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2014

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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

The Hidden Point Of Intersection: Bio-Politics In Foucault And Agamben, Jason Walsh Sep 2014

The Hidden Point Of Intersection: Bio-Politics In Foucault And Agamben, Jason Walsh

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

The relationship between sovereignty and bio-politics has been frequently discussed and debated in the literature sounding the work of Michel Foucault and Giorgio Agamben. A number of commentators firmly align themselves with Foucault, charging Agamben with some combination of ahistoricism and reductionism in his account of sovereignty. They see Foucault as not guilty of these sins, and therefore preferable. Many of these critiques, however, arise from conflating two separate levels of analysis: history and power. By holding apart these two domains, I will attempt to offer a qualified defense of Agamben and subsequently show that he and Foucault are not ...


Commentary On "Contrasting Models Of The God-World Relation: Avicenna, Maimonides And Al-Shahrastani", Matthew Williams Sep 2014

Commentary On "Contrasting Models Of The God-World Relation: Avicenna, Maimonides And Al-Shahrastani", Matthew Williams

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

In his paper “Contrasting Models of the God-World Relationship: Avicenna, Maimonides and Al-Shahrasānī,” Harrington Critchley makes a very cogent argument for the superior adaptability of Avicenna’s model for the necessary existence of God, as compared to Maimonides’ and Al-Shahrasānī’s own. Though there are certainly problems to be found in Avicenna’s model, I would prefer to take this opportunity to admire rather than critique it.


Contrasting Models Of The God-World Relation: Avicenna, Maimonides And Al-Shahrastani", Harrington Critchley Sep 2014

Contrasting Models Of The God-World Relation: Avicenna, Maimonides And Al-Shahrastani", Harrington Critchley

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

This essay considers Avicenna’s conception of God as the ‘Necessary Existent’ and the subsequent uses of this designation in the thinking of Moses Maimonides and Muhammad Al-Shahrastānī. Specifically, it considers how this term affects each thinker’s understanding of God’s being ‘above perfection,’ as suggested by their respective intimations regarding what they take to be His most prominent attribute. In turn, these distinct understandings influence their contrasting models of the relationship between God and the created order. I demonstrate how Avicenna employs his modal categories in order to determine God’s attributes, pinpointing ‘necessity’ as the attribute that ...


Pragmatic-Expressivist Semantics In Ovid's Poetics, Jaryth Webber Sep 2014

Pragmatic-Expressivist Semantics In Ovid's Poetics, Jaryth Webber

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

The Augustan poets had at their disposal a vast storehouse of philosophical vocabulary, consimilar to their cache of both mythological and historical vocabularies. Vergil, for instance, had incorporated much of both the prevailing Epicureanism and the impending Stoicism of his age; the notion of philosophical appropriation in poetry as a defense against amphigory is superabundant in the aesthetics of Horace’s Ars Poetica:

Humano capiti ceruicem pictor equinam

iungere si uelit et uarias inducere plumas

undique collatis membris, ut turpiter atrum

desinat in piscem mulier formosa superne,

spectatum admissi, risum teneatis, amici? [i]

It would not be a maggoty, vagarious ...


Philosophical Consolation, Sam Taylor Sep 2014

Philosophical Consolation, Sam Taylor

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

In November of 2012 my father was diagnosed with a severe form of brain cancer. In this paper, I outline how I try to use the teachings of two philosophers, Epictetus and Albert Camus, to try and find solace and consolation my father’s diagnosis and fate.


By No Mere Means, Lu-Vada Dunford Sep 2014

By No Mere Means, Lu-Vada Dunford

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

Photographs are many things. The mechanical process by which photographs are generated ensures their factivity. The information they carry is independent of whatever a photographer might believe. We have faith in the veracity of photographs. And they are democratic. Anyone who has access to a camera has the means to image reality. But photographs are not just exemplar recordings. They can be so much more. Photographic art speaks to us and continuously inspires new personal realizations. But Scruton claims that to defend photography as art is to place in the hands of everyone the means to be an artist. I ...


Comments On ‘A Marxist Critique Of The Individual, Rational, Self-Interested, Wealth Maximizer”, Lee Pennebaker Sep 2014

Comments On ‘A Marxist Critique Of The Individual, Rational, Self-Interested, Wealth Maximizer”, Lee Pennebaker

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

This paper brings to light many pertinent observations and claims about the nature of individuals, our relationships to one another, and society as a whole. This paper appears to be deeply concerned with human psychology and the philosophical conditions that characterize it. I plan to focus my comments on both the psychological and normative aspects of the paper: specifically, concerns about the author’s[1] examination of the processes that shape our minds and the prevailing questions that almost certainly follow if these claims are true. In short, I would like to explore further the author’s examination of the ...


Unified Teleology: Paul Taylor's Biocentric Egalitarianism Through Aristotle, Zoe Grabow Sep 2014

Unified Teleology: Paul Taylor's Biocentric Egalitarianism Through Aristotle, Zoe Grabow

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

In this paper I examine the similarities between Paul Taylor’s and Aristotle’s teleological accounts as outlined in Taylor’s concept of biocentric egalitarianism from Respect for Nature and Aristotle’s concept of “for the sake of” from Politics I.8, and I show how Aristotle’s account can partially support Taylor’s. I discuss Aristotle’s virtue ethics and what they offer in terms of piecing together an environmental ethic, and I draw attention to an implied value—recipient value—that assigns significant worth to all living things “for the sake of” that is similar to Taylor’s ...


Divergent Teleology: A Response To Zoe Grabow’S Reconciliation Of Taylor And Aristotle, Austen Harrison Sep 2014

Divergent Teleology: A Response To Zoe Grabow’S Reconciliation Of Taylor And Aristotle, Austen Harrison

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

In this paper, I will provide a commentary of “Unified Teleology: Paul Taylor’s Biocentric Egalitarianism through Aristotle.” In addition to providing an account of Zoe Grabow’s reconciliation of Aristotle’s value ethics with Paul Taylor’s “respect for nature,” I will also attempt to offer a few thoughts on some of the primary philosophical tensions mentioned by Grabow. The most notable of these issues include the adoption of Aristotle’s ancient philosophy to a modern conception of environmental ethics, the limitations of Taylor’s “biocentric egalitarianism”, and the nature of the relationship between humans and the environment.


Commentary On "Narrow Bridge Games And Their Rescue Of Rational Constraints In Moral Contractualism", Maia Bernick Sep 2014

Commentary On "Narrow Bridge Games And Their Rescue Of Rational Constraints In Moral Contractualism", Maia Bernick

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

Commentary on "Narrow Bridge Games and Their Rescue of Rational Constraints in Moral Contractualism"


Narrow Bridge Games And Their Rescue Of Rational Constraints In Moral Contractualism, Gabriel Rusk Sep 2014

Narrow Bridge Games And Their Rescue Of Rational Constraints In Moral Contractualism, Gabriel Rusk

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

Contractualism is a normative theory of ethics that posits that what an individual ought or ought not do arises from an antecedent (or prior) moral agreement, deliberation, or acknowledgement. The nature of this agreement, as in its conditions, such as the nature of the persons involved, the circumstances of the agreeing process, and the constraints on the process should produce the resulting deliberative and normative morality. In this paper I will explore the “constraint critique” of contractualism. First I will explore the necessary tenets of contractualism and why any constraints are necessary. Second, I will explain why contractualist agreements cannot ...


Lewis In The Dock (Part 2): A Brief Review Of The Secular Media's Coverage Of The 50th Anniversary Of C.S. Lewis's Death, Richard James May 2014

Lewis In The Dock (Part 2): A Brief Review Of The Secular Media's Coverage Of The 50th Anniversary Of C.S. Lewis's Death, Richard James

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

In 1999, I presented a paper here at this colloquium on the secular print media's response to the 1998 C.S. Lewis Centenary Celebration. In 2014, it seems only natural to do a similar paper on the secular media's coverage of the 50th anniversary of Lewis's death which also included the dedication in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey of a memorial stone in his honor. The number of articles again abound, even more than in 1998. This second paper will consider articles by syndicated literary, news and religious columnists from secular newspapers and periodicals; internet postings by ...


Maleeldil And Mutual Society: A Modern Woman's Defense Of Jane Studdock, Crystal Hurd May 2014

Maleeldil And Mutual Society: A Modern Woman's Defense Of Jane Studdock, Crystal Hurd

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

Over the past few decades, many scholars and casual readers have derided C.S. Lewis as a misogynist for the "expulsion" of Susan from Aslan's Country. However, closer examinations of Lewis's underlying philosophy and previous experiences with women lend us exceptional insight into his changing perspective as well as his portrayal of feminine characters. Written before his wildly popular The Chronicles of Narnia, Lewis's science fiction or Ransom trilogy provides a glimpse into his developing talents as a fiction writer but also provides crucial commentary on the gender issues plaguing the twentieth century. This paper will investigate ...


The Wizard In The Well: The Transmogrification Of The Mythical Merlin In C.S. Lewis's That Hideous Strength, Mark R. Hall May 2014

The Wizard In The Well: The Transmogrification Of The Mythical Merlin In C.S. Lewis's That Hideous Strength, Mark R. Hall

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

No abstract provided.


The Artistry Of C.S. Lewis: An Examination Of The Illustrations For Boxen And The Chronicles Of Narnia, Kathryne Hall May 2014

The Artistry Of C.S. Lewis: An Examination Of The Illustrations For Boxen And The Chronicles Of Narnia, Kathryne Hall

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

No abstract provided.


The Wars We Sing Of: Modern And Medieval Warfare In Tolkien's Middle-Earth, Alethea Gaarden May 2014

The Wars We Sing Of: Modern And Medieval Warfare In Tolkien's Middle-Earth, Alethea Gaarden

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

No abstract provided.


The Good Catastrophe: Tolkien On The Consolation Of The Happy Ending, John Stanifer May 2014

The Good Catastrophe: Tolkien On The Consolation Of The Happy Ending, John Stanifer

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

When describing the nature of fairy-stories, Tolkien famously coined the term "eucatastrophe" ("eu meaning "good") to express the effect of the "sudden joyous turn" that leads to the story's happy ending regardless of the dark events preceding it. Tolkien applies that word specifically to fairy-stories, but I would like to explore its meaning in relation to other genres and mediums that Tolkien was either unable or unwilling to consider. Classic literature and modern popular culture alike are ripe with the use o the "good" catastrophe, and this device is well-known by cultures from all parts of the globe. If ...


Through The Lens Of The Four Loves: The Idea Of Love In The Screwtape Letters, Paulette Sauders May 2014

Through The Lens Of The Four Loves: The Idea Of Love In The Screwtape Letters, Paulette Sauders

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

It is my contention that when C.S. Lewis wrote his non-fiction book The Four Loves and published it in 1960, he had not been thinking about love in all of its manifestations for just a short time before it was written. All of the fictional works he worte over the years, beginning in at least 1938, reflect his definitions and descriptions of the various kinds of love and their perversions that he systematically desctibes so well in The Four Loves. He does this in his fiction through his various characters and their actions.

In Out of the Silent Planet ...


Lisa Tetzner's Translation Of C.S. Lewis's The Lion, The Witch And The Wardrobe, Betsy Susan Morgan May 2014

Lisa Tetzner's Translation Of C.S. Lewis's The Lion, The Witch And The Wardrobe, Betsy Susan Morgan

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

According to UNESCO's website, Index Translationum, C.S. Lewis's The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe has been translated 127 times. The first person to translate the novel was Lisa Tetzner and it is this translation, which has run through the most editions. This paper proposes to look at that translation in terms of accuracy and to examine the changes that were made in terms of purpose. Were they caused by differences between the languages or were they motivated by other concerns? This paper will be an abridgment of a master's thesis written for the Children's ...


George Macdonald And J.R.R. Tolkien On Faerie And Fairy Stories, Paul E. Michelson May 2014

George Macdonald And J.R.R. Tolkien On Faerie And Fairy Stories, Paul E. Michelson

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

The paper discusses the ideas of George MacDonald and J.R.R. Tolkien on Faërie and Fairy Stories, based on an analysis of MacDonald's essay "The Fantastic Imagination," Tolkien's "On Fairy-Stories," Tolkien's correspondence, and Tolkien's unpublished introduction to MacDonald's The Golden Key.


Once A Queen Of Glome, Always A Queen Of Narnia: Orual And Susan's Denial Of The Divine And Redemption Through Grace, Kat D. Coffin May 2014

Once A Queen Of Glome, Always A Queen Of Narnia: Orual And Susan's Denial Of The Divine And Redemption Through Grace, Kat D. Coffin

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

Susan Pevensie is one of the most misunderstood characters in C.S. Lewis' classic series, The Chronicles of Narnia. Writers such as Neil Gaiman, J.K. Rowling, and Philip Pullman have declared the character's face as a reflection of Lewis' sexism and misogyny, further claiming that Susan's exclusion from the final book of the series was due to her penchant for lipstick and nylons. Feminist criticism has found Susan's treatment pointedly gendered, displaying Lewis' supposedly negative attitude towards traditional forms of femininity.

While "the problem of Susan" has garnered critical response, little thought has been given to ...


"The Fairy Way Of Writing": Spenser's The Faerie Queene And C.S. Lewis's "Habit Of Mind", Susan Wendling May 2014

"The Fairy Way Of Writing": Spenser's The Faerie Queene And C.S. Lewis's "Habit Of Mind", Susan Wendling

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

While readers of C.S. Lewis have commonly noted his early love for myths, fairy tales and epic poetry, the fullest impact of Edmund Spenser's 1590 classic The Faerie Queene on Lewis's "habit of mind," and his own writing has yet to be explored. Following the lead of Doris Myers, that "learning about Spenser leads us into Lewis's inner life," the essay first briefly reviews some of Lewis's responses. With his lifelong of Spenser established, the essay then discusses two aspects of embodied in The Faerie Queene itself: 1) it's ancient neoplatonic worldview with its ...


A Brief History Of The New York C.S. Lewis Society, Robert Trexler May 2014

A Brief History Of The New York C.S. Lewis Society, Robert Trexler

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

The proposed presentation would describe the origins and development of the first C.S. Lewis Society, formed in New York City in 1969. Along with detailing the society's growth over a period of 45 years, the talk will recount highlights from many "Lewis Weekends" held beginning in 1977, and the prominent speakers we have been honored to invite, including Own Barfield, Walter Hooper, Christopher Derrick, Cardinal Avery Dulles, Paul Holmer, Peter Kreeft, William Griffin, Christopher Mitchell, Louis Markos, Michael Ward, Charlie Star, and Will Vaus (among others!). The talk will also mention changes in the Society's publication, The ...


What Lewis Never Wrote: Quotes Misattributed To The Oxford Professor Don, William O'Flaherty May 2014

What Lewis Never Wrote: Quotes Misattributed To The Oxford Professor Don, William O'Flaherty

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

Most people today rely on the Internet for quotations and their sources. While C.S. Lewis is frequently very quotable, there are many quotes attributed to him that he never wrote. This talk will present those quotes frequently falsely attributed to Lewis, provide proof that he never said them, and (where possible) show who wrote them. Examples are: "You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body," and "You are never too old to set another goal or dream a new dream." Additionally the talk will explore what these non-Lewis quotes say about a culture ...


King Maker In The Mind Of The Maker, Mark Eckel May 2014

King Maker In The Mind Of The Maker, Mark Eckel

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

"The mind of the maker and the Mind of the Maker are formed on the same pattern, and all their works are made in their own image." Dorothy Sayers goes to great lengths to expose a Christian view of creativity. Seen from a First Testament perspective, Sayer's ideas conform closely to human kingship originally intended by God; the vestigates of the robes remain.

In this paper I will seek to intersect Sayer's views of The Creator, the creature, creation, and creativity with the biblical-cultural connections in Genesis 1. What does it mean to be made in God's ...


Cartographer Of The Divine: C.S. Lewis As Doctor Ecclesiae, Donald T. Williams May 2014

Cartographer Of The Divine: C.S. Lewis As Doctor Ecclesiae, Donald T. Williams

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

No abstract provided.


C.S. Lewis' Warnings On Education, Zachary A. Rhone May 2014

C.S. Lewis' Warnings On Education, Zachary A. Rhone

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

The Lewis connoisseur is likely to recall his opinions on education, expressed in Surprised by Joy, "My First School," "Democratic Education," and, especially, "Screwtape Proposes a Toast." The surprise, however, is exactly how prophetic Jack was in his examination of education, its direction, and the reasons for its direction. My presentation will examine Lewis' view of education in lieu of the cultural shifts of the mid-to-late-twentieth century. Proposals to revise the British and American educational systems such as the Norwood Report of 19434, the Newsom Report in 1963, the Robbins Report of 1963, and even the No Child Left Behind ...


C.S. Lewis, Thomas Wolfe, And The Transatlantic Expression Of Sehnsucht, Jedidiah Evans May 2014

C.S. Lewis, Thomas Wolfe, And The Transatlantic Expression Of Sehnsucht, Jedidiah Evans

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

No abstract provided.


A Day In The Life Of A Hero: The Three Unities In C.S. Lewis's Neo-Classical Romance, Joe R. Christopher May 2014

A Day In The Life Of A Hero: The Three Unities In C.S. Lewis's Neo-Classical Romance, Joe R. Christopher

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

C.S. Lewis's "The Nameless Isle" is, if one ignores the first fifty-seven lines as an introduction, curiously shaped to meet the requirements of the Three Unities as the Renaissance and as Neo-classicism understood Aristotle's Poetics. Or at least two of them. The Unity of Place is obvious: all the action is set on the same isle. The Unity of Plot may be debatable since the dwarf has more to do with the resolution of the conflict than the hero does, but at least there is only one basic conflict. And, most impressive of the Three, all the ...


A Look At The Lewis Trilemma, Mark Taylor May 2014

A Look At The Lewis Trilemma, Mark Taylor

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

No abstract provided.