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Philosophy

1999

儒家

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由死而觀生的中醫學, Hongzhong Qiu Jan 1999

由死而觀生的中醫學, Hongzhong Qiu

International Journal of Chinese & Comparative Philosophy of Medicine

The theoretical basis of traditional Chinese medicine lies in Confucianism and Daoism. Hence traditional Chinese medicine's perspectives on death have continuity with both the Confucian and the Daoist views on death. This essay analyzes many ancient Chinese medical texts and tries to articulate their views on death and dying.

Concerning the definition of death, traditional Chinese medicine offers two theories. One theory sees death as the loss of shen (spirit) or the separation of shen (spirit) from the body. Shen is located in our vital organs, not just in the brain. Another theory sees death as the dispersion of ...


儒道死亡思想之比較, Fenglin Jin Jan 1999

儒道死亡思想之比較, Fenglin Jin

International Journal of Chinese & Comparative Philosophy of Medicine

This essay is a comparative and in-depth analysis of the Classical Confucian (Confucius, Mencius) and Classical Daoist (Lao Zi, Zhuang Zi) views on death. Four aspects of these two philosophies of death (attitude toward death, philosophical articulation of the essence of death, valuation of death, and transcending death) are analyzed and critically contrasted.

First, regarding the general attitude toward death, Confucianism is more rational whereas Daoism is more mystical. Confucianism deems that the problem of human life is more important than the problem of human death, and hence speaks little of death. Daoism, however, is strongly against the human tendency ...


醫療行善:中國醫學道德傳統的詮釋, Daqing Zhang Jan 1999

醫療行善:中國醫學道德傳統的詮釋, Daqing Zhang

International Journal of Chinese & Comparative Philosophy of Medicine

China has a long standing of a dominant medical ethical tradition. This tradition can be characterized a medial beneficence. The physician, within this tradition, is morally required to pursue the best interest of the patient rather than the best interest of himself. The practice of this tradition is characteristic of the Chinese culture of family determination on medical issues and is also closely related to the basic virtues approved in the Chinese community.

This tradition is rooted in three primary Chinese religions. First, Confucianism sets the basis of Chinese medical beneficence. Confucianism emphasizes humanity (ren) as the fundamental principle of ...