Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Arts and Humanities Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Philosophy

Selected Works

Institution
Keyword
Publication Year
Publication
File Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 4484

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

The Cosmological Significance Of Animal Generation, Devin Henry Dec 2104

The Cosmological Significance Of Animal Generation, Devin Henry

Devin Henry

This paper explores the relation between Aristotle’s mature theory of animal generation and his broader cosmology.


How To Solve Hume’S Problem Of Induction, Alexander Jackson Jan 2018

How To Solve Hume’S Problem Of Induction, Alexander Jackson

Alexander Jackson

This paper explains what’s wrong with a Hume-inspired argument for skepticism about induction. Hume’s argument takes as a premise that inductive reasoning presupposes that the future will resemble the past. I explain why that claim is not plausible. The most plausible premise in the vicinity is that inductive reasoning from E to H presupposes that if E then H. I formulate and then refute a skeptical argument based on that premise. Central to my response is a psychological explanation for how people judge that if E then H without realizing that they thereby settled the matter rationally.


Human Rights In Chinese Tradition, Stephen C. Angle Dec 2017

Human Rights In Chinese Tradition, Stephen C. Angle

Stephen C. Angle

This chapter -- prepared for Sarah Biddulph and Joshua Rosenzweig , eds., Handbook on human rights in China (Edward Elgar, forthcoming) -- examines three different approaches: the Chinese tradition is (1) an obstacle to human rights, (2) an alternative to human rights, or (3) a source of human rights. While some scholars have insisted on one or another of these approaches, I will argue here that there is truth in all of them. Nothing about the Chinese tradition determines, once-and-for-all, what modern Chinese must think about human rights, but there is no question that it has had, and will continue to have, varying ...


Introduction To Discourse, Structure And Linguistic Choice By T. Price Caldwell, Robert J. Stainton Dec 2017

Introduction To Discourse, Structure And Linguistic Choice By T. Price Caldwell, Robert J. Stainton

Robert J. Stainton

No abstract provided.


Tian As Cosmos In Zhu Xi's Neo-Confucianism, Stephen C. Angle Dec 2017

Tian As Cosmos In Zhu Xi's Neo-Confucianism, Stephen C. Angle

Stephen C. Angle


Tian” is central to the metaphysics, cosmology, and ethics of the eight-hundred-year-long Chinese philosophical tradition we call “Neo-Confucianism,” but there is considerable confusion over what tian means—confusion which is exacerbated by its standard translation into English as “Heaven.” This essay analyzes the meaning of tian in the works of the most influential Neo-Confucian, Zhu Xi (1130-1200), presents a coherent interpretation that unifies the disparate aspects of the term’s meaning, and argues that “cosmos” does an excellent job of capturing this meaning, and therefore should be adopted as our translation of tian.


Norm-Expressivism And Regress, Attila Tanyi Nov 2017

Norm-Expressivism And Regress, Attila Tanyi

Attila Tanyi

This paper aims to investigate Allan Gibbard’s norm-expressivist account of normativity. In particular, the aim is to see whether Gibbard’s theory is able to account for the normativity of reason-claims. For this purpose, I first describe how I come to targeting Gibbard’s theory by setting out the main tenets of quasi-realism cum expressivism. After this, I provide a detailed interpretation of the relevant parts of Gibbard’s theory. I argue that the best reading of his account is the one that takes normativity to be carried by a controlled, coherent, comprehensive set of norms. Finally, I present ...


Consent, Kant, And The Ethics Of Debt, Kate Padgett-Walsh Nov 2017

Consent, Kant, And The Ethics Of Debt, Kate Padgett-Walsh

Kate Padgett-Walsh

The 2008 housing and financial crisis brought to light many ethically questionable lending and borrowing practices. As we learn more about what caused this crisis, it has become apparent that we need to think more carefully about the conditions under which can loans be ethically offered and accepted, but also about when it might be morally permissible to default on debts. I critique two distinct philosophical approaches to assessing the ethics of debt, arguing that both approaches are too simplistic because they focus only on individual borrowers and lenders. As a result, neither approach can adequately grasp the moral implications ...


Can One Love The Distant Other? Empathy, Affiliation, And Cosmopolitanism, Gregory R. Peterson Nov 2017

Can One Love The Distant Other? Empathy, Affiliation, And Cosmopolitanism, Gregory R. Peterson

Gregory Peterson

An ongoing debate in political and moral philosophy concerns the nature of international obligations. While cosmopolitans argue that duties of justice are independent of national borders, statists argue otherwise, sometimes basing their account on the limitations of our empathic concern, a line of argument found much earlier in Adam Smith. Although critics argue that empathy is neither necessary nor sufficient for morality, and although statists imply that psychological limitations of the kind that would be based in empathy prevent the realization of commitments to distant others beyond humanitarian aid, I argue that both these views are incorrect. While the possession ...


Useful Knowledge Ascriptions (Draft), Alexander Jackson Oct 2017

Useful Knowledge Ascriptions (Draft), Alexander Jackson

Alexander Jackson

Plausibly, the stakes in a practical task at hand can affect how people ascribe knowledge. I propose a new psychological account of the effect. My hypothesis is motivated by empirical research on how people’s judgements are sensitive to their social context. Specifically, people’s evaluations are sensitive to their ‘psychological distance’ from the scenarios they are considering. Experimental philosophy has found that what’s at stake for a fictional character in a fictional scenario has little effect on how participants ascribe knowledge to them. My hypothesis predicts this finding. The hypothesis also predicts that people do not ascribe knowledge ...


The Research Skills Of Undergraduate Philosophy Majors: Teaching Information Literacy, Heidi Gauder, Fred W. Jenkins Oct 2017

The Research Skills Of Undergraduate Philosophy Majors: Teaching Information Literacy, Heidi Gauder, Fred W. Jenkins

Heidi Gauder

This article presents a case study of how one school introduced a one-credit course for philosophy majors focused on effective searching for and critical evaluation of primary and secondary sources. The course curriculum is based on departmental learning outcomes and is also aligned with the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) standards.


Hans Urs Von Balthasar: A Primer, Thomas V. Gourlay 402884 Oct 2017

Hans Urs Von Balthasar: A Primer, Thomas V. Gourlay 402884

Thomas V. Gourlay

No abstract provided.


University Of Northern Iowa Youth Arts Summit: Mentoring And Empowering Youth Voice Through The Arts, Angela Waseskuk, Alyssa Bruecken, Heidi Fuchtman, Shauib Meacham, Emmett Phillips, Courtney Clausen, Wendy Miller Oct 2017

University Of Northern Iowa Youth Arts Summit: Mentoring And Empowering Youth Voice Through The Arts, Angela Waseskuk, Alyssa Bruecken, Heidi Fuchtman, Shauib Meacham, Emmett Phillips, Courtney Clausen, Wendy Miller

Angela Waseskuk

In the face of drastic cuts to both the arts and the humanities at the national and state levels, it is important to empower and give voice to young artists and creatives striving to impact society and their communities through their creative writing, visual images, music, and dance. Educational scholars such as Ruchi Agarwal-Rangnath call for empowering youth through facilitating change and giving voice to children and young adults in the face of adversity. This panel discussion speaks directly to ethical issues in advising and mentoring students in citizenship and community life, as well as, social responsibility in one’s ...


Addressing Wicked Problems In Practical Ways: Empowering Ethical Action In Higher Ed And Beyond, Cara B. Stone, Anne Marie Gruber Oct 2017

Addressing Wicked Problems In Practical Ways: Empowering Ethical Action In Higher Ed And Beyond, Cara B. Stone, Anne Marie Gruber

Anne Marie H. Gruber

This discussion-based workshop will engage faculty and students alike in identifying problem areas related to social responsibility and action. Using a “Wicked Problems” framework, the presenters will provide examples of and opportunities for participants to reflect on challenges they observe in their disciplines/professional lives and on their campuses. Wicked Problems are complex and multifaceted, do not have a simple description or solution, and “are different because traditional processes can’t resolve them” (Camillus, 2008). In a higher education context, faculty and students can address these problems but this will require “new ways of learning, new ways of working together ...


Marx's Democratic Critique Of Capitalism And Its Implications For A Viable Socialism, C. David Schweickart Oct 2017

Marx's Democratic Critique Of Capitalism And Its Implications For A Viable Socialism, C. David Schweickart

David Schweickart

This paper argues that Marx’s critique of capitalism is not, as commonly believed, a critique of the “free market.” I argue that the “market” under capitalism should be understood as a three-fold market—for goods and services, for labor and for capital. I argue that Marx’s critique is essentially a critique of the latter two markets, and not the first. Hence theoretical space opens up for “market socialism.” I proceed to elaborate briefly what specific institutions might comprise an economically viable socialism that would not be vulnerable to Marx’s critique.


Fortifying The Self-Defense Justification Of Punishment, Zac Cogley Sep 2017

Fortifying The Self-Defense Justification Of Punishment, Zac Cogley

Zac Cogley

David Boonin has recently advanced several challenges to the self-defense justification of punishment. Boonin argues that the self-defense justification of punishment justifies punishing the innocent, justifies disproportionate punishment, cannot account for mitigating excuses, and does not justify intentionally harming offenders as we do when we punish them. In this paper, I argue that the self-defense justification, suitably understood, can avoid all of these problems. To help demonstrate the self-defense theory’s attraction, I also develop some contrasts between the self-defense justification, Warren Quinn’s better known ‘auto-retaliator’ argument, and desert-based justifications of punishment. In sum, I show that the self-defense ...


Recognition Within The Limits Of Reason: Remarks On Pippin’S Hegel’S Practical Philosophy, David Ingram Sep 2017

Recognition Within The Limits Of Reason: Remarks On Pippin’S Hegel’S Practical Philosophy, David Ingram

David Ingram

Since the publication of Charles Taylor’s Multiculturalism and the Politics of Recognition in 1989,[1] the concept of recognition has re-emerged as a central if not dominant category of moral and political philosophy. [1] C. Taylor, “The Politics of Recognition,” in A. Gutmann (ed.), Multiculturalism: Examining the Politics of Recognition (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1994), pp. 25-73.


Toward A Cleaner Whiteness: New Racial Identities, David Ingram Sep 2017

Toward A Cleaner Whiteness: New Racial Identities, David Ingram

David Ingram

The article re-examines racial and ethnic identity within the context of pedagogical attempts to instill a positive white identity in white students who are conscious of the history of white racism and white privilege. The paper draws heavily from whiteness studies and developmental cognitive science in arguing (against Henry Giroux and Stuart Hall) that a positive notion of white identity, however postmodern its construction, is an oxymoron, since whiteness designates less a cultural/ethnic ethos and meaningful way of life than a pathological structure of privilege and narrowminded cognitive habitus.


The Public Sphere As Site Of Emancipation And Enlightenment: A Discourse Theoretic Critique Of Digital Communication, David Ingram, Asaf Bar-Tura Sep 2017

The Public Sphere As Site Of Emancipation And Enlightenment: A Discourse Theoretic Critique Of Digital Communication, David Ingram, Asaf Bar-Tura

David Ingram

Habermas claims that an inclusive public sphere is the only deliberative forum for generating public opinion that satisfies the epistemic and normative conditions underlying legitimate decision-making. He adds that digital technologies and other mass media need not undermine – but can extend – rational deliberation when properly instituted. This paper draws from social epistemology and technology studies to demonstrate the epistemic and normative limitations of this extension. We argue that current online communication structures fall short of satisfying the required epistemic and normative conditions. Furthermore, the extent to which Internet-based communications contribute to legitimate democratic opinion and will formation depends on the ...


Late Pragmatism, Logical Positivism, And Their Aftermath, David Ingram Sep 2017

Late Pragmatism, Logical Positivism, And Their Aftermath, David Ingram

David Ingram

Developments in Anglo-American philosophy during the first half of the 20th Century closely tracked developments that were occurring in continental philosophy during this period. This should not surprise us. Aside from the fertile communication between these ostensibly separate traditions, both were responding to problems associated with the rise of mass society. Rabid nationalism, corporate statism, and totalitarianism (Left and Right) posed a profound challenge to the idealistic rationalism of neo-Kantian and neo-Hegelian philosophies. The decline of the individual – classically conceived by the 18th-century Enlightenment as a self-determining agent – provoked strong reactions. While some philosophical tendencies sought to re-conceive the relationship ...


Group Rights: A Defense, David Ingram Sep 2017

Group Rights: A Defense, David Ingram

David Ingram

Human rights belong to individuals in virtue of their common humanity. Yet it is an important question whether human rights entail or comport with the possession of what I call group-specific rights (sometimes referred to as collective rights), or rights that individuals possess only because they belong to a particular group. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) says they do. Article 15 asserts the right to nationality, or citizenship. Unless one believes that the only citizenship compatible with a universal human rights regime is cosmopolitan citizenship in a world state – a conception of citizenship that is not countenanced by ...


Sacramental Song: Theological Imagination In The Religious Music Of American Pagans, Christopher W. Chase Sep 2017

Sacramental Song: Theological Imagination In The Religious Music Of American Pagans, Christopher W. Chase

Christopher Chase

There can be no doubt that the cultural study of music is experiencing something of a renaissance. Over the past decade, works by Stephen Marini, Miriam Ghazza, Michael D. McNally, Tricia Rose, David W. Stowe, Mark Slobin, Susan McClary and Michael D. Largey have largely redefined the way that scholars talk and write about the roles played by music in people's lives.


It's About This Nail: Ethics, Justice, And Architecture's Material Realization, Gregory S. Palermo Sep 2017

It's About This Nail: Ethics, Justice, And Architecture's Material Realization, Gregory S. Palermo

Gregory Palermo

No abstract provided.


“In Space” Or “As Space”: Three Dimensions Or Not?, Charles H. Smith Aug 2017

“In Space” Or “As Space”: Three Dimensions Or Not?, Charles H. Smith

Charles H. Smith

First Paragraph:
Alfred Russel Wallace (1823 – 1913), the celebrated British naturalist and social critic, is best known for his independent discovery of the principle of natural selection, and for his key role in the development of the field of evolutionary biogeography.  But his interests extended to well beyond these subjects: he was also an important anthropologist, physical geographer, land reform theorist, social critic, and early exobiologist.  By the end of his life he was one of the most respected scientists in the world – and this, despite his concurrent attachment to a number of less mainstream side-infatuations including spiritualism, anti-vaccinationism, and ...


Four Hours Passed From 8am Today Until Noon, Alexander Jackson Aug 2017

Four Hours Passed From 8am Today Until Noon, Alexander Jackson

Alexander Jackson

I explore a common-sense view of time’s passage, namely: what it is for time to pass is for particular amounts of time to pass between pairs of times. On this proposal, it is a fundamental fact that four hours passed from 8am today until noon, for example. First I clear up puzzlement about the rate of time’s passage. Time passes at lots of rates, but given that the fundamental facts about passage all take the proposed form, none of those rates metaphysically illuminates what it is for time to pass. Second, I show that an A-theory of time ...


Logical Form And The Vernacular Revisited, Andrew Botterell, Robert J. Stainton Aug 2017

Logical Form And The Vernacular Revisited, Andrew Botterell, Robert J. Stainton

Robert J. Stainton

We revisit a debate initiated some fifteen years ago by Ray Elugardo and Robert Stainton about the domain of arguments. Our main result is that arguments are not exclusively sets of linguistic expressions. Instead, as we put it, some non-linguistic items have ‘logical form’. The crucial examples are arguments, both deductive and inductive, made with unembedded words and phrases.


The Feferman-Vaught Theorem, Mostafa Mirabi Aug 2017

The Feferman-Vaught Theorem, Mostafa Mirabi

Mostafa Mirabi

This paper aims to provide an exposition of the Feferman-Vaught theorem, closely following the presentation in Hodges [1] and Chang-Keisler [2].


The New Mechanical Philosophy, Stuart Glennan Jul 2017

The New Mechanical Philosophy, Stuart Glennan

Stuart Glennan

The New Mechanical Philosophy argues for a new image of nature and of science--one that understands both natural and social phenomena to be the product of mechanisms, and that casts the work of science as an effort to discover and understand those mechanisms. Drawing on an expanding literature on mechanisms in physical, life, and social sciences, Stuart Glennan offers an account of the nature of mechanisms and of the models used to represent them. A key quality of mechanisms is that they are particulars - located at different places and times, with no one just like another. The crux of the ...


Leituras Do Símbolo Do Infinito.Pdf, Paulo Ferreira Da Cunha Jul 2017

Leituras Do Símbolo Do Infinito.Pdf, Paulo Ferreira Da Cunha

Paulo Ferreira da Cunha

Algumas breves considerações pósdisciplinares sobre o símbolo do Infinito, comemorando os 8 anos de "As Artes entre as Letras".


The Causal Indicator Analysis Of Knowledge, Steven Luper Jul 2017

The Causal Indicator Analysis Of Knowledge, Steven Luper

Steven Luper

In this paper I want to describe and motivate an approach to knowledge that I call the Causal Indicator Analysis. My strategy will be to sketch (in Part I) the main features of an adequate account of knowledge, then use my sketch (in Part II) to reveal some of the faults of some of the main anal- yses defended today. I will be particularly interested in discussing the work of Fred Dretske, whose views have significantly influenced my own. With these tasks behind me, I will offer my own account in Part III, and argue that it has the features ...


Introduction To Marx And Modern Political Theory: From Hobbes To Contemporary Feminism, Philip J. Kain Jul 2017

Introduction To Marx And Modern Political Theory: From Hobbes To Contemporary Feminism, Philip J. Kain

Philip J. Kain

I first began to study Marx some twenty-three years ago. In those days there were many things that made it easy to become interested in Marx: among them the political ferment of the late 1960s and the fact that at the University of California at San Diego, where I was a graduate student, there were several important and interesting Marxists - Fredric Jameson, Herbert Marcuse, and Stanley Moore. The latter two were my teachers in the Philosophy Department, and the latter, to whom this book is dedicated, became my dissertation director. Moreover, the spirit of Marx was in the air and ...