Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Arts and Humanities Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Uniqueness And The Image Of God: A Theological And Philosophical Justification Of The Value Of Diversity, Mark S. Mcleod-Harrison Dec 2014

Uniqueness And The Image Of God: A Theological And Philosophical Justification Of The Value Of Diversity, Mark S. Mcleod-Harrison

Christian Perspectives in Education

In Christian education, cultural diversity is valued. But what is the theological basis for that value? While our commonality as human persons is rooted in the image of God, what about the diversity of human beings and the cultural diversity flowing from it? This essays argues that although the image of God is common to us all, there is an account of the image of God that provides for uniqueness as well and that individual uniqueness is at the core of human being as we participate in our cultural forms of life.


God And Gratuitous Evil, Michael Schrynemakers Oct 2014

God And Gratuitous Evil, Michael Schrynemakers

All Graduate Works by Year: Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

William Rowe has argued for atheism as follows: (1) There seem to be evils God could have prevented without losing a greater good or permitting some evil equally bad or worse, and (2) God would not allow such evils. This dissertation examines (2), the "No Gratuitous Evil Thesis," and its role in Rowe's argument. In Part One I argue that there are crucial ambiguities in the notion of a greater good this thesis appeals to and that these present dilemmas for Rowe's argument, as well as for defining gratuitous evil. This leads to my approximation of the notion ...


Seeing Christ In Philosophy, Neal Deroo Jul 2014

Seeing Christ In Philosophy, Neal Deroo

Faculty Work: Comprehensive List

"With philosophy, we can start to articulate those assumptions and cultural moods to better understand what we're doing, and then evaluate them to see why we do them and whether they are in keeping with God's loving design for his creation."

Posting about a Christian perspective on philosophy from In All Things - an online hub committed to the claim that the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ has implications for the entire world.

http://inallthings.org/philosophy-as-a-way-of-life/


Cartesian Modality: God's Nature And The Creation Of Eternal And Contingent Truth, Kristopher Gordon Phillips Jul 2014

Cartesian Modality: God's Nature And The Creation Of Eternal And Contingent Truth, Kristopher Gordon Phillips

Theses and Dissertations

Much ado has been made regarding Descartes's understanding of the creation of what he called the "eternal truths" because he described them, paradoxically, as both the free creations of God, and necessary. While there are many varying interpretations of Cartesian modality, the issue has heretofore been treated in a vacuum, as a niche issue having little import beyond being an interesting puzzle for Descartes Scholars. I argue that this treatment is misguided, and that in order to properly understand Cartesian philosophy at all, one must properly understand Descartes's theory of modality. This, however, is no small feat; in ...


Hypothetical Necessity And The Laws Of Nature: John Locke On God's Legislative Power, Elliot Rossiter Jun 2014

Hypothetical Necessity And The Laws Of Nature: John Locke On God's Legislative Power, Elliot Rossiter

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

The focus of my dissertation is a general and comprehensive examination of Locke’s view of divine power. My basic argument is that John Locke is a theological voluntarist in his understanding of God’s creative and providential relationship with the world, including both the natural and moral order. As a voluntarist, Locke holds that God freely imposes both the physical and moral laws of nature onto creation by means of his will: this contrasts with the intellectualist perspective in which the laws of nature emerge from the essences of things. For Locke, there are no intrinsically necessary laws in ...


Leibniz's Theodicies, Joseph Michael Anderson May 2014

Leibniz's Theodicies, Joseph Michael Anderson

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Evil poses a particular problem to early modern thinkers. Late scholasticism, while itself variegated, provided a number of resources for dispelling concerns about the justice of God raised by the existence of evil. With much of the metaphysics of the scholastics rejected, the new philosophers needed either to find inventive ways to make the old solutions fit into their new systems, to come up with new resources for dispelling the difficulties, or to accept the difficulties as insurmountable, likely via fideism or atheism. Leibniz, I claim, provides a provocative mixture of the first two approaches.

Many readers think Leibniz's ...


Az Út Az Értelem Felé (On The Road To Meaning’), Attila Tanyi Dec 2013

Az Út Az Értelem Felé (On The Road To Meaning’), Attila Tanyi

Attila Tanyi

The paper offers a philosophically infused analysis of Cormac McCarthy’s The Road. The main idea is that McCarthy’s novel is primarily a statement on the meaning of life. Once this idea is argued for and endorsed, by using a parallel between The Road and a 19th century Hungarian dramatic poem, The Tragedy of Man, the paper goes on to argue that the most plausible – although admittedly not the only possible – interpretation of The Road is that it advocates a religious account of the meaning of life that uses what I call a practical conception of God (that borrows ...


Arguing With God: An Honest Conversation, Barry Fike Dec 2013

Arguing With God: An Honest Conversation, Barry Fike

Barry D. Fike

For the Jew, “I beg to differ” has been an enduring tactic of achieving and affirming identity. The Jew had addressed the same caveat to God—not in self-contradiction, but in dialectic aiming at attainment of fuller realization of who he is, as Jew and as human being. In asking about God, we examine our own selves: whether we are sensitive to the grandeur and supremacy of what we ask about, whether we are wholeheartedly concerned with what we ask about. Unless we are involved, we fail to sense the issue.


Review Of The Puzzle Of Existence: Why Is There Something Rather Than Nothing?, Kenneth L. Pearce Dec 2013

Review Of The Puzzle Of Existence: Why Is There Something Rather Than Nothing?, Kenneth L. Pearce

Kenneth L Pearce

No abstract provided.