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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

To Be Everything: Sylvia Plath And The Problem That Has No Name, Alanna P. Mcauliffe May 2018

To Be Everything: Sylvia Plath And The Problem That Has No Name, Alanna P. Mcauliffe

Student Theses

This thesis explores, in depth, how the poetry of Sylvia Plath operates as an expression of female discontent in the decade directly preceding the sexual revolution. This analysis incorporates both sociohistorical context and theory introduced in Betty Friedan’s 1963 work The Feminine Mystique. In particular, Plath’s work is put in conversation with Friedan’s notion of the “problem that has no name,” an all-consuming sense of malaise and dissatisfaction that plagued American women in the postwar era. This notion is furthered by close-readings of poems written throughout various stages of Plath’s career (namely “Spinster,” “Two Sisters of ...


Naturalism And The New Woman: Fated Motherhood In Kate Chopin's The Awakening And Edith Wharton's The House Of Mirth, Lindsay J. Patorno May 2018

Naturalism And The New Woman: Fated Motherhood In Kate Chopin's The Awakening And Edith Wharton's The House Of Mirth, Lindsay J. Patorno

Honors Theses

Proto-feminist novels have garnered great critical attention in recent decades, largely owing to the reclamation efforts of feminist scholars from the 1960s onwards. These feminist scholars have remarked the fin-de-siècle emergence of a recurring narrative archetype: the unabashed New Woman, whose exploits in what were traditionally male-dominated spheres distinguished her from the domesticated matrons and sentimental bachelorettes of past literary paradigms. While the New Woman is now a commonplace among feminist critics, the following thesis uniquely interprets this feministic archetype in conjunction with the concurrent movement of American literary naturalism—a genre that proffers a deterministic worldview and is often ...


Anthropocene Feminism By Richard Grusin, Stephanie Eccles Feb 2018

Anthropocene Feminism By Richard Grusin, Stephanie Eccles

The Goose

Review of Richard Grusin's Anthropocene Feminism.


The Poetry Of Louise Glück: The Search For A Feminine Self Through The Lens Of Kristevan Psychoanalytic Feminist Literary Theory, Allison Cooke Feb 2018

The Poetry Of Louise Glück: The Search For A Feminine Self Through The Lens Of Kristevan Psychoanalytic Feminist Literary Theory, Allison Cooke

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

This essay looks at the poetry of Louise Glück, specifically her two poems “Fugue” and “Persephone the Wanderer” from her 2006 collection Averno, for how the figures of the young woman/daughter and the mother struggle with and for their self-identity in relation to each other and to themselves. Drawing from the philosophy and literary theory of Jacques Derrida, Julia Kristeva, and Margaret Homans to develop the framing concepts of chora, potential capability, paralanguage, and the abject, this essay's argument suggests that these two feminine figures demonstrate difficult and traumatic transformations into what it means to be a woman ...


Esther Reed's Political Sentiments And Rhetoric During The Revolutionary War, Kennedy Harkins Jan 2018

Esther Reed's Political Sentiments And Rhetoric During The Revolutionary War, Kennedy Harkins

Honors Undergraduate Theses

In 1780, during the final leg of the American Revolutionary War, Esther Reed penned the broadside “Sentiments of an American Woman.” It circulated in Philadelphia, persuading citizens to turn over their last dollars to the cause. Reed’s broadside called to action the women of Philadelphia; they knocked on doors, campaigned with words, and stepped firmly into the “man’s world” of politics and revolution. Reed’s words were so effective that women in cities across the colonies took to raising money as well. Using New Historicist and feminist reading strategies, this study compares and contrasts Reed’s rhetoric to ...