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Articles 1 - 30 of 1518

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Moral Judgment: Why Should We Judge And Who Has The Right To?, Megan Moulton Apr 2018

Moral Judgment: Why Should We Judge And Who Has The Right To?, Megan Moulton

Carroll College Student Undergraduate Research Festival

In this presentation, I explore the origin of the moral authority to judge another person’s wrong actions through the relationships to those involved in the situation. I also argue that moral authority has an aspect grounded in past experience with similar situations and the ability to understand what it means to be held and to hold another morally responsible. The purpose of defining moral authority and its application is determined to be for the moral growth of the perpetrator, until further development is denied, in which case the possible occurrence of manipulation to stay in relation with the unchanging ...


Science Fiction And Models Of Humanity, Emily Holland Apr 2018

Science Fiction And Models Of Humanity, Emily Holland

Carroll College Student Undergraduate Research Festival

Science Fiction as a literary genre offers a unique platform for social commentary. It presents plausible scientific advancements as a reality, and then uses this possible future to enter the discussion on society’s current model of humanity. One of the first works of Science Fiction, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; or The Modern Prometheus, published in 1818, was written in a time overflowing with new scientific theories and advancements. Two such sciences, galvanism and vitalism, aimed to identify the principle of life in the human body. At the same time, pseudo-psychological theories discussed the psychological aspects of what we call ...


Commitment In Unconventional Relationships, Sarah Hayden Apr 2018

Commitment In Unconventional Relationships, Sarah Hayden

Carroll College Student Undergraduate Research Festival

This research is the study and comparison of two philosopher couples: Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, and John Stuart Mill and Harriet Taylor. Both partnerships exhibit characteristics of an unconventional relationship. Sartre and de Beauvoir had an open relationship, in which both partners were free to commit unlimited adultery. Mill and Taylor were emotionally committed to each other, while Taylor was legally bound to another man. This research examines the individual decisions and consequences of challenging the institution of marriage set by societal norms. With the current growth of unconventional relationships, whether open, homosexual, or interracial, it is especially ...


"Utopian Bureaucracy: Collective Empowerment Or Tyrannical Control?”, Callie Glenn Apr 2018

"Utopian Bureaucracy: Collective Empowerment Or Tyrannical Control?”, Callie Glenn

Carroll College Student Undergraduate Research Festival

The evolution of social structures has led to the development of many styles of government, one of them being bureaucracy. One might think that assigning a larger number of people to more specific tasks allows for increased involvement with the governance of your own society, and therefore a decreased chance of corruption or tyranny. While this may be true, these potential benefits come with a dark disfiguration of the individuals within this system, altering the development of their own humanity. This danger to humanity has been identified by a number of influential figures, including Thomas More and Hannah Arendt. More ...


Paradigms And Paleoartists: How Our Perception Of Dinosaurs Forms, Jordan C. Oldham Apr 2018

Paradigms And Paleoartists: How Our Perception Of Dinosaurs Forms, Jordan C. Oldham

The Research and Scholarship Symposium

Thomas Kuhn in his famous work The Structure of Scientific Revolutions put forth his idea about how science changes. Kuhn thought that science changed by scientific revolutions brought on by an anomaly. After the anomaly, a crisis point would ensue as more scientists would research the anomaly. While in the process of research they would abandon the old paradigm in favor of one that would explain the anomaly. Not all anomalies create a crisis, but can rather result in a paradigm shift. These shifts occur within the old paradigm, and do not led to the formation of a new paradigm ...


The Unifying Strands: Formalism And Gestalt Theory Span Centuries Of Music Philosophy, Amanda N. Staufer Apr 2018

The Unifying Strands: Formalism And Gestalt Theory Span Centuries Of Music Philosophy, Amanda N. Staufer

The Research and Scholarship Symposium

In every age, musicians and philosophers deal with inquiries concerning musical meaning and the effect of music on the listener. Musical formalism and Gestalt theory—two theories in musical aesthetics—demonstrate that aspects of musical perception and experience are enduring and comprehensive. Musical formalism is the theory that music’s nature is innate, self-evident, able to be systematically deduced, and rational. According to formalism, musical meaning is defined by things objectively ‘there’ in the music, musical experience relies on cognition, and music is less a matter of sense than of mind. Gestalt Theory holds that music is a unified totality ...


̶T̶H̶E̶ ̶ A Possibility For Light, Daniel Burmester Mar 2018

̶T̶H̶E̶ ̶ A Possibility For Light, Daniel Burmester

Lesley University Community of Scholars Day

How can an educator help young people feel a reverence for and connection with the world? I asked myself this three years ago as I began thinking about how, as an educator, I could better the world. I believe that harmful action on our world can occur when reverence for and connection with it erodes or has never given a chance to flourish. Researchers in cognitive psychology have suggested that experiencing the emotion awe allows people to feel greater connections with elements of our world. (Keltner, 2016; Shiota, Keltner, & Mossman, 2007) My work at Lesley focuses on the emotion awe ...


Discovering The Current Opinions Of The Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual, Transgender, And Questioning Individuals Towards The Evangelical Protestant Churches, Joseph Dagostino Mar 2018

Discovering The Current Opinions Of The Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual, Transgender, And Questioning Individuals Towards The Evangelical Protestant Churches, Joseph Dagostino

Scholar Week 2016 - present

This research addressed the current opinions held by the LGBTQ community toward Evangelical Protestant churches. As a Pastor of a church that is concerned about this subject, the researcher developed and implemented a survey instrument that attempted to discover the over-all opinions, differences among sexual orientations in opinions, factors that encouraged and discouraged LGBTQ individuals’ involvement within Evangelical Protestant churches, and various levels of involvement by the participants in Evangelical Protestant churches. The researcher used the services of Survey Gizmo to distribute the survey tool amongst those self-identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning to complete the survey instrument ...


Panel Ii. Epistemic Privilege, Standpoint Epistemology, And The Human Sciences, Kai Peattie Mar 2018

Panel Ii. Epistemic Privilege, Standpoint Epistemology, And The Human Sciences, Kai Peattie

the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Student Conference

No abstract provided.


Soft Power Of Deference: An Analysis Of A Key Pillar Of Moral Authority, Luke Kendall Jan 2018

Soft Power Of Deference: An Analysis Of A Key Pillar Of Moral Authority, Luke Kendall

Power, Voice, Mandate: Moral Authority in the Contemporary Age

When faced with the issue of leadership, we are tasked with finding when it is appropriate to follow. In following, we are deferring our own authority in favor of another’s. The sliding scale of authority teeters between complacency and anarchy, providing a challenge as to where we can find the effective middle ground for a functioning society. This paper breaks down the parts of authority and discusses the necessity of community deference, namely with respect to the rise of a counter-cultural moral authority that seeks to better humanity. Moral authorities rely on a loyal following, from Nelson Mandela’s ...


Gadflies Nibbling, Branan Mull Jan 2018

Gadflies Nibbling, Branan Mull

Power, Voice, Mandate: Moral Authority in the Contemporary Age

In this paper I examine issues related to public and private “moral authority”, and how this public moral authority interferes with the exercise of private moral authority. This paper explores what public authority is, and why that while in other field it can properly exist, in terms of morality it by its very existence is problematic because 1) it interferes with the exercise of reason in determining ethical action and 2) because it treats the public moral authority as something other than a human being. I then look to several ethical dilemmas as presented by several philosophers and show how ...


Moral Judgment: Why Should We Judge And Who Has The Right To?, Megan Moulton Jan 2018

Moral Judgment: Why Should We Judge And Who Has The Right To?, Megan Moulton

Power, Voice, Mandate: Moral Authority in the Contemporary Age

In this paper, I explore the origin of the moral authority to judge another person’s wrong actions through the relationships to those involved in the situation. I also argue that moral authority has an aspect grounded in past experience with similar situations and the ability to understand what it means to be held and to hold another morally responsible. The purpose of defining moral authority and its application is determined to be for the moral growth of the perpetrator, until further development is denied, in which case the possible occurrence of manipulation to stay in relation with the unchanging ...


Moral Authority In Scientific Research, Evelyn Sowers Jan 2018

Moral Authority In Scientific Research, Evelyn Sowers

Power, Voice, Mandate: Moral Authority in the Contemporary Age

This paper addresses the issue of applying moral limitations to modern scientific research and who or what has the authority to do so. It examines two opposing positions on the issue: (1) that moral authority over scientific research should be held by society and (2) that moral authority over scientific research should be held by the scientific community. This argument centers around the nature of societal and scientific morality, and how allowing either to hold authority would affect the progression of research. Overall, it concludes that moral authority over scientific research must come from within the scientific community.


Go Your Own Way: The Producer As Moral Author In Entertainment, Taryn Stewart Jan 2018

Go Your Own Way: The Producer As Moral Author In Entertainment, Taryn Stewart

Power, Voice, Mandate: Moral Authority in the Contemporary Age

Moral authority is a moral derivative of authority, which in turn is connected to religion and tradition. In today’s Western society, both religion and tradition are fragmented in our increasingly diverse society. This is nowhere more apparent than it is in entertainment. So where does moral authority lie in entertainment? Producers in entertainment hold moral authority. Authority is the ability to create action, versus power, which is the ability to force action. Because producers create content, which in turn has the potential to enact change, they possess moral authority. Different producers have differing amounts of moral authority. Disney has ...


Correctional Officers, Step Off The Treadmill Of Power: The Lack Of Moral Authority In U.S. Correctional Officers, Kavida Naidu Jan 2018

Correctional Officers, Step Off The Treadmill Of Power: The Lack Of Moral Authority In U.S. Correctional Officers, Kavida Naidu

Power, Voice, Mandate: Moral Authority in the Contemporary Age

The abuse of authority and power is commonly encountered in different institutions. Similarly, prisons are not immune to the overuse of authority and power. Correctional officers exercise their authority on inmates in ways that result in a prison culture, which is filled with violence and dehumanization. Correctional officers often consider inmates as morally inferior beings, who deserve to be punished beyond sentence, for the crimes that they have committed are inexcusable. However, the abrasive environment of prisons places correctional officers in a situation where they eventually adopt the prison identity and find themselves trapped in this brutish incarcerated culture. This ...


Moral Authority And Artificial Intelligence, Jacob Souza Jan 2018

Moral Authority And Artificial Intelligence, Jacob Souza

Power, Voice, Mandate: Moral Authority in the Contemporary Age

This paper looks at the relationship between Artificial intelligence and moral authority. It explores the important concepts related to moral authority, such as power, authority, responsibility, and morality, but also defines what a thinking machine will look like in human society. What the paper determines is that it is difficult to trust machines that do not show emotion, but thinking machines without emotion will still have an important role in society and that when emotional AIs are achievable, they will be able to achieve moral authority.


Being A Part Of Something Bigger: How Leaders Affect Morality, Abra Casey Jan 2018

Being A Part Of Something Bigger: How Leaders Affect Morality, Abra Casey

Power, Voice, Mandate: Moral Authority in the Contemporary Age

If a person is in a position of leadership then is he or she also responsible to uphold the moral values of the group? This paper argues that people, they are not responsible for morality, rather they become the voice of morality. This is to say that leaders should not develop a new morality on behalf of their group. When leaders do create their own version of morality instead of adhering to an inherent and objective truth such as the golden rule, then their actions ultimately become immoral. Not all leaders actually have this responsibility however. For example, there are ...


The Nature Of Authority In Nature, Sean Cleary Jan 2018

The Nature Of Authority In Nature, Sean Cleary

Power, Voice, Mandate: Moral Authority in the Contemporary Age

Everything from the clothes we wear to the food we eat is related to the natural world around us. Why do we Montana residents where a fluffy jacket while walking to class in the middle of December? What makes us decide on athletic shorts in July? Although these questions offer a simple response: Montana winters are colder than a Tibetan tin toilet top and Montana summers are hotter than hells pepper patch, they indicate that the natural world influences the way we act on a daily basis. We certainly have the freedom to rock a bikini in the freezing cold ...


Sources Of Moral Authority: Thinking Beyond Religion And Politics, Rhiannon B. Sturgess Jan 2018

Sources Of Moral Authority: Thinking Beyond Religion And Politics, Rhiannon B. Sturgess

Power, Voice, Mandate: Moral Authority in the Contemporary Age

Religion and politics served as sources of moral authority for centuries, but are limited as such, especially in modern, diverse societies like the United States. Many people feel as though they are not understood, and that their traditional beliefs are not considered when moral decisions are made. Such feelings can incite contempt between people who would otherwise be friends. This lack of harmony can lead to civil unrest and an unhappy society. Therefore, it is important that we strive for a source of moral authority that treats all people as equals. Because not all people can be assumed to operate ...


Power Versus Authority: Sacrifice Lied Or Applied?, Conor Coutts Jan 2018

Power Versus Authority: Sacrifice Lied Or Applied?, Conor Coutts

Power, Voice, Mandate: Moral Authority in the Contemporary Age

We live in an age that is both desperate for moral authority while simultaneously not knowing what genuine moral authority is. Authority from merely a standard of wealth and political office is not morally legitimate but instead merely powerful. I seek to differentiate between power and authority, asserting that it is through a sense of sacrifice and a disregard for popularity that moral authority is attained. Looking to the Abrahamic faiths that assert such a sacrifice and humility, the life of Christ and subsequent Christian tradition serve as an ideal practice of this. Such a practice of authority and how ...


Empathy, Asymmetrical Reciprocity, And The Ethics Of Mental Health Care, Andrew Molas Jan 2018

Empathy, Asymmetrical Reciprocity, And The Ethics Of Mental Health Care, Andrew Molas

The Canadian Society for Study of Practical Ethics / Société Canadienne Pour L'étude De L'éthique Appliquée — SCEEA

I discuss Young’s “asymmetrical reciprocity” and apply it to an ethics of mental health care. Due to its emphasis on engaging with others through respectful dialogue in an inclusive manner, asymmetrical reciprocity serves as an appropriate framework for guiding caregivers to interact with their patients and to understand them in a morally responsible and appropriate manner. In Section 1, I define empathy and explain its benefits in the context of mental health care. In Section 2, I discuss two potential problems surrounding empathy: the difficulty of perspective-taking and “compassion fatigue.” In Section 3, I argue that these issues can ...


The Myth Of Progress? Critical Theory And The Debate Over Progress, John Lundy Jan 2018

The Myth Of Progress? Critical Theory And The Debate Over Progress, John Lundy

The Canadian Society for Study of Practical Ethics / Société Canadienne Pour L'étude De L'éthique Appliquée — SCEEA

Philosophy as a discipline has generally claimed that human beings have a capacity called practical reason that allows us to address moral-practical questions. Applied to historical change, this yields an account of progress as a process of rationalization. The 20th century has produced a long line of radical critiques of this idea of progress. My central aim is to defend contemporary critical theory’s reliance on the idea of progress as an emancipatory process of rationalization. Because she engages deeply and directly with the accounts of progress I seek to defend, my focus is on Amy Allen’s critique ...


Aboriginal Title Or Legal Personhood For Land?, Melany Banks Jan 2018

Aboriginal Title Or Legal Personhood For Land?, Melany Banks

The Canadian Society for Study of Practical Ethics / Société Canadienne Pour L'étude De L'éthique Appliquée — SCEEA

In 1983, British Columbia granted Carrier Lumber Ltd a license to engage in industrial logging within the territory of the Tsilhqot’in Nation. The Xeni Gwet’in First Nations government (part of Tsilhqot’in Nation) sought an injunction to halt Carrier. For the Xeni Gwent’in, the proposed logging would destroy the forest in which they lived and hunted. In order to gain the power to stop the proposed logging, the Xeni Gwet’in fought for a declaration of Aboriginal Title. After a lengthy trial, the Supreme Court granted their claim. This may sound like a story about victory for ...


Genetic Discrimination, Life Insurance, And Justice As Fairness, Ozan Gurcan Jan 2018

Genetic Discrimination, Life Insurance, And Justice As Fairness, Ozan Gurcan

The Canadian Society for Study of Practical Ethics / Société Canadienne Pour L'étude De L'éthique Appliquée — SCEEA

In this paper, I use justice as fairness (JAF) to inquire whether any issues of liberal justice are raised by the practice of genetic discrimination in society, in particular from the standpoint of life insurance pricing in Canada. I present three ways in which JAF may apply. First and foremost, Rawls’ negative thesis can be interpreted to say that one’s genetic characteristics are morally arbitrary and therefore persons do not deserve to be advantaged or disadvantaged by the basic structure of society based on these characteristics. Second, as James W. Nickel observes, Rawls’ principle of equal basic liberties can ...


Painful Virtue, Marginalisation, And Resistance, Jordan Joseph Wadden Jan 2018

Painful Virtue, Marginalisation, And Resistance, Jordan Joseph Wadden

The Canadian Society for Study of Practical Ethics / Société Canadienne Pour L'étude De L'éthique Appliquée — SCEEA

This paper argues a potentially controversial thesis in virtue ethics, i.e., in situations of oppression and marginalisation, it is better to be a person of atypical virtue, one who has struggled to resist oppressive circumstances, than it is to be a traditionally defined virtuous agent. As such, those who have been through a tragic dilemma (or several) are more important for successful resistance movements than their traditionally defined counterparts. This paper does not romanticise oppressive situations or their influence on some individuals developing virtuous actions and behaviours. Instead, it acknowledges that these are tragic circumstances that permanently affect some ...


Human Development, Human Rights, And The 50th Anniversary Of Populorum Progressio, Ellen Maccarone Nov 2017

Human Development, Human Rights, And The 50th Anniversary Of Populorum Progressio, Ellen Maccarone

The Social Practice of Human Rights: Charting the Frontiers of Research and Advocacy

At the 50th anniversary of the encyclical Populorum Progressio, we have a critical opportunity to bring Paul VI’s insights to the social practice of human rights. The development of peoples discussed by the encyclical isolates areas of significant concern to the Church and humanity more broadly. This, however, is not to say that there are not other issues overlooked in Populorum Progressio that also need to be addressed.

In this paper I argue that the understanding of human development found in Populorum Progressio serves as an important yet sometimes overlooked foundation in Catholic social teaching for the advancement ...


Addressing Wicked Problems In Practical Ways: Empowering Ethical Action In Higher Ed And Beyond, Cara B. Stone, Anne Marie Gruber Sep 2017

Addressing Wicked Problems In Practical Ways: Empowering Ethical Action In Higher Ed And Beyond, Cara B. Stone, Anne Marie Gruber

Ethics Conference

This discussion-based workshop will engage faculty and students alike in identifying problem areas related to social responsibility and action. Using a “Wicked Problems” framework, the presenters will provide examples of and opportunities for participants to reflect on challenges they observe in their disciplines/professional lives and on their campuses. Wicked Problems are complex and multifaceted, do not have a simple description or solution, and “are different because traditional processes can’t resolve them” (Camillus, 2008). In a higher education context, faculty and students can address these problems but this will require “new ways of learning, new ways of working together ...


Culturally Competent Communication, Tara Thomas, Stephanie Mohorne Sep 2017

Culturally Competent Communication, Tara Thomas, Stephanie Mohorne

Ethics Conference

Culturally-competent communication is necessary to engage all community stakeholders. Tara Thomas and Stephanie Mohorne will explain in a one-hour, interactive session how Waterloo Schools applies this strategy to effectively reach its audience—students, staff, families and the community in the 7th largest, and one of the most diverse, school districts in Iowa. Thomas, a former television news anchor and reporter, will give specific examples of how sharing messages with the media and, in turn, the public needs to be a carefully-guided process based on factors like race and socio-economic status. Mohorne, a longtime educational leader and bi-racial daughter of a ...


Perception Of 3d Symmetrical And Near-Symmetrical Shapes, Vijai Jayadevan, Aaron Michaux, Edward Delp, Zygmunt Pizlo May 2017

Perception Of 3d Symmetrical And Near-Symmetrical Shapes, Vijai Jayadevan, Aaron Michaux, Edward Delp, Zygmunt Pizlo

MODVIS Workshop

No abstract provided.


Is Security A Conversation-Stopper?, Jonathan C. Herington Apr 2017

Is Security A Conversation-Stopper?, Jonathan C. Herington

Center for Engagement and Community Development

Security is a politically powerful concept. When someone claims that their security is threatened, it often feels as if we should stop talking and start acting. This is a mistake. The ambiguity of "security" requires us to ask: What goods do we want to secure? How much insecurity are we willing to tolerate? What other values are we willing to sacrifice in order to secure those goods? The invocation of security is just the beginning of the conversation.