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How To Safely Play Casinos Online, Kimberly Jensen Mar 2090

How To Safely Play Casinos Online, Kimberly Jensen

kimberly jensen

These days there are a number of web sites where members can play casinos Royal1688. These sites make it possible for gambling enthusiasts to indulge in their hobbies from the comfort and privacy of their own homes. Top online casinos offer a gaming atmosphere that is as exciting and realistic as one found in real world gambling hubs.

Why Play Casinos Online

There are a few advantages of playing gambling club on the web. One of the fundamental favorable circumstances is obviously the simple availability. One can get to these sites whenever and from any area. Everything you need is ...


Cv, Oscar E. Macchioni Jan 2017

Cv, Oscar E. Macchioni

Oscar Macchioni

Last update February 2017


Mereological Idealism, Kenneth Pearce Dec 2016

Mereological Idealism, Kenneth Pearce

Kenneth L Pearce

No abstract provided.


From Slave Cabins To The White House: Homemaking Anxiety In African American Culture, Koritha Mitchell Dec 2016

From Slave Cabins To The White House: Homemaking Anxiety In African American Culture, Koritha Mitchell

Koritha Mitchell

A book-length study of what I call "homemaking anxiety," which I first began defining in the article "Mamie Bradley's Unbearable Burden." It is "the palpable tension that emerges when African Americans, especially women, continue to invest in homemaking even while seeing the signs that it won't yield for them the respectability or safety that it should." This project traces the imprint this tension has left on black cultural production, from slavery to the Age of Michelle Obama. Performance theory influences my examination of a wide array of texts—whether novels, plays, or the performance text that is Mrs ...


Mimesis: Foot Washing From Luke To John, Keith L. Yoder Nov 2016

Mimesis: Foot Washing From Luke To John, Keith L. Yoder

Keith L. Yoder

In this paper I argue that the Foot Washing of John 13:1–17, as literary composition, is a creative imitation of the Foot Washing and Anointing of Luke 7:36–50. Comparison of the respective settings, action descriptions, dialogs, and transitions brings to light a large array of mostly unexplored literary connections between these two texts. Analysis of the parallel features reveals a high level of density, order, and distinctiveness that clearly establishes an intertextual relationship of creative imitation, that combination of mimēsis and zēlōsis widely practiced by authors in antiquity. Key markers of directionality arising from the evidence ...


Race And British Colonialism In Southeast Asia, 1770-1870 John Crawfurd And The Politics Of Equality, Gareth Knapman Oct 2016

Race And British Colonialism In Southeast Asia, 1770-1870 John Crawfurd And The Politics Of Equality, Gareth Knapman

Gareth Knapman

The idea of "race" played an increasing role in nineteenth-century British colonial thought. For most of the nineteenth century, John Crawfurd towered over British colonial policy in South-East Asia, being not only a colonial administrator, journalist and professional lobbyist, but also one of the key racial theorists in the British Empire. He approached colonialism as a radical liberal, proposing universal voting for all races in British colonies and believing all races should have equal legal rights. Yet at the same time, he also believed that races represented distinct species of people, who were unrelated. This book charts the development of ...


Reflections On The Case Study: James Tuttle Vs. Lakeland Community College, Harlan Stelmach Jun 2016

Reflections On The Case Study: James Tuttle Vs. Lakeland Community College, Harlan Stelmach

Harlan Stelmach

As a Chair of a large academic department that supervises over thirty adjunct faculty members, I have sympathy with all the parties in this case. I have sympathy for administrators trying to maintain academic oversight of many adjunct faculty members who are often just on campus to teach their courses. I have sympathy for adjunct faculty who are under paid and often do the bulk of teaching at the general education level with very little guidance on the mission and values of an institution. As long as their student evaluations do not cause alarm, benign neglect often defines their relationship ...


Teaching Big History, Richard B. Simon, Mojgan Behmand, Thomas Burke, Esther Quaedackers, Seohyung Kim, Kiowa Bower, Neal Wolfe, James B. Cunningham, Cynthia Taylor, Martin Anderson, J. Daniel May, Philip Novak, Debbie Daunt, Jaime Castner, Ethan Annis, Amy E. Gilbert, Anne Reid, Suzanne Roybal, Alan Schut, Cynthia Brown, Harlan Stelmach Jun 2016

Teaching Big History, Richard B. Simon, Mojgan Behmand, Thomas Burke, Esther Quaedackers, Seohyung Kim, Kiowa Bower, Neal Wolfe, James B. Cunningham, Cynthia Taylor, Martin Anderson, J. Daniel May, Philip Novak, Debbie Daunt, Jaime Castner, Ethan Annis, Amy E. Gilbert, Anne Reid, Suzanne Roybal, Alan Schut, Cynthia Brown, Harlan Stelmach

Harlan Stelmach

Big History is a new field on a grand scale: it tells the story of the universe over time through a diverse range of disciplines that spans cosmology, physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, evolutionary biology, anthropology, and archaeology, thereby reconciling traditional human history with environmental geography and natural history.Weaving the myriad threads of evidence-based human knowledge into a master narrative that stretches from the beginning of the universe to the present, the Big History framework helps students make sense of their studies in all disciplines by illuminating the structures that underlie the universe and the connections among them.Teaching Big ...


The Ilo And The Regulation Of White Lead In Britain During The Interwar Years: An Examination Of International And National Campaigns In Occupational Health, John Alfred Heitmann Jun 2016

The Ilo And The Regulation Of White Lead In Britain During The Interwar Years: An Examination Of International And National Campaigns In Occupational Health, John Alfred Heitmann

John A. Heitmann

Despite the International Labour Organization's (ILO) significance for much of the twentieth century, little has been written on its early history. This case study examines the thin tightrope that the ILO had to walk in balancing the needs and demands of government, employers and labor related to the ILO's Convention No. 13 (1921), "White Lead in Painting.' Great Britain was a leading producer of the pigment white lead prior to the First World War. A government investigation was published in 1915, but measures were shelved during the War. With the peace, the focus of activity shifted to the ...


Review: 'The Science Of Describing: Natural History In Renaissance Europe', John Alfred Heitmann Jun 2016

Review: 'The Science Of Describing: Natural History In Renaissance Europe', John Alfred Heitmann

John A. Heitmann

The author of this book has written a beautifully crafted monograph on Renais- sance natural history. This is a learned, scholarly, and analytical work that goes well beyond surveys in the history of science or Renaissance history, yet at the same time is eminently readable and at times rather entertaining, no mean feat when considering the subject matter. Where else can one learn of the early natural history of the walrus and the bird of paradise? For this reviewer, who gained an extensive background in the history of Renaissance science while in graduate school long ago, but then moved on ...


Doing 'True Science': The Early History Of The 'Institutum Divi Thomae,' 1935-1951, John Alfred Heitmann Jun 2016

Doing 'True Science': The Early History Of The 'Institutum Divi Thomae,' 1935-1951, John Alfred Heitmann

John A. Heitmann

This essay focuses on the origins and early history of the Institutum Divi Thomae (hereafter referred to as the IDT or Institutum), thus describing one particularly rich episode illustrating the relationship between American Catholicism and science during the middle of the twentieth century. The IDT was established by the Archdiocese of Cincinnati in 1935; its faculty and students, while working in the area of cancer research, published hundreds of scientific and technical papers, developed a number of commercial products, and received considerable publicity in both the religious and secular press during the first two decades of its existence. However, with ...


Review: 'Sloss Furnaces And The Rise Of The Birmingham District: An Industrial Epic', John Alfred Heitmann Jun 2016

Review: 'Sloss Furnaces And The Rise Of The Birmingham District: An Industrial Epic', John Alfred Heitmann

John A. Heitmann

Ask a displaced Alabamian (as I did) about their memories of Birmingham, and chances are the first words uttered go something like "dirty, sooty, and poor." During the second half of the twentieth century life rarely got better, as Birmingham was left behind while neighboring Atlanta's reputation, and population, waxed greatly. In short, Birmingham in our time emerged with a rust-belt image, despite its being geographically situated well within the sunbelt, and with its sense of place being negatively attenuated further by the accumulation. of generations of racial injustice. How did Birmingham get that way?


“Oh, God! To Think Man Ever Comes Too Near His Home!”: Thomas Hood’S Poem “The Lee Shore” As A Source For Moby-Dick, Robert J. O’Hara May 2016

“Oh, God! To Think Man Ever Comes Too Near His Home!”: Thomas Hood’S Poem “The Lee Shore” As A Source For Moby-Dick, Robert J. O’Hara

Robert J. O’Hara

Chapter 23 of Moby-Dick, “The Lee Shore,” is constructed around a central simile that likens the enigmatic character Bulkington to a struggling ship that must crowd all sail off shore in order to avoid being wrecked upon the leeward land. Although the comfortable port “would fain give succor,” says the narrator Ishmael, “in that gale, the port, the land, is that ship’s direst jeopardy.” Previous scholars have suggested that Melville’s lee-shore imagery may have been derived from either the whaling narratives of Henry Cheever or the paintings of J.M.W. Turner. I argue that Melville’s source ...


How To Start A Revolution Use Intersectionality As A Framework To Promote Student Success, Donald Mitchell Jr. May 2016

How To Start A Revolution Use Intersectionality As A Framework To Promote Student Success, Donald Mitchell Jr.

Donald Mitchell Jr., Ph.D.

Do you want students to reach their educational goals? My guess is you answered in the affirmative. Nevertheless, we know there are several students who begin their postsecondary educations but do not finish. According to the National Center for Education Statistics (n.d.), the six-year graduation rate for first-time, full-time undergraduate students who began college the fall of 2007 was 59 percent.


Pregnancy Denied, Pregnancy Rejected In Stephanie Daley, Susan Ayres, Prema Manjunath May 2016

Pregnancy Denied, Pregnancy Rejected In Stephanie Daley, Susan Ayres, Prema Manjunath

Susan Ayres

This article offers a reading of Hilary Brougher’s film Stephanie Daley (2006), in which a teen is accused of murdering her newborn (neonaticide). Brougher depicts a “phenomenology of unwanted pregnancy” and an example of therapeutic jurisprudence. Part One examines Brougher’s treatment of the “shadow side of pregnancy,” and highlights barriers to the empathetic treatment of neonaticide. Part Two emphasizes the process of therapeutic jurisprudence as experienced by the two main characters. Brougher’s film provides a social narrative and phenomenology that may influence laws and legal responses and enlarge social understanding of unwanted pregnancy.


Arts And Disability Blogspot, Merry L. Morris May 2016

Arts And Disability Blogspot, Merry L. Morris

Merry Morris

No abstract provided.


In Defense Of The Arts: Creation And Culture In A Time Of War (1939-1945), Andrew Welp, Franny Gaede May 2016

In Defense Of The Arts: Creation And Culture In A Time Of War (1939-1945), Andrew Welp, Franny Gaede

Franny Gaede

Omeka Exhibit featuring Creative works and Journalism from Butler University and Indiana from 1939-1945.


The Social Lab Classroom: Wrestling With—And Learning From—Sustainability Challenges Tle, Danielle L. Lake, Hannah Fernando, Dana Eardley May 2016

The Social Lab Classroom: Wrestling With—And Learning From—Sustainability Challenges Tle, Danielle L. Lake, Hannah Fernando, Dana Eardley

Danielle L Lake

Unlike the traditional disciplinary approach to research and problem-solving still common in higher education, this article explicates and recommends an interdisciplinary, holistic pedagogical approach that takes seriously the interconnectedness of our wicked social sustainability challenges (e.g., poverty, global climate change, food access, among others). We argue that educators can better prepare students to tackle such wicked problems by requiring they engage with locally based problems connected to large-scale systemic challenges. By discussing the design and outcomes of the course “Wicked Problems of Sustainability” from both the students’ and instructor’s perspectives, we seek to extend and enhance effective pedagogical ...


The Dynamics Of Religion At The World Bank, John Rees May 2016

The Dynamics Of Religion At The World Bank, John Rees

John A Rees

This paper analyses the dynamics of religion at the institutional level of international development, and specifically at the World Bank Group (WBG). The phrase ‘dynamics of religion’ describes the interplay of three elements of religion at work in the international development sphere. The secular dynamics of religion are characterized by the subordination of religious actors and interests to other development structures and priorities. The sacral dynamics of religion are characterized by the primacy of religious actors and interests to shape the development agenda and/or contest development priorities. The integrated dynamics of religion are characterized by a balance of secular ...


Plotting The Reading Experience: Theory/Practice/Politics, Paulette Rothbauer (Editor), Kjell-Ivar Skerdingstad (Editor), Lynne Mckechnie (Editor), Knut Oterholm (Editor) Apr 2016

Plotting The Reading Experience: Theory/Practice/Politics, Paulette Rothbauer (Editor), Kjell-Ivar Skerdingstad (Editor), Lynne Mckechnie (Editor), Knut Oterholm (Editor)

Paulette Rothbauer

This book is about the experience of reading—what reading feels like, how it makes people feel, how people read and under what conditions, what drives people to read, and, conversely, what halts the individual in the pursuit of the pleasures of reading. The authors consider reading in all of its richness as they explore readers’ relationships with diverse textual and digital forms. 

This edited volume is divided into three sections: Theory, Practice, and Politics. The first provides insights into ways of seeing, thinking, and conceptualizing the experience of reading. The second features a variety of individual and social practices ...


Memory And Remembering: Sacred History And The York Plays, Clifford Davidson Apr 2016

Memory And Remembering: Sacred History And The York Plays, Clifford Davidson

Clifford Davidson

Against a background which included revolutionary changes in religious belief, extensive enlargement of dramatic styles and the technological innovation of printing, this collection of essays about biblical drama offers innovative approaches to text and performance, while reviewing some well-established critical issues. The Bible in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries appears in a complex of roles in relation to the drama: as an authority and centre of belief, a place of controversy, an emotional experience and, at times, a weapon. This collection brings into focus the new biblical learning, including the re-editing of biblical texts, as well as classical influences, and ...


Kant's Critical Model Of The Experiencing Subject, Kurt Mosser Apr 2016

Kant's Critical Model Of The Experiencing Subject, Kurt Mosser

Kurt Mosser

In an appendix to the Transcendental Analytic of the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant remarks

  • Leibniz intellectualized appearances, just as Locke ... sensualized all concepts or the understanding, i.e. interpreted them as nothing more than empirical or abstracted concepts of reflection. ... each of these great men holds to one only of the two, viewing it as in immediate relation to things in themselves. The other faculty is then regarded as serving only to confuse or to order the representations which this selected faculty yields (A27 1=B327).

Kant, in rejecting the positions of Leibniz and Locke, presents ...


Naturalism And The Surreptitious Embrace Of Necessity, Kurt Mosser Apr 2016

Naturalism And The Surreptitious Embrace Of Necessity, Kurt Mosser

Kurt Mosser

In this article, two philosophical positions that structure distinct approaches in the history of metaphysics and epistemology are briefly characterized and contrasted. While one view, “naturalism,” rejects an a priori commitment to necessity, the other view, “transcendentalism,” insists on that commitment. It is shown that at the level of the fundamentals of thought, judgment, and reason, the dispute dissolves, and the naturalists' employment of “necessity for all practical purposes” is at best only nominally distinct from the transcendentalists' use of the same concept.


Kant’S Logic(S) And The Logic Of Aristotle, Kurt Mosser Apr 2016

Kant’S Logic(S) And The Logic Of Aristotle, Kurt Mosser

Kurt Mosser

In the Preface to the second edition of the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant offers his best·known- indeed, notorious- remark about Aristotle 's logic:

  • Since Aristotle ... logic has not been able to advance a single step, and is thus to all appearance a closed and completed doctrine (Bviii).

I wish to explore here the following question: is Kant in fact saying that since Aristotle. there need be no more concern about logic as a discipline or a field of study, that Aristotle (with some minor embellishments, in terms of presentation) is the last word ...


Comments On Robinson, 'Langton And Traditionalism On Things In Themselves', Kurt Mosser Apr 2016

Comments On Robinson, 'Langton And Traditionalism On Things In Themselves', Kurt Mosser

Kurt Mosser

In her Kantian Humility , Rae Langton has worked very hard to steer us back toward a traditional reading of the Critique of Pure Reason, one that would make it safe to maintain a number of metaphysical commitments in interpreting this text. In his remarks on her work, Professor Robinson points out a number of things that suggest problems with her hermeneutical recommendations, among them the ambiguity of a very crucial word at stake here, “metaphysical.” I have very few disagreements with what Robinson has to say here about Langton but want to utilize ...


The Civilian Left And The Radicalization Of The Dergue, Messay Kebede Apr 2016

The Civilian Left And The Radicalization Of The Dergue, Messay Kebede

Messay Kebede

This article attempts to explain the radicalization of the military committee in Ethiopia known as the Dergue. The committee brought down the monarchy and initiated far-reaching socialist transformations of the country. Yet the Dergue had not initially shown any propensity to radicalism. To explain this conversion to Marxist–Leninist ideology, scholars have thus far provided three prevailing views: (i) the Dergue radicalized to steal the revolution from the civilian left; (ii) objective conditions caused its radicalization; and (iii) radical officers initiated the radicalization. The article critically evaluates these views and shows their serious short-comings. It suggests a new explanation involving ...


Action And Forgetting: Bergson Theory Of Memory, Messay Kebede Apr 2016

Action And Forgetting: Bergson Theory Of Memory, Messay Kebede

Messay Kebede

This paper is about the Bergsonian synchronization of the perpetual present or memory with the passing present or the body. It shows how forgetting narrows and focuses consciousness on the needs of action and how motor memory allows the imagining of the useful side of memory. The paper highlights the strength of Bergson’s analysis by respectively confronting classical theories of memory, the highly regarded perspective of the phenomenological school, Deleuze’s interpretation of Bergsonism, and Sartre’s theory of mental imagery.


Official Sanctity Alla Veneziana: Gerardo, Pietro Orseolo, And Giacomo Salomani, Karen Mccluskey Apr 2016

Official Sanctity Alla Veneziana: Gerardo, Pietro Orseolo, And Giacomo Salomani, Karen Mccluskey

Karen McCluskey

Throughout late medieval and Renaissance Italy, pious men and women were recognized as saints during their own lifetime and accorded at least local veneration at the site of their tomb after death. Despite the absence of formal canonization, such cults were often promoted by local governments keen to enlist the beati as potent new intercessors for their native town. My paper explores the extent to which Venice both conformed to and departed from this pattern. Despite the existence of many local cults, in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries only three local beati were officially recognized: Pietro Orseolo (d. 976), Gerardo ...


Miraculous Visions: Apparitio In The Vitae Of Mediaeval Venetian Saints And Beati, Karen Mccluskey Apr 2016

Miraculous Visions: Apparitio In The Vitae Of Mediaeval Venetian Saints And Beati, Karen Mccluskey

Karen McCluskey

Miraculous visions have played a critical role in reinforcing Venice’s self-perceived identity as God’s favoured locus sanctus from as early as the 10th century. Divine appearances from a cast of hallowed individuals characterises the earliest foundational legends of the city. Indeed, accounts of Mark the Evangelist’s association with Venice are replete with visions from on high, most famously his own apparitio, the miraculous reappearance of his lost relics, dated to June 25, 1094. Thereafter, accounts of apparitio figure prominently in the pictorial narratives of St. Mark’s life in the basilica of San Marco, they pepper ...


“Dead Eyes Open”: The Role Of Experiments In Galvanic Reanimation In Nineteenth-Century Popular Culture, Elizabeth Stephens Apr 2016

“Dead Eyes Open”: The Role Of Experiments In Galvanic Reanimation In Nineteenth-Century Popular Culture, Elizabeth Stephens

Associate Professor Elizabeth Stephens

During the first decades of the 19th century, a number of prominent scientists conducted experiments in the revival of dead organisms using new galvanic technologies. In several cases, these experiments were conducted on human bodies, using the corpses of executed criminals. Such experiments captured the cultural imaginary of the day, posing new questions about the relationship between emergent technologies, automated movement, and human agency. This article examines the role played by spectacle, aesthetics, and new practices and technologies of visualization in these scientific experiments.