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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Commentary On “The Strategic Formulation Of Abductive Arguments In Everyday Reasoning”, John R. Welch May 2016

Commentary On “The Strategic Formulation Of Abductive Arguments In Everyday Reasoning”, John R. Welch

OSSA Conference Archive

No abstract provided.


Commentary On “Compassion, Authority And Baby Talk: Prosody And Objectivity", Beth Innocenti May 2016

Commentary On “Compassion, Authority And Baby Talk: Prosody And Objectivity", Beth Innocenti

OSSA Conference Archive

No abstract provided.


Commentary On Pushing The Bounds Of Rationality: Argumentation And Extended Cognition, G.C. Goddu May 2016

Commentary On Pushing The Bounds Of Rationality: Argumentation And Extended Cognition, G.C. Goddu

OSSA Conference Archive

No abstract provided.


Commentary On Khameiel Al Tamimi's "Evaluating Narrative Arguments", Paula Olmos May 2016

Commentary On Khameiel Al Tamimi's "Evaluating Narrative Arguments", Paula Olmos

OSSA Conference Archive

No abstract provided.


Commentary On The Emotional Life Of Reason: Exploring Conceptions Of Objectivity, Moira Howes May 2016

Commentary On The Emotional Life Of Reason: Exploring Conceptions Of Objectivity, Moira Howes

OSSA Conference Archive

Robert Pinto and Laura Pinto advance a non-binary account of reason and emotion in the reasoning process and argue for a naturalistic understanding of objectivity that will allow for the evaluation of emotions as reasonable. Pinto and Pinto’s promising argument generates important and productive lines of inquiry. I suggest a few such lines of inquiry, including the idea that it may be important to support reflexivity and interpretive community with equanimity; that we should further examine the potential of new ideals of objectivity that explicitly incorporate emotion and virtue; and finally, that we should craft methodologies to deepen our ...


Commentary On Michael Yong-Set's Ludological Approach To Argumentation, Daniel H. Cohen May 2016

Commentary On Michael Yong-Set's Ludological Approach To Argumentation, Daniel H. Cohen

OSSA Conference Archive

Although Michael Yong-Set's proposal to approach argumentation theory from a ludological perspective is not yet sufficiently developed to warrant adopting it, there is enough to warrant exploring it further – which is all the reception it needs at this point.


Commentary On Ami Mamolo On Argumentation And Infinity, Daniel H. Cohen May 2016

Commentary On Ami Mamolo On Argumentation And Infinity, Daniel H. Cohen

OSSA Conference Archive

There is more to mathematics than proofs; there are also arguments, which means that mathematicians are human arguers complete with their biases. Among those biases is a preference for beauty, It is a bias insofar as it is a deaprture from objectivity, but it is benign, accounting for the popularity of Cantor's "Paradise" of non-denumerable infinities as a travel destination for mathematicians and the relatively little interest in Robinson's infinitesimals.


Argumentation In Large, Complex Practices, Mark Aakhus, Paul Ziek, Punit Dadlani May 2016

Argumentation In Large, Complex Practices, Mark Aakhus, Paul Ziek, Punit Dadlani

OSSA Conference Archive

Differences arise in macro-activities, such as the production of energy, food, and healthcare, where the management of these differences happens in polylogues as many actors pursue scores of positions on a variety of issues in numerous venues. Polylogues are essential to the large-scale practices that organize macro-activities but present significant challenges for argumentation theory and research. Key to the challenge is conceptualizing the variety of argumentative roles that go beyond the classic normative definition of protagonist and antagonist. A macroscope is devised for identifying argumentative roles in the communicative work of organizations, and the communicative work of the network of ...


Commentary On “Where Is The Reasonable?”, Jean Goodwin May 2016

Commentary On “Where Is The Reasonable?”, Jean Goodwin

OSSA Conference Archive

No abstract provided.


Commentary On “Inducing A Sympathetic (Empathic) Reception For Exhortation”, Sally Jackson May 2016

Commentary On “Inducing A Sympathetic (Empathic) Reception For Exhortation”, Sally Jackson

OSSA Conference Archive

People often have conflicting values, goals, and beliefs, and these present special challenges for those who seek to influence them. Kauffeld and Innocenti suggest that these situations of conflictedness are opportunities for a speaker to “exhort” the audience to resolve the conflict in favor of their highest principle. Exhortation, in their view, has high-mindedness as a constitutive feature. At Cooper Union, Lincoln exhorted Republicans to face their fear of disunion and steadfastly maintain the evil of slavery—a confirming example for the Kauffeld and Innocenti account. But looking at a broader set of examples, it seems clear that exhortations do ...


Commentary On ‘Approaching Logos Among Reason, Rationality And Reasonable’, Ralph Johnson May 2016

Commentary On ‘Approaching Logos Among Reason, Rationality And Reasonable’, Ralph Johnson

OSSA Conference Archive

No abstract provided.


Commentary On Paul L. Simard Smith’S “Pluralism As A Bias Mitigation Strategy”, Marcin Lewinski May 2016

Commentary On Paul L. Simard Smith’S “Pluralism As A Bias Mitigation Strategy”, Marcin Lewinski

OSSA Conference Archive

No abstract provided.


Commentary On “On Appeals To (Visual) Models”: Appeals To Visual Models – An Epistemological Reconstruction Of An Argument Type, Christoph Lumer May 2016

Commentary On “On Appeals To (Visual) Models”: Appeals To Visual Models – An Epistemological Reconstruction Of An Argument Type, Christoph Lumer

OSSA Conference Archive

No abstract provided.


Commentary On "Why Not Teach Critical Thinking" By B. Hamby, Kevin Possin May 2016

Commentary On "Why Not Teach Critical Thinking" By B. Hamby, Kevin Possin

OSSA Conference Archive

Some ways of teaching critical thinking seem destine to failure, e.g.,CT across the curriculum, and some obstacles to acquiring CT skills seem insurmountable, e.g., cognitive biases, but some approaches to teaching and learning to think critically, discussed in this article, can mitigate those biases and be demonstrably successful.


Commentary To David Hitchcock's "Transsubjectivity", Harald R. Wohlrapp May 2016

Commentary To David Hitchcock's "Transsubjectivity", Harald R. Wohlrapp

OSSA Conference Archive

No abstract provided.


Reply To Commentary On "The Method Of Relevant Variables, Objectivity, And Bias", James B. Freeman May 2016

Reply To Commentary On "The Method Of Relevant Variables, Objectivity, And Bias", James B. Freeman

OSSA Conference Archive

No abstract provided.


Reply To Commentary On Uses Of Arguments From Definition In Children's Argumentation, Rebecca G. Schär May 2016

Reply To Commentary On Uses Of Arguments From Definition In Children's Argumentation, Rebecca G. Schär

OSSA Conference Archive

No abstract provided.


Reply To David Godden’S Commentary On “Splitting A Difference Of Opinion”, Jan Albert Van Laar, Erik C W Krabbe May 2016

Reply To David Godden’S Commentary On “Splitting A Difference Of Opinion”, Jan Albert Van Laar, Erik C W Krabbe

OSSA Conference Archive

No abstract provided.


Reply To Commentary On "Ethical Argumentation, Objectivity, And Bias", Derek Allen May 2016

Reply To Commentary On "Ethical Argumentation, Objectivity, And Bias", Derek Allen

OSSA Conference Archive

No abstract provided.


Reply To Commentary On Thinking Critically About Beliefs It’S Hard To Think Critically About, Justine M. Kingsbury, Tracy Bowell May 2016

Reply To Commentary On Thinking Critically About Beliefs It’S Hard To Think Critically About, Justine M. Kingsbury, Tracy Bowell

OSSA Conference Archive

No abstract provided.


Reply To “Macpherson’ Commentary On Santibanez’S “Strategically Wrong: Bias And Argumentation”, Cristian Santibanez Yanez May 2016

Reply To “Macpherson’ Commentary On Santibanez’S “Strategically Wrong: Bias And Argumentation”, Cristian Santibanez Yanez

OSSA Conference Archive

Macpherson highlights that: “Santibanez does not take the further step of saying this explicitly. At the same time, the language used by the author throughout the paper suggests that he may assent to the claim that such lies are morally wrong: For example, even when discussing more benign forms of deception such as deceiving oneself into believing that they are a very good professor or a soccer player’s deceiving their opponents about their intent, there is reference to ‘damage’ and to the ‘victim’ of the deception.


Reply To Commentary On ‘Emotional Legal Arguments And A Broken Leg’, Rubens Damasceno-Morais May 2016

Reply To Commentary On ‘Emotional Legal Arguments And A Broken Leg’, Rubens Damasceno-Morais

OSSA Conference Archive

No abstract provided.


Demonstrating Objectivity In Controversial Science Communication: A Case Study Of Gmo Scientist Kevin Folta, Jean Goodwin May 2016

Demonstrating Objectivity In Controversial Science Communication: A Case Study Of Gmo Scientist Kevin Folta, Jean Goodwin

OSSA Conference Archive

Scientists can find it difficult to be seen as objective within the chaos of a civic controversy. This paper gives a normative pragmatic account of the strategy one GMO scientist used to demonstrate his trustworthiness. Kevin Folta made his talk expensive by undertaking to answer all questions, and carried out this responsibility by acting as if every comment addressed to him—even the most hostile—was in fact a question in good faith. This presumption of audience good faith gave in turn his audience good reason to presume his good faith, and a situation of reciprocal distrust was transformed into ...


Virtuous Vices: On Objectivity, Bias, And Virtue In Argumentation, Daniel H. Cohen, Katharina Stevens May 2016

Virtuous Vices: On Objectivity, Bias, And Virtue In Argumentation, Daniel H. Cohen, Katharina Stevens

OSSA Conference Archive

How is it possible that biases are cognitive vices, objectivity is an exemplary intellectual virtue, and yet objectivity is itself a bias? In this paper, we argue that objectivity is indeed a kind of bias but is still an argumentative virtue. In common with many biases – and many virtues – its effects are neither uniformly negative nor uniformly positive. Consequences alone are not enough to determine which character traits are argumentative virtues. Context matters.

The opening section addresses the problem of identifying argumentative virtues and provides a preliminary response to recent questions from Goddu and Godden regarding the foundations of virtue-based ...


The Willingness To Be Rationally Persuaded, Michael D. Baumtrog May 2016

The Willingness To Be Rationally Persuaded, Michael D. Baumtrog

OSSA Conference Archive

In this paper I argue that underlying phronêsis is the more foundational virtue of a willingness to be rationally persuaded (WTRBP). A WTBRP is a virtue in the sense that it fulfills the doctrine of the mean by falling between two vices – never sticking to your position and never giving it up. Articulating a WTBRP in this way also helps address problems phronêsis faces in light of implicit bias research.


Comparing Two Models Of Evidence, Tone Kvernbekk May 2016

Comparing Two Models Of Evidence, Tone Kvernbekk

OSSA Conference Archive

The context for this paper is evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP is about production of desirable change. The evidence should come from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). To make sense of RCT evidence it must be placed in an argument structure. I compare two different models, Toulmin and Cartwright, and investigate whether the two models can be merged into one. I shall argue that such merging is not feasible.


Meta-Argumentation In Deliberative Discourse: Rhetoric 1360b05-1365b21, Paula Olmos May 2016

Meta-Argumentation In Deliberative Discourse: Rhetoric 1360b05-1365b21, Paula Olmos

OSSA Conference Archive

In Rhetoric 1360b05-1365b21, Aristotle naturally assumes the debatable, exceptionable and multidimensional character of the kind of allegations, adduced as reasons for the proposals (Kock 2006, 2012; Vega 2013) which act as conclusions of the practical arguments typical of political debate. This is a problem which has been currently addressed in terms of the prima facie incommensurability caused by the multi-dimensionality of value-based argumentation, an approach that seems to lead us to an evaluative and dialectical dead-end. But in the Aristotelian text, we find a different tactic. Aristotle analyses in very explicit and revealing terms how the “continuum between argument and ...


Responding To Charges Of Climate Hype, Adam Auch May 2016

Responding To Charges Of Climate Hype, Adam Auch

OSSA Conference Archive

I consider hype as it relates to discourse surrounding climate change. The presence of hype about a subject can make it difficult to judge what and whom one should believe. This may lead to concerns about climate change to be unfairly dismissed. For this reason, I argue that advocating for climate change mitigation efforts requires not only reiterating the soundness of the underlying science, but also understanding the social and psychological phenomena that produce the confusion.


Emotional Arguments: What Would Neuroscientists And Psychologists Say?, Linda Carozza May 2016

Emotional Arguments: What Would Neuroscientists And Psychologists Say?, Linda Carozza

OSSA Conference Archive

Why is there resistance in acknowledging emotional arguments? I explore the ambiguity entrenched in the emotional mode of argument, which may contribute to the lack of widespread agreement about its existence. In particular, belief systems and personality styles are addressed, as they are integral to the emotional mode of argumentation. This multidisciplinary approach neither advocates or dismisses the emotional mode; it adds another layer of understanding to the literature that is important to consider.


On Appeals To (Visual) Models, Ian Dove May 2016

On Appeals To (Visual) Models, Ian Dove

OSSA Conference Archive

In some visual cases, especially those in which one reasons from a visual model to a conclusion, it is tempting to think that some new normative base, perhaps a visual logic is in order. I show that, at least in the case of what I’ll call appeal to visual models, the same criteria are required in visual and verbal cases.