogard, Faye Siota, Joe Mccarter, Salome Diatalau, Josephine Maelaua, Thomas D. Brewer, Neil L. Andrew

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

2020 The Authors. Maternal & Child Nutrition published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Solomon Islands, like many Pacific Island nations, suffer from the burden of malnutrition. External drivers including population growth, declining agriculture and fisheries productivity and global food trade have contributed to the transition to greater reliance on imported foods. Globally, diets are recognized as both a cause of and solution to the burden of malnutrition. Using a mixed-method approach this study assessed nutritional status and key determinants of malnutrition among women and young children in rural Solomon Island communities. Quantitative 24-hour recall surveys identified diets of women and young children in these communities to be very limited in diversity. Typical daily diets comprised of fish, sweet potato (and/or rice) and slippery cabbage (a leafy green) usually boiled in coconut milk or baked. Participatory research using problem tree and biocultural approaches identified basic determinants of poor diets and opportunities to address these challenges. We highlight three domains of opportunity to improve diets across multiple scales; 1) improve nutrition-sensitive agriculture and fisheries to produce and distribute diverse, productive and nutrient rich foods; 2) nutrition education and empowerment, focusing on the first 1000 days of life, to influence and inform choices regarding food consumption; and 3) reducing the consumption of imported, energy-rich nutrient poor foods through national and regional policies. These multi-scale domains highlight that food system approaches that strengthen integrated policy and empower people are essential for healthy and sustainable diets in Solomon Islands and more broadly in the Pacific region.


Getting Creative With Less. Recipe Lessons From The Australian Women's Weekly During Wartime, Lauren Samuelsson Jan 2020

Getting Creative With Less. Recipe Lessons From The Australian Women's Weekly During Wartime, Lauren Samuelsson

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Over the past few weeks, Australians have become used to seeing empty shelves in their local supermarkets. Coronavirus-induced panic buying has quickly depleted stocks of products like pasta, rice and flour. Major supermarket chains Coles and Woolworths have introduced restrictions on the purchase of these staple ingredients. Coles has also introduced "rationing" of minced meats. While this is not a genuine food crisis, these limitations will lead Australians to ponder the culinary possibilities of their pantries. Looking at Australia's most widely read women's magazine, the Australian Women's Weekly, shows us how Australians have dealt with food shortages ...


Economic Cognitive Institutions, Enrico Petracca, Shaun Gallagher Jan 2020

Economic Cognitive Institutions, Enrico Petracca, Shaun Gallagher

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Copyright © Millennium Economics Ltd 2020. This paper introduces the notion of 'cognitive' institution and discusses its relevance to institutional economics. Cognitive institutions are conceptually founded on the philosophy of mind notion of extended mind, broadened to also include the distinctly social, institutional, and normative dimensions. Cognitive institutions are defined as institutions that not just allow agents to perform certain cognitive processes in the social domain but, more importantly, without which some of the agents' cognitive processes would not exist or even be possible. The externalist point of view of the extended mind has already had some influence in institutional economics ...


Great Time To Try: 5½ Ways To Make Movie Masterpieces At Home, Aaron L. Burton Jan 2020

Great Time To Try: 5½ Ways To Make Movie Masterpieces At Home, Aaron L. Burton

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Isolation is a common theme in cinema: stranded on an island (Cast Away), in space (Gravity or The Martian), on a boat (Life of Pi), stuck in the desert (127 hours), or simply confined to an apartment (Rear Window). But what about when the filmmakers themselves are stranded?


Really Real And Virtually Real: Celebrating The Works Of Bert Flugelman, Michael K. Organ, Grant C. White, Karen L. Illesca, Nathan L. Riggir, Phillippa J. Webb Jan 2020

Really Real And Virtually Real: Celebrating The Works Of Bert Flugelman, Michael K. Organ, Grant C. White, Karen L. Illesca, Nathan L. Riggir, Phillippa J. Webb

Senior Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education) - Papers

University of Wollongong Library's Wry ARTificer exhibition, featuring the work of Bert Flugelman, blended physical and virtual environments as a practical showcase of the organisation's digital capabilities. A range of technologies were utilised, including the Microsoft Hololens augmented reality platform and 3D digitisation and modelling techniques. The exhibition stimulated collaboration between diverse communities of practice, including curators, archivists, learning technologists, software developers and librarians, to deliver an exciting and innovative interpretation of Flugelman's life and work.


Editorial: Subjectivity And Objectivity In Storytelling Podcasts, Siobhan Mchugh Dec 2019

Editorial: Subjectivity And Objectivity In Storytelling Podcasts, Siobhan Mchugh

RadioDoc Review

In this issue, storytelling podcasts and audio works from the US, UK, Australia and Canada receive in-depth critiques from expert reviewers in Latin America, Australia and the UK. The subjectivity-objectivity spectrum is one focus, along with ethics and aesthetics.


Consent: Objectivity And The Aesthetics Of Re-Enactment In Locative Audio Journalism About A Sexual Assault Trial, Jeanti St Clair Dec 2019

Consent: Objectivity And The Aesthetics Of Re-Enactment In Locative Audio Journalism About A Sexual Assault Trial, Jeanti St Clair

RadioDoc Review

Consent – walk the walk, a geo-locative audio documentary walk in St. John’s, Canada, explores a 2017 sexual assault trial that led to days of protests in the Newfoundland city: an on-duty police officer is charged with sexually assaulting an intoxicated woman he drove home from the town’s nightclub precinct. Producers Chris Brookes and Emily Deming’s work of ‘landscape journalism’ was designed to highlight the tension between popular and legal understandings of the term ‘consent’ in sexual assaults. While the audio walk is a compelling place-based listening experience, Consent raises issues around the impact of dramatised re-enactment in ...


Radio Revolten: 30 Days Of Radio Art - Book Review, Colin Black Dec 2019

Radio Revolten: 30 Days Of Radio Art - Book Review, Colin Black

RadioDoc Review

Radio Revolten: 30 Days of Radio Art documents the Radio Revolten international radio art festival that took place took place during October 2016 in Halle, Germany. It is a densely rich book that explores aspects of radio beyond the format, beyond time schedules and beyond podcast ratings, while still aiming to build a sense of community. It is reviewed by internationally acclaimed Australian sound artist Colin Black.


Skywriting – Making Radio Waves By Robyn Ravlich: Book Review, Mike Ladd Dec 2019

Skywriting – Making Radio Waves By Robyn Ravlich: Book Review, Mike Ladd

RadioDoc Review

Robyn Ravlich’s Skywriting - making radio waves is partly an extended dissertation on feature-making and radio art, and partly an autobiography of this acclaimed Australian audio feature maker from the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). It is reviewed by Mike Ladd, poet, audio producer and an erstwhile ABC colleague.


In The Dark – Pushing The Boundaries Of True Crime, Sharon Davis Nov 2019

In The Dark – Pushing The Boundaries Of True Crime, Sharon Davis

RadioDoc Review

True crime podcasts are a burgeoning genre. As journalists and storytellers, how do we balance the pursuit of justice and our responsibility to the victims with the demand to tell a gripping tale? As listeners, are we using the pain of others for our own entertainment? In the Dark podcast (Seasons 1 and 2) takes us beyond a vicarious fascination with true crime stories into a forensic and essential look at deep-rooted biases, corruption and systemic failures that prevent justice from being served.

The first season (2016) investigates the 1989 kidnapping, sexual assault and murder of 11-year-old Jacob Wetterling In ...


The Feelings Frontier: A Review Of No Feeling Is Final, Britta Jorgensen Nov 2019

The Feelings Frontier: A Review Of No Feeling Is Final, Britta Jorgensen

RadioDoc Review

No Feeling is Final faces a two-fold “feelings frontier” in an age of extreme podcast intimacy and empathy: navigating (1) how to convey the kind of deeply personal “big feelings” that are still often seen as off-limits and (2) how to maintain a hyper-awareness about the listener’s feelings. Taking place almost entirely within her mind, No Feeling is Final is a six-part memoir show about host Honor Eastly’s experiences struggling with mental health and what one mental health professional diagnoses as “too many feelings – about four times as many as the average person”. The ongoing tension between creating ...


Have You Heard George’S Podcast (It's A True Original), Hugh Levinson Oct 2019

Have You Heard George’S Podcast (It's A True Original), Hugh Levinson

RadioDoc Review

The podcast, Have You Heard George’s Podcast, is a true original. Made by George Mpanga, who goes by the stage name of George the Poet, it won five awards at the 2018 British Podcast Awards – in fiction and non-fiction categories. The son of Ugandan immigrants, George went to an elite state school in north London before taking a degree at Cambridge.

The podcast takes on big themes - empowering George’s community, self-belief, crime, drugs, racism, inequality and international politics. Stylistically, the eight-part series is a mash-up: poetry, sketches, interviews, archive, music, performance and sometimes off-mike chat with his producer ...


One Story, Told Week By Week: Episodic Podcast Storytelling And The Habitat, Charlotte De Beauvoir Sep 2019

One Story, Told Week By Week: Episodic Podcast Storytelling And The Habitat, Charlotte De Beauvoir

RadioDoc Review

The rise and success of podcasting introduced episodic storytelling in the world of non-fiction sound narrative. Delivering a story in different entries is very different from producing a one-off piece. What concrete implications does this have for the narrative? And what keeps an audience listening to a podcast, episode through episode? This article offers some answers to these questions via a case study of The Habitat, a 2018 podcast by the American network Gimlet.


Down But Not Out: Tara And George And The Boundaries Of Subjectivity., Hamish Sewell Sep 2019

Down But Not Out: Tara And George And The Boundaries Of Subjectivity., Hamish Sewell

RadioDoc Review

Set on the streets of London, amidst the snarl of traffic and the clip of passers by, this work is a biographical sound portrait of two homeless people, Tara and George. It is a testament to the parlous state of homelessness in the UK today and is masterful in its execution.

To this work, producer and host Audrey Gillan brings a quality of frank disclosure and decency. Relationships between producers and their subjects are contentious, due to an inherent power differential. Gillan neither portrays Tara and George as archetypes nor as helpless and needy. She knows she is the one ...


Notes On Contributors, Index, Anna Rutherford, Anne Collett Aug 2019

Notes On Contributors, Index, Anna Rutherford, Anne Collett

Kunapipi

NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS, Index


Palaver Sauce: A Thematic Selection Of Some West African Proverbs, Martin Bennett Aug 2019

Palaver Sauce: A Thematic Selection Of Some West African Proverbs, Martin Bennett

Kunapipi

If you never offer your uncle palmwine, you'll not learn many proverbs, prompts a Ghanaian saying. The advice seems to have been well-heeded. Whether painted across the fronts of speeding mammy-wagons or issuing from the mouth of a roadside mechanic or a paramount chief, proverbs throughout West Africa are in plentiful supply. Naming ceremonies, marriages, funerals; conversations in urban beer-parlours or by the palm-winetapper's fire; traditional folk-tales, some modem West African novels, highlife lyrics: These are just a few possible sources. Sierra Leoneans say: Proverbs are the daughters of experience. Or to put it another way. When the ...


Mystery Of The Ocean Baths, Zeny Giles Aug 2019

Mystery Of The Ocean Baths, Zeny Giles

Kunapipi

E\ en- time the two of them go for a ride in the car. there is an argument. "I don't want it on. It's too tight.' "It's got to be tight to keep you safe.' She pulls against the strap. "Look I'll hold it.' she says, gripping the silver tab. 'You mustn't hold it. We could have an accident. A policeman might stop us.' 'No-one's going to see me." and she continues to strain against the belt. 'Mum, if you want a ride in this car. you've got to wear a seat belt ...


Conspiracy Of Delight, Zeny Giles Aug 2019

Conspiracy Of Delight, Zeny Giles

Kunapipi

It is something of a miracle to me that at the age of fifty, I should take up all-year- round swimming and grow addicted to the Newcastle Ocean Baths. I've learned to know the Baths through limpid blue and the turbulence of king tides. I've learned to differentiate between 19 degrees and 15 degrees and have, like my fellow regulars, become disdainful of the fickle summer crowds and secretly long for the water temperature to drop so that we, the true believers, can have the Baths back to ourselves.


Binlids At The Boundaries Of Being: A West Belfast Community Stages An Authentic Self, Tom Maguire Aug 2019

Binlids At The Boundaries Of Being: A West Belfast Community Stages An Authentic Self, Tom Maguire

Kunapipi

Much work has been attempted to forge identities beyond the dominant topographies of the political divisions within Northern Ireland; divisions which are expressed most visibly in the so-called 'peace line', a fortified wall that separates communities in West Belfast. The dominant ideologies within the state of Northern Ireland, Britain and internationally, seek to emphasise commonality between communities as a means of diverting attention from the gulfs between them that have been and remain unresolved politically and structurally. In the face of such strategies, the staging of a play in 1997 devised within a Republican community in West Belfast might appear ...


Poems, Jennifer Strauss Aug 2019

Poems, Jennifer Strauss

Kunapipi

STAINS, LIVING IN ENGLISH


Early Days On Point Pearce, Clem O'Loughlin Aug 2019

Early Days On Point Pearce, Clem O'Loughlin

Kunapipi

Anyway, I was born in Wallaroo in 1934. Those years, on Point Pearce, for some reason they didn't take the women into Maitland Hospital to have their baby. They had to go to Wallaroo, being a government hospital, I suppose. I was born there in 1934 and brought up on Point Pearce. I remember going to school at Point Pearce. You had to do lower one, I think that started at age five, and then grade one. I was pretty bright, too. They used to bring the bigger kids into my class and give me sums. I'd add ...


'It's Not A Story. It's History', Sue Hosking Aug 2019

'It's Not A Story. It's History', Sue Hosking

Kunapipi

In 1844 George Fyfe Angas promoted South Australia as a 'model colony', possessing 'a more highly moral, religious and intelligent population with Christian privileges than any other of our colonies' (Pike 138). Our model settlement was supposed to be ardent in its concern for Aborigines. In South Australia, we are now beginning to face up to that promotion as myth.


Poems, Charlene Rajendran Aug 2019

Poems, Charlene Rajendran

Kunapipi

SO MUSH OF ME, SMOKED HAM AND SWEAT WEDDING


St Francis Church, Cochin [1503 Portuguese, 1776 Dutch, 1795 British, 1949 Church Of South India], Paul Sharrad Aug 2019

St Francis Church, Cochin [1503 Portuguese, 1776 Dutch, 1795 British, 1949 Church Of South India], Paul Sharrad

Kunapipi

Dropping free of the blue tinted cool onto hot sand, they trust to collective carapace, elbow through the call, dart, tug of predatory gulls to sanctuary


Making The Sign Of The Cross: Interdisciplinary Intersections In Theology, Australian Studies And Postcolonial Studies, Rebecca Pannell Aug 2019

Making The Sign Of The Cross: Interdisciplinary Intersections In Theology, Australian Studies And Postcolonial Studies, Rebecca Pannell

Kunapipi

This paper posits that there is a meeting place between Theology, Australian Studies and Postcolonial studies and that it lies in the intersections of culture, the crossroads which determine spaces of otherness, identity politics and hybridity. These notions of hybridity and transformation can be found in the symbol of the cross which is constantly being transformed, mutated, corrupted and resurrected in not only visual art, but also in performance texts. These texts reflect diverse responses to organised religion(s) in Australia and its (their) association across a range of interests, from the public arena, such as government policy and social ...