Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Arts and Humanities Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

On Good People: A New Defense Of Rule-Consequentialism, Ryan Jenkins Aug 2014

On Good People: A New Defense Of Rule-Consequentialism, Ryan Jenkins

Philosophy Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Rule-consequentialism is an ethical theory that does a better job than any other of justifying our moral intuitions from a single overarching principle. My dissertation defends a novel formulation of this view as an account of a good person.

First, I argue that a rule-consequentialist does “what a good person would do,” and that if everyone were like her, the world would be as good as possible.

Second, good people sometimes do more than is required of them, and so a theory of the good person must explain supererogation, i.e. “going above and beyond the call of duty.”

Third ...


Postwar Moral Obligation: The Duties Of Victory, Michael Alan Growden Jul 2014

Postwar Moral Obligation: The Duties Of Victory, Michael Alan Growden

Philosophy Graduate Theses & Dissertations

In this dissertation, I aim to answer the following question: what postwar moral obligations do just war victors incur at war's end? To answer this question, I begin the project by sketching the just war framework from within which my analysis proceeds. Specifically, I present a justice-based theory of defensive wartime harming that draws heavily from Jeff McMahan's recent work on the topic. One of the key ideas underlying this justice-based approach is the claim that the moral principles governing harming in war reduce to the same moral principles governing defensive harming in domestic defense cases.

Working from ...


Roles And Responsibilities: Creating Moral Subjects, Chelsea Mae Haramia Jul 2014

Roles And Responsibilities: Creating Moral Subjects, Chelsea Mae Haramia

Philosophy Graduate Theses & Dissertations

This work centers on the non-identity problem, but the implications of my view extend well beyond standard non-identity cases. The non-identity problem arises when moral agents are in a position to determine both the welfare and existence of the moral subject(s) in question. If we assume a very commonsense account of harm--the comparative account--then causing a subject to exist entails, under some circumstances, that low welfare is not actually a matter of moral concern. This seems intuitively incorrect. The non-identity problem challenges what seem to be very clear intuitions about wrongness and harm, and it uncovers distinct moral considerations ...


On Good People: A New Defense Of Rule-Consequentialism, Ryan Jenkins Jun 2014

On Good People: A New Defense Of Rule-Consequentialism, Ryan Jenkins

Philosophy Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Rule-consequentialism is an ethical theory that does a better job than any other of justifying our moral intuitions from a single overarching principle. My dissertation defends a novel formulation of this view as an account of a good person.

First, I argue that a rule-consequentialist does "what a good person would do," and that if everyone were like her, the world would be as good as possible.

Second, good people sometimes do more than is required of them, and so a theory of the good person must explain supererogation, i.e. "going above and beyond the call of duty."

Third ...


Intuitive And Reflective Responses In Philosophy, Nick Byrd May 2014

Intuitive And Reflective Responses In Philosophy, Nick Byrd

Philosophy Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Cognitive scientists have revealed systematic errors in human reasoning. There is disagreement about what these errors indicate about human rationality, but one upshot seems clear: human reasoning does not seem to fit traditional views of human rationality. This concern about rationality has made its way through various fields and has recently caught the attention of philosophers. The concern is that if philosophers are prone to systematic errors in reasoning, then the integrity of philosophy would be threatened. In this paper, I present some of the more famous work in cognitive science that has marshaled this concern. Then I present reasons ...


An Argument Against The Person-Affecting View Of Wrongness, Jeannine Marie Bailey Apr 2014

An Argument Against The Person-Affecting View Of Wrongness, Jeannine Marie Bailey

Philosophy Graduate Theses & Dissertations

An act is usually thought of as wrong only if it harms someone and to harm someone is, roughly speaking, to make her worse off. However, the view that an act is wrong only if it harms some particular individual restricts us to a person-affecting view about wrongness. If an act is wrong that does not make any individual worse off, this wrongness cannot be explained in terms of person-affecting consequences. I want to propose that an action can be wrong even if no particular individual is harmed by that act. This argument relies on the idea that an action ...


Vagueness And Fundamentality, Joseph Michael Fraley Jan 2014

Vagueness And Fundamentality, Joseph Michael Fraley

Philosophy Graduate Theses & Dissertations

How can we tell whether a concept is vague? Is it possible to generate reliable methods for demonstrating vagueness and clearness without having an analysis of the nature of vagueness? Are there good methods that are neutral with respect to standard metaphysics of vagueness? I argue for two methods. First, I argue that the way sorites series work entails that no concepts that pick out fundamental features are vague. If a concept is vague, then what it picks out is not fundamental. Second, I argue that if a concept is not vague, then what it picks out is fundamental. There ...


Wholly, Grounding, Truth, Noel B. Saenz Jan 2014

Wholly, Grounding, Truth, Noel B. Saenz

Philosophy Graduate Theses & Dissertations

This thesis is about how grounding, in some sense or other, and whether explicitly or implicitly, bears on truthmaking, groundmaking, and wholemaking.

Part I deals with truthmaking and argues that one can be a truthmaker theorist and yet reasonably reject truthmaker maximalism — the claim that all truths have truthmakers. It does this by arguing that there are worlds where it is reasonable to think that negative existentials lack truthmakers but where such worlds do not jeopardize truthmaker theory. It also argues in favor of two claims: It argues in favor of thinking that truthmaking should not be analyzed solely in ...


The Non-Solicitation Principle Of Democratic Legitimacy, James Michael Hall Jan 2014

The Non-Solicitation Principle Of Democratic Legitimacy, James Michael Hall

Philosophy Graduate Theses & Dissertations

There are many problems with contemporary forms of democratic government. Apathy, factions, and the problem of legitimizing authority in a democracy plagued by both are among the most important of the problems democracies face today, especially in the United States. I propose a principle of non-solicitation for government positions. This principle solves the aforementioned problems by (i) widening the sphere of possible political participation, (ii) abating the problem of factions, and (iii) legitimizing authority as the right to rule under deliberative democracy, consent, reasonable consensus, and equality theories of legitimization.